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Platforms, Merchants, and Market Space / Christopher, Muellerleile

Market/place

Swansea University Author: Christopher, Muellerleile

Abstract

This chapter argues that the emergence of telegraphic technologies and their effects on markets in 19th century offers a unique analytical lens through which to rethink the spatiality of contemporary digital platforms. The chapter considers the effects of separating the communication of information...

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Published in: Market/place
Published: Newcastle Agenda
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51240
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first_indexed 2019-07-28T22:29:55Z
last_indexed 2020-07-06T13:12:59Z
id cronfa51240
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spelling 2020-07-06T11:51:47.5445372 v2 51240 2019-07-28 Platforms, Merchants, and Market Space 62c8e47d6145081a464eadba0ff5c942 0000-0001-9685-6345 Christopher Muellerleile Christopher Muellerleile true false 2019-07-28 SGE This chapter argues that the emergence of telegraphic technologies and their effects on markets in 19th century offers a unique analytical lens through which to rethink the spatiality of contemporary digital platforms. The chapter considers the effects of separating the communication of information from the transportation of physical goods, and what effects this separation has on the character of markets and market makers. Specifically, the chapter compares telegraph enabled commodity and financial exchanges in the 19th century with digital platforms such as Amazon, Airbnb, and Facebook. A number of common effects are apparent. First, in both instances, the merchant class appears to acquire disproportionate power in rearranging the spatialities of the socio-economy according to the logics of exchange value. Second, one of the main ways they acquire this power is through the shrewd management of vast increases in circulating information. In part this is accomplished by constructing new abstract categories and in some cases, full-fledged information infrastructures. Third, financial and commodity merchants and contemporary platform capitalists both succeed by evading previous systems of social and juridical regulation, one effect of which is a tendency toward monopolization. Book chapter Market/place Agenda Newcastle 0 0 0 0001-01-01 COLLEGE NANME Geography COLLEGE CODE SGE Swansea University 2020-07-06T11:51:47.5445372 2019-07-28T16:18:11.0401255 Christopher Muellerleile 0000-0001-9685-6345 1
title Platforms, Merchants, and Market Space
spellingShingle Platforms, Merchants, and Market Space
Christopher, Muellerleile
title_short Platforms, Merchants, and Market Space
title_full Platforms, Merchants, and Market Space
title_fullStr Platforms, Merchants, and Market Space
title_full_unstemmed Platforms, Merchants, and Market Space
title_sort Platforms, Merchants, and Market Space
author_id_str_mv 62c8e47d6145081a464eadba0ff5c942
author_id_fullname_str_mv 62c8e47d6145081a464eadba0ff5c942_***_Christopher, Muellerleile
author Christopher, Muellerleile
format Book chapter
container_title Market/place
institution Swansea University
publisher Agenda
document_store_str 0
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description This chapter argues that the emergence of telegraphic technologies and their effects on markets in 19th century offers a unique analytical lens through which to rethink the spatiality of contemporary digital platforms. The chapter considers the effects of separating the communication of information from the transportation of physical goods, and what effects this separation has on the character of markets and market makers. Specifically, the chapter compares telegraph enabled commodity and financial exchanges in the 19th century with digital platforms such as Amazon, Airbnb, and Facebook. A number of common effects are apparent. First, in both instances, the merchant class appears to acquire disproportionate power in rearranging the spatialities of the socio-economy according to the logics of exchange value. Second, one of the main ways they acquire this power is through the shrewd management of vast increases in circulating information. In part this is accomplished by constructing new abstract categories and in some cases, full-fledged information infrastructures. Third, financial and commodity merchants and contemporary platform capitalists both succeed by evading previous systems of social and juridical regulation, one effect of which is a tendency toward monopolization.
published_date 0001-01-01T04:18:22Z
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score 10.741762