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The effects of acute branched-chain amino acid supplementation on recovery from a single bout of hypertrophy exercise in resistance-trained athletes

Mark Waldron Orcid Logo, Kieran Whelan, Owen Jeffries, Dean Burt, Louis Howe, Stephen David Patterson

Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Volume: 42, Issue: 6, Pages: 630 - 636

Swansea University Author: Mark Waldron Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1139/apnm-2016-0569

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of acute branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage among experienced resistance-trained athletes. In a double-blind matched-pairs design, 16 resistance-trained participants, routinely performing hypertrophy tr...

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Published in: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
ISSN: 1715-5312 1715-5320
Published: NRC research press 2017
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51426
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spelling 2019-09-04T11:15:26.8949374 v2 51426 2019-08-15 The effects of acute branched-chain amino acid supplementation on recovery from a single bout of hypertrophy exercise in resistance-trained athletes 70db7c6c54d46f5e70b39e5ae0a056fa 0000-0002-2720-4615 Mark Waldron Mark Waldron true false 2019-08-15 STSC This study investigated the effects of acute branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage among experienced resistance-trained athletes. In a double-blind matched-pairs design, 16 resistance-trained participants, routinely performing hypertrophy training, were randomly assigned to a BCAA (n = 8) or placebo (n = 8) group. The BCAAs were administered at a dosage of 0.087 g/kg body mass, with a 2:1:1 ratio of leucine, isoleucine, and valine. The participants performed 6 sets of 10 full-squats at 70% 1-repetition maximum to induce muscle damage. All participants were diet-controlled across the study. Creatine kinase, peak isometric knee-extensor force, perceived muscle soreness, and countermovement jump (CMJ) height were measured immediately before (baseline) and at 1 h, 24 h, and 48 h postexercise. There were large to very large time effects for all measurements between baseline and 24–48 h. Between-group comparisons, expressed as a percentage of baseline, revealed differences in isometric strength at 24-h (placebo ∼87% vs. BCAA ∼92%; moderate, likely), CMJ at 24 h (placebo ∼93% vs. BCAA ∼96%; small, likely), and muscle soreness at both 24 h (placebo ∼685% vs. BCAA ∼531%; small, likely) and 48 h (placebo ∼468% vs. BCAA ∼350%; small, likely). Acute supplementation of BCAAs (0.087 g/kg) increased the rate of recovery in isometric strength, CMJ height, and perceived muscle soreness compared with placebo after a hypertrophy-based training session among diet-controlled, resistance-trained athletes. These findings question the need for longer BCAA loading phases and highlight the importance of dietary control in studies of this type. Journal Article Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 42 6 630 636 NRC research press 1715-5312 1715-5320 27 1 2017 2017-01-27 10.1139/apnm-2016-0569 https://doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2016-0569 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2019-09-04T11:15:26.8949374 2019-08-15T16:19:40.3104329 College of Engineering Engineering Mark Waldron 0000-0002-2720-4615 1 Kieran Whelan 2 Owen Jeffries 3 Dean Burt 4 Louis Howe 5 Stephen David Patterson 6 51426__15766__78e710ef4a5a4157a174a5618d9f7eb0.pdf 51426.pdf 2019-10-31T13:06:59.8141730 Output 154183 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true false
title The effects of acute branched-chain amino acid supplementation on recovery from a single bout of hypertrophy exercise in resistance-trained athletes
spellingShingle The effects of acute branched-chain amino acid supplementation on recovery from a single bout of hypertrophy exercise in resistance-trained athletes
Mark Waldron
title_short The effects of acute branched-chain amino acid supplementation on recovery from a single bout of hypertrophy exercise in resistance-trained athletes
title_full The effects of acute branched-chain amino acid supplementation on recovery from a single bout of hypertrophy exercise in resistance-trained athletes
title_fullStr The effects of acute branched-chain amino acid supplementation on recovery from a single bout of hypertrophy exercise in resistance-trained athletes
title_full_unstemmed The effects of acute branched-chain amino acid supplementation on recovery from a single bout of hypertrophy exercise in resistance-trained athletes
title_sort The effects of acute branched-chain amino acid supplementation on recovery from a single bout of hypertrophy exercise in resistance-trained athletes
author_id_str_mv 70db7c6c54d46f5e70b39e5ae0a056fa
author_id_fullname_str_mv 70db7c6c54d46f5e70b39e5ae0a056fa_***_Mark Waldron
author Mark Waldron
author2 Mark Waldron
Kieran Whelan
Owen Jeffries
Dean Burt
Louis Howe
Stephen David Patterson
format Journal article
container_title Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
container_volume 42
container_issue 6
container_start_page 630
publishDate 2017
institution Swansea University
issn 1715-5312
1715-5320
doi_str_mv 10.1139/apnm-2016-0569
publisher NRC research press
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
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url https://doi.org/10.1139/apnm-2016-0569
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description This study investigated the effects of acute branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) supplementation on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage among experienced resistance-trained athletes. In a double-blind matched-pairs design, 16 resistance-trained participants, routinely performing hypertrophy training, were randomly assigned to a BCAA (n = 8) or placebo (n = 8) group. The BCAAs were administered at a dosage of 0.087 g/kg body mass, with a 2:1:1 ratio of leucine, isoleucine, and valine. The participants performed 6 sets of 10 full-squats at 70% 1-repetition maximum to induce muscle damage. All participants were diet-controlled across the study. Creatine kinase, peak isometric knee-extensor force, perceived muscle soreness, and countermovement jump (CMJ) height were measured immediately before (baseline) and at 1 h, 24 h, and 48 h postexercise. There were large to very large time effects for all measurements between baseline and 24–48 h. Between-group comparisons, expressed as a percentage of baseline, revealed differences in isometric strength at 24-h (placebo ∼87% vs. BCAA ∼92%; moderate, likely), CMJ at 24 h (placebo ∼93% vs. BCAA ∼96%; small, likely), and muscle soreness at both 24 h (placebo ∼685% vs. BCAA ∼531%; small, likely) and 48 h (placebo ∼468% vs. BCAA ∼350%; small, likely). Acute supplementation of BCAAs (0.087 g/kg) increased the rate of recovery in isometric strength, CMJ height, and perceived muscle soreness compared with placebo after a hypertrophy-based training session among diet-controlled, resistance-trained athletes. These findings question the need for longer BCAA loading phases and highlight the importance of dietary control in studies of this type.
published_date 2017-01-27T04:05:02Z
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