No Cover Image

Book 854 views

The Politics of Dependence - Economic Parasites and Vulnerable Lives

Patrick Cockburn Orcid Logo

Swansea University Author: Patrick Cockburn Orcid Logo

Full text not available from this repository: check for access using links below.

DOI (Published version): 10.1007/978-3-319-78908-8

Abstract

The Politics of Dependence argues that economic dependence is a basic feature of all societies and exists in many forms: from dependence on income from the state (for example in welfare support) to dependence on income from the family (for example through inheritance). By seeing economic dependence...

Full description

ISBN: 9783319787091 9783319789088
Published: New York Palgrave Macmillan 2018
Online Access: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-78908-8
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa52087
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: The Politics of Dependence argues that economic dependence is a basic feature of all societies and exists in many forms: from dependence on income from the state (for example in welfare support) to dependence on income from the family (for example through inheritance). By seeing economic dependence as a common feature of social and economic relationships the book dismantles the common myth that economic dependence is a condition that is specific to the recipients of state support, and argues instead that some of the most economically powerful members of society are in fact deeply dependent upon - sometimes economically parasitical upon - weaker economic actors. The book develops the distinction between 'practical dependence' and 'structural dependence', examines core economic institutions such as property and money through the normative lens of issues about dependence, and offers a new starting point for thinking about economic justice by claiming that as a society we have decisions to make about the forms of dependence that we accept and build into our social and economic arrangements, and those that we reject.
Keywords: dependence, economic justice, parasites, welfare state, capitalism, power
College: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences