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Co-construction of a national curriculum: the role of teachers as curriculum policy makers in Wales / Tom Crick; Mark Priestley

European Conference on Educational Research (ECER 2019)

Swansea University Author: Tom, Crick

Abstract

Emergent worldwide curriculum policy since the turn of the millennium has placed a strong emphasis on the central role of teachers as curriculum makers (Priestley & Biesta, 2013). Supra-level curriculum discourses (Thijs & van den Akker, 2009), propagated by organisations such as the OECD ha...

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Published in: European Conference on Educational Research (ECER 2019)
Published: Hamburg, Germany 2019
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa51737
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first_indexed 2019-09-09T15:26:33Z
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spelling 2020-07-02T15:05:40.0573366 v2 51737 2019-09-09 Co-construction of a national curriculum: the role of teachers as curriculum policy makers in Wales 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 0000-0001-5196-9389 Tom Crick Tom Crick true false 2019-09-09 EDUC Emergent worldwide curriculum policy since the turn of the millennium has placed a strong emphasis on the central role of teachers as curriculum makers (Priestley & Biesta, 2013). Supra-level curriculum discourses (Thijs & van den Akker, 2009), propagated by organisations such as the OECD have extolled the benefits of school autonomy and the agency of teachers as local curriculum makers with expertise in their own localities. National/state macro-level curriculum policies have explicitly positioned teachers as agents of change and active curriculum makers with local flexibility to decide curricular content and pedagogic approaches (e.g. the New Zealand Curriculum, the Singapore Curriculum, Hong Kong’s Curriculum Framework, Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence, Ireland’s Junior Cycle Curriculum). Teacher involvement in curriculum making has tended to be restricted to curriculum making activity at the meso-level (for example, activity by district and regional agencies to support curriculum making in schools) and micro-level (school-based curriculum development) of education systems. Systematic and large-scale involvement by teachers as [relatively] autonomous leaders of macro-level curriculum making (i.e. the formation of national policy) has been less common. While the engagement of teachers in the development of the new curricula has been commonplace, this has tended to comprise consultation (e.g. in Ireland’s Junior Cycle reforms) or minimal autonomy in curriculum writing (e.g. the secondment of teachers under the direction of national education officials to work on writing the learning outcomes in Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence).This symposium focuses on three jurisdictions -- British Columbia (Canada), Wales and the Netherlands -- where teachers have been taken a more active role -- in principle at least -- as autonomous curriculum makers. The three cases explore the nature and extent of teachers’ roles in the development of national/state curriculum policy. They illustrate how teachers’ inputs shape the emergent policy, and examine how such engagement develops their agency as curriculum makers. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract European Conference on Educational Research (ECER 2019) Hamburg, Germany 5 9 2019 2019-09-05 Part of a symposium entitled: "Teachers as policymakers: the co-construction of national curriculum policy" COLLEGE NANME School of Education COLLEGE CODE EDUC Swansea University 2020-07-02T15:05:40.0573366 2019-09-09T11:53:23.4404554 College of Arts and Humanities School of Education Tom Crick 0000-0001-5196-9389 1 Mark Priestley 2
title Co-construction of a national curriculum: the role of teachers as curriculum policy makers in Wales
spellingShingle Co-construction of a national curriculum: the role of teachers as curriculum policy makers in Wales
Tom, Crick
title_short Co-construction of a national curriculum: the role of teachers as curriculum policy makers in Wales
title_full Co-construction of a national curriculum: the role of teachers as curriculum policy makers in Wales
title_fullStr Co-construction of a national curriculum: the role of teachers as curriculum policy makers in Wales
title_full_unstemmed Co-construction of a national curriculum: the role of teachers as curriculum policy makers in Wales
title_sort Co-construction of a national curriculum: the role of teachers as curriculum policy makers in Wales
author_id_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
author_id_fullname_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Tom, Crick
author Tom, Crick
author2 Tom Crick
Mark Priestley
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publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str School of Education{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}School of Education
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description Emergent worldwide curriculum policy since the turn of the millennium has placed a strong emphasis on the central role of teachers as curriculum makers (Priestley & Biesta, 2013). Supra-level curriculum discourses (Thijs & van den Akker, 2009), propagated by organisations such as the OECD have extolled the benefits of school autonomy and the agency of teachers as local curriculum makers with expertise in their own localities. National/state macro-level curriculum policies have explicitly positioned teachers as agents of change and active curriculum makers with local flexibility to decide curricular content and pedagogic approaches (e.g. the New Zealand Curriculum, the Singapore Curriculum, Hong Kong’s Curriculum Framework, Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence, Ireland’s Junior Cycle Curriculum). Teacher involvement in curriculum making has tended to be restricted to curriculum making activity at the meso-level (for example, activity by district and regional agencies to support curriculum making in schools) and micro-level (school-based curriculum development) of education systems. Systematic and large-scale involvement by teachers as [relatively] autonomous leaders of macro-level curriculum making (i.e. the formation of national policy) has been less common. While the engagement of teachers in the development of the new curricula has been commonplace, this has tended to comprise consultation (e.g. in Ireland’s Junior Cycle reforms) or minimal autonomy in curriculum writing (e.g. the secondment of teachers under the direction of national education officials to work on writing the learning outcomes in Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence).This symposium focuses on three jurisdictions -- British Columbia (Canada), Wales and the Netherlands -- where teachers have been taken a more active role -- in principle at least -- as autonomous curriculum makers. The three cases explore the nature and extent of teachers’ roles in the development of national/state curriculum policy. They illustrate how teachers’ inputs shape the emergent policy, and examine how such engagement develops their agency as curriculum makers.
published_date 2019-09-05T04:04:12Z
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