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Spatial and seasonal distribution patterns of native and introduced aquatic species based on environmental DNA / Teja Muha

Swansea University Author: Teja Muha

DOI (Published version): 10.23889/suthesis.52895

Abstract

The analysis of environmental DNA (eDNA; DNA recovered from environmental samples) is a recently developed non- invasive method used for detecting aquatic invasive and native species. Combined with barcoding or metabarcoding can be used to identify the presence of a target organism or to analyse an...

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Published: Swansea Swansea University 2019
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa52895
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first_indexed 2019-11-27T13:15:17Z
last_indexed 2020-01-09T19:48:39Z
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spelling 2019-11-27T11:05:30.4013349 v2 52895 2019-11-27 Spatial and seasonal distribution patterns of native and introduced aquatic species based on environmental DNA ca8a1e951fd35e7d6efa7e2b7db20d1c 0000-0002-6364-2751 Teja Muha Teja Muha true false 2019-11-27 SBI The analysis of environmental DNA (eDNA; DNA recovered from environmental samples) is a recently developed non- invasive method used for detecting aquatic invasive and native species. Combined with barcoding or metabarcoding can be used to identify the presence of a target organism or to analyse an entire community, by estimating species presence/ absence and relative abundance, providing information for aquatic species management. The main aim was the optimisation of eDNA methods for assessing spatial and seasonal distribution of aquatic native and invasive species, focusing on hotspots of marine invasive species and on the distribution of fish species in rivers. An initial study on optimisation of eDNA capturing protocols, determined that sampling a large but feasible volume of water by combining syringe filtration with ethanol- sodium acetate precipitation was the most optimal strategy. Using this method of eDNA extraction and metabarcoding, a second study analysed river restoration success, after a recently removed weir, to identify changes in the abundance of freshwater fish, with no evidence of weir impacting fish discontinuity patterns, before or after removal. A similar approach analysing the role of obstacles on fish distribution in rivers with contrasting levels of fragmentation, indicated that both natural and artificial barriers resulted in limited fish community composition upstream compared to downstream, particularly for non-migratory species, with the migratory salmonid species being able of upstream passage in both of the rivers. Finally, the application of eDNA and barcoding for early detection and monitoring of invasive seaweed, indicated that native and invasive Codium spp. displayed significant seasonal and spatial differentiation, which could explain the establishment success of the non-native species. The results of this thesis establish the usefulness of environmental DNA spatial and seasonal dispersal assessment of aquatic species and suggests new avenues for eDNA future applications, such as providing data for spatial modelling. Thesis Swansea University Swansea Molecular ecology, environmental DNA, sequencing, spatial assessment, barcoding, metabarcoding, invasive species 1 10 2019 2019-10-01 10.23889/suthesis.52895 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University Consuegra, Sonia ; Garcia de Leaniz, Carlos Doctoral Ph.D This work received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Aquainvad-ED project, the Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant agreement No 642197 2019-11-27T10:49:06.5590695 2019-11-27T10:49:06.5590695 Teja Muha 0000-0002-6364-2751 1 52895__15983__b34d6f8ef6eb4e4eb60e29f83913fdf6.pdf Muha_Teja_P_PhD_Thesis_Final.pdf 2019-11-27T11:05:30.4013349 Output 7474974 application/pdf E-Thesis – open access true 2020-09-01T00:00:00.0000000 true
title Spatial and seasonal distribution patterns of native and introduced aquatic species based on environmental DNA
spellingShingle Spatial and seasonal distribution patterns of native and introduced aquatic species based on environmental DNA
Teja, Muha
title_short Spatial and seasonal distribution patterns of native and introduced aquatic species based on environmental DNA
title_full Spatial and seasonal distribution patterns of native and introduced aquatic species based on environmental DNA
title_fullStr Spatial and seasonal distribution patterns of native and introduced aquatic species based on environmental DNA
title_full_unstemmed Spatial and seasonal distribution patterns of native and introduced aquatic species based on environmental DNA
title_sort Spatial and seasonal distribution patterns of native and introduced aquatic species based on environmental DNA
author_id_str_mv ca8a1e951fd35e7d6efa7e2b7db20d1c
author_id_fullname_str_mv ca8a1e951fd35e7d6efa7e2b7db20d1c_***_Teja, Muha
author Teja, Muha
author2 Teja Muha
format Staff Thesis
publishDate 2019
institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.23889/suthesis.52895
publisher Swansea University
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description The analysis of environmental DNA (eDNA; DNA recovered from environmental samples) is a recently developed non- invasive method used for detecting aquatic invasive and native species. Combined with barcoding or metabarcoding can be used to identify the presence of a target organism or to analyse an entire community, by estimating species presence/ absence and relative abundance, providing information for aquatic species management. The main aim was the optimisation of eDNA methods for assessing spatial and seasonal distribution of aquatic native and invasive species, focusing on hotspots of marine invasive species and on the distribution of fish species in rivers. An initial study on optimisation of eDNA capturing protocols, determined that sampling a large but feasible volume of water by combining syringe filtration with ethanol- sodium acetate precipitation was the most optimal strategy. Using this method of eDNA extraction and metabarcoding, a second study analysed river restoration success, after a recently removed weir, to identify changes in the abundance of freshwater fish, with no evidence of weir impacting fish discontinuity patterns, before or after removal. A similar approach analysing the role of obstacles on fish distribution in rivers with contrasting levels of fragmentation, indicated that both natural and artificial barriers resulted in limited fish community composition upstream compared to downstream, particularly for non-migratory species, with the migratory salmonid species being able of upstream passage in both of the rivers. Finally, the application of eDNA and barcoding for early detection and monitoring of invasive seaweed, indicated that native and invasive Codium spp. displayed significant seasonal and spatial differentiation, which could explain the establishment success of the non-native species. The results of this thesis establish the usefulness of environmental DNA spatial and seasonal dispersal assessment of aquatic species and suggests new avenues for eDNA future applications, such as providing data for spatial modelling.
published_date 2019-10-01T04:18:23Z
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