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Does childbirth experience affect infant behaviour? Exploring the perceptions of maternity care providers

C. Power, Claire Williams Orcid Logo, Amy Brown Orcid Logo

Midwifery, Volume: 78, Pages: 131 - 139

Swansea University Authors: Claire Williams Orcid Logo, Amy Brown Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Objective - High levels of childbirth interventions are known to increase risk of health complications for mother and infant, alongsidehaving a negative impact upon maternal wellbeing. However less is understood about how childbirth experience may affect infant behaviour(e.g. how calm or unsettled a...

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Published in: Midwifery
ISSN: 0266-6138
Published: Elsevier BV 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51293
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2019-10-18T09:32:45.8165047</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>51293</id><entry>2019-08-01</entry><title>Does childbirth experience affect infant behaviour? Exploring the perceptions of maternity care providers</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-0791-744X</ORCID><firstname>Claire</firstname><surname>Williams</surname><name>Claire Williams</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-0438-0157</ORCID><firstname>Amy</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><name>Amy Brown</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2019-08-01</date><deptcode>HPS</deptcode><abstract>Objective - High levels of childbirth interventions are known to increase risk of health complications for mother and infant, alongsidehaving a negative impact upon maternal wellbeing. However less is understood about how childbirth experience may affect infant behaviour(e.g. how calm or unsettled an infant is). This study explores maternity care provider perceptions of how and why childbirth experience may affect infant behaviour.Design - A qualitative semi-structured interview study.Setting - Bristol, Swansea and West Wales, UK.Participants - 18 maternity care providers.Measurements and findings - A semi-structured interview schedule was developed to explore maternity care providers' perceptions of howmaternal experience of childbirth could influence infant behaviour. Findings highlighted how maternity care providers perceived childbirthexperience to sometimes impact positively or negatively on infant behaviour. A calmer birth and postnatal experience was believed to leadto a calmer infant, whilst physical and emotional stress was associated with more challenging infant behaviours such as crying and beingunsettled. Pathways were perceived to be direct (pain and stress during birth might physiologically affect the infant) and indirect (birth wasperceived to affect maternal wellbeing and subsequently her interactions with her baby). However, postnatal factors such as skin to skin,postnatal environment and emotional support were believed to mediate these impacts.Key conclusions - Birth experience was considered to affect infantbehaviour. Promoting as positive a birth experience as possible,including postnatal care, was viewed as significant in supportingpositive infant behaviours. Maternity care providers believed this couldhelp facilitate bonding, attachment, and mother-infant wellbeing in thepostnatal period.Implications for practice - The findings highlight maternity care providers' views concerning supporting normal birth and protectingemotional wellbeing during birth and postnatally. Where interventions are necessary, ensuring a calm environment, and enabling normal postnatal behaviours such as skin to skin and breastfeeding were perceived as important. Midwives, it was claimed, need time to nurture mothers alongside providing physical care.Limitations - Participants were self-selecting and might therefore have been biased.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Midwifery</journal><volume>78</volume><paginationStart>131</paginationStart><paginationEnd>139</paginationEnd><publisher>Elsevier BV</publisher><issnPrint>0266-6138</issnPrint><keywords>Childbirth Perceptions, Childbirth Interventions, Infant Temperament, Baby Behaviour, Skin to Skin, Breastfeeding</keywords><publishedDay>30</publishedDay><publishedMonth>11</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2019</publishedYear><publishedDate>2019-11-30</publishedDate><doi>10.1016/j.midw.2019.07.021</doi><url>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2019.07.021</url><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Psychology</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>HPS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2019-10-18T09:32:45.8165047</lastEdited><Created>2019-08-01T13:39:25.3386313</Created><authors><author><firstname>C.</firstname><surname>Power</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Claire</firstname><surname>Williams</surname><orcid>0000-0002-0791-744X</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Amy</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><orcid>0000-0002-0438-0157</orcid><order>3</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>0051293-16082019144558.pdf</filename><originalFilename>51293.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2019-08-16T14:45:58.2630000</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>627977</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><embargoDate>2020-07-31T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><documentNotes>Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC-BY-NC-ND).</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2019-10-18T09:32:45.8165047 v2 51293 2019-08-01 Does childbirth experience affect infant behaviour? Exploring the perceptions of maternity care providers 21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d 0000-0002-0791-744X Claire Williams Claire Williams true false 37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3 0000-0002-0438-0157 Amy Brown Amy Brown true false 2019-08-01 HPS Objective - High levels of childbirth interventions are known to increase risk of health complications for mother and infant, alongsidehaving a negative impact upon maternal wellbeing. However less is understood about how childbirth experience may affect infant behaviour(e.g. how calm or unsettled an infant is). This study explores maternity care provider perceptions of how and why childbirth experience may affect infant behaviour.Design - A qualitative semi-structured interview study.Setting - Bristol, Swansea and West Wales, UK.Participants - 18 maternity care providers.Measurements and findings - A semi-structured interview schedule was developed to explore maternity care providers' perceptions of howmaternal experience of childbirth could influence infant behaviour. Findings highlighted how maternity care providers perceived childbirthexperience to sometimes impact positively or negatively on infant behaviour. A calmer birth and postnatal experience was believed to leadto a calmer infant, whilst physical and emotional stress was associated with more challenging infant behaviours such as crying and beingunsettled. Pathways were perceived to be direct (pain and stress during birth might physiologically affect the infant) and indirect (birth wasperceived to affect maternal wellbeing and subsequently her interactions with her baby). However, postnatal factors such as skin to skin,postnatal environment and emotional support were believed to mediate these impacts.Key conclusions - Birth experience was considered to affect infantbehaviour. Promoting as positive a birth experience as possible,including postnatal care, was viewed as significant in supportingpositive infant behaviours. Maternity care providers believed this couldhelp facilitate bonding, attachment, and mother-infant wellbeing in thepostnatal period.Implications for practice - The findings highlight maternity care providers' views concerning supporting normal birth and protectingemotional wellbeing during birth and postnatally. Where interventions are necessary, ensuring a calm environment, and enabling normal postnatal behaviours such as skin to skin and breastfeeding were perceived as important. Midwives, it was claimed, need time to nurture mothers alongside providing physical care.Limitations - Participants were self-selecting and might therefore have been biased. Journal Article Midwifery 78 131 139 Elsevier BV 0266-6138 Childbirth Perceptions, Childbirth Interventions, Infant Temperament, Baby Behaviour, Skin to Skin, Breastfeeding 30 11 2019 2019-11-30 10.1016/j.midw.2019.07.021 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2019.07.021 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2019-10-18T09:32:45.8165047 2019-08-01T13:39:25.3386313 C. Power 1 Claire Williams 0000-0002-0791-744X 2 Amy Brown 0000-0002-0438-0157 3 0051293-16082019144558.pdf 51293.pdf 2019-08-16T14:45:58.2630000 Output 627977 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2020-07-31T00:00:00.0000000 Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC-BY-NC-ND). true eng
title Does childbirth experience affect infant behaviour? Exploring the perceptions of maternity care providers
spellingShingle Does childbirth experience affect infant behaviour? Exploring the perceptions of maternity care providers
Claire Williams
Amy Brown
title_short Does childbirth experience affect infant behaviour? Exploring the perceptions of maternity care providers
title_full Does childbirth experience affect infant behaviour? Exploring the perceptions of maternity care providers
title_fullStr Does childbirth experience affect infant behaviour? Exploring the perceptions of maternity care providers
title_full_unstemmed Does childbirth experience affect infant behaviour? Exploring the perceptions of maternity care providers
title_sort Does childbirth experience affect infant behaviour? Exploring the perceptions of maternity care providers
author_id_str_mv 21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d
37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3
author_id_fullname_str_mv 21dc2ebf100cf324becc27e8db6fde8d_***_Claire Williams
37aea6965461cb0510473d109411a0c3_***_Amy Brown
author Claire Williams
Amy Brown
author2 C. Power
Claire Williams
Amy Brown
format Journal article
container_title Midwifery
container_volume 78
container_start_page 131
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
issn 0266-6138
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.midw.2019.07.021
publisher Elsevier BV
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.midw.2019.07.021
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Objective - High levels of childbirth interventions are known to increase risk of health complications for mother and infant, alongsidehaving a negative impact upon maternal wellbeing. However less is understood about how childbirth experience may affect infant behaviour(e.g. how calm or unsettled an infant is). This study explores maternity care provider perceptions of how and why childbirth experience may affect infant behaviour.Design - A qualitative semi-structured interview study.Setting - Bristol, Swansea and West Wales, UK.Participants - 18 maternity care providers.Measurements and findings - A semi-structured interview schedule was developed to explore maternity care providers' perceptions of howmaternal experience of childbirth could influence infant behaviour. Findings highlighted how maternity care providers perceived childbirthexperience to sometimes impact positively or negatively on infant behaviour. A calmer birth and postnatal experience was believed to leadto a calmer infant, whilst physical and emotional stress was associated with more challenging infant behaviours such as crying and beingunsettled. Pathways were perceived to be direct (pain and stress during birth might physiologically affect the infant) and indirect (birth wasperceived to affect maternal wellbeing and subsequently her interactions with her baby). However, postnatal factors such as skin to skin,postnatal environment and emotional support were believed to mediate these impacts.Key conclusions - Birth experience was considered to affect infantbehaviour. Promoting as positive a birth experience as possible,including postnatal care, was viewed as significant in supportingpositive infant behaviours. Maternity care providers believed this couldhelp facilitate bonding, attachment, and mother-infant wellbeing in thepostnatal period.Implications for practice - The findings highlight maternity care providers' views concerning supporting normal birth and protectingemotional wellbeing during birth and postnatally. Where interventions are necessary, ensuring a calm environment, and enabling normal postnatal behaviours such as skin to skin and breastfeeding were perceived as important. Midwives, it was claimed, need time to nurture mothers alongside providing physical care.Limitations - Participants were self-selecting and might therefore have been biased.
published_date 2019-11-30T03:59:33Z
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