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Towards a Political Economy of Charging Regimes: Fines, Fees and Force in Uk Immigration Control

Jon Burnett Orcid Logo, Fidelis Chebe

The British Journal of Criminology, Volume: 60, Issue: 3, Pages: 579 - 599

Swansea University Author: Jon Burnett Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1093/bjc/azz070

Abstract

This article examines the political economy of charging regimes within immigration control in the UK, focusing its attention on UKVI fees and charges, carrier sanctions, charges related to accessing services and civil penalties administered though immigration enforcement. While distinct charging reg...

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Published in: The British Journal of Criminology
ISSN: 0007-0955 1464-3529
Published: Oxford Oxford University Press (OUP) 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa52322
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first_indexed 2019-10-03T20:45:15Z
last_indexed 2020-10-14T03:06:14Z
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spelling 2020-10-13T17:12:10.8425230 v2 52322 2019-10-03 Towards a Political Economy of Charging Regimes: Fines, Fees and Force in Uk Immigration Control 3c4e0496f3701567ac4a28536ff237f9 0000-0002-9229-897X Jon Burnett Jon Burnett true false 2019-10-03 CSSP This article examines the political economy of charging regimes within immigration control in the UK, focusing its attention on UKVI fees and charges, carrier sanctions, charges related to accessing services and civil penalties administered though immigration enforcement. While distinct charging regimes have been analysed in their individual guises, to date there has been little substantive analysis bringing these regimes together and locating them at the centre of its enquiry. Drawing on data obtained through the Freedom of Information Act 2000, this paper consequently examines the functions and prevalence of charging regimes, arguing that they contribute to an economy of financial power which has significant implications for understandings of criminalisation and immigration enforcement. Journal Article The British Journal of Criminology 60 3 579 599 Oxford University Press (OUP) Oxford 0007-0955 1464-3529 charging regimes, civil penalties, immigration fees, immigration enforcement, carrier sanctions 1 3 2020 2020-03-01 10.1093/bjc/azz070 COLLEGE NANME Criminology, Sociology and Social Policy COLLEGE CODE CSSP Swansea University 2020-10-13T17:12:10.8425230 2019-10-03T14:59:38.1488698 Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law Criminology Jon Burnett 0000-0002-9229-897X 1 Fidelis Chebe 2 52322__15667__821059bef140437f81a84b3d79ab97fd.pdf 52322.pdf 2019-10-17T17:42:48.1500000 Output 311426 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2021-11-26T00:00:00.0000000 true eng
title Towards a Political Economy of Charging Regimes: Fines, Fees and Force in Uk Immigration Control
spellingShingle Towards a Political Economy of Charging Regimes: Fines, Fees and Force in Uk Immigration Control
Jon Burnett
title_short Towards a Political Economy of Charging Regimes: Fines, Fees and Force in Uk Immigration Control
title_full Towards a Political Economy of Charging Regimes: Fines, Fees and Force in Uk Immigration Control
title_fullStr Towards a Political Economy of Charging Regimes: Fines, Fees and Force in Uk Immigration Control
title_full_unstemmed Towards a Political Economy of Charging Regimes: Fines, Fees and Force in Uk Immigration Control
title_sort Towards a Political Economy of Charging Regimes: Fines, Fees and Force in Uk Immigration Control
author_id_str_mv 3c4e0496f3701567ac4a28536ff237f9
author_id_fullname_str_mv 3c4e0496f3701567ac4a28536ff237f9_***_Jon Burnett
author Jon Burnett
author2 Jon Burnett
Fidelis Chebe
format Journal article
container_title The British Journal of Criminology
container_volume 60
container_issue 3
container_start_page 579
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 0007-0955
1464-3529
doi_str_mv 10.1093/bjc/azz070
publisher Oxford University Press (OUP)
college_str Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
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hierarchy_top_id hillaryrodhamclintonschooloflaw
hierarchy_top_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
hierarchy_parent_id hillaryrodhamclintonschooloflaw
hierarchy_parent_title Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law
department_str Criminology{{{_:::_}}}Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law{{{_:::_}}}Criminology
document_store_str 1
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description This article examines the political economy of charging regimes within immigration control in the UK, focusing its attention on UKVI fees and charges, carrier sanctions, charges related to accessing services and civil penalties administered though immigration enforcement. While distinct charging regimes have been analysed in their individual guises, to date there has been little substantive analysis bringing these regimes together and locating them at the centre of its enquiry. Drawing on data obtained through the Freedom of Information Act 2000, this paper consequently examines the functions and prevalence of charging regimes, arguing that they contribute to an economy of financial power which has significant implications for understandings of criminalisation and immigration enforcement.
published_date 2020-03-01T04:06:11Z
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score 10.88812