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Combining scanning tunneling microscope (STM) imaging and local manipulation to probe the high dose oxidation structure of the Si(111)-7×7 surface

Dogan Kaya, Richard Cobley Orcid Logo, Richard Palmer Orcid Logo

Nano Research, Volume: 13, Issue: 1, Pages: 145 - 150

Swansea University Authors: Richard Cobley Orcid Logo, Richard Palmer Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Understanding the atomistic formation of oxide layers on semiconductors is important for thin film fabrication, scaling down conventional devices and for the integration of emerging research materials. Here, the initial oxidation of Si(111) is studied using the scanning tunneling microscope. Prior t...

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Published in: Nano Research
ISSN: 1998-0124 1998-0000
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa53137
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spelling 2020-10-29T13:21:06.7053813 v2 53137 2020-01-07 Combining scanning tunneling microscope (STM) imaging and local manipulation to probe the high dose oxidation structure of the Si(111)-7×7 surface 2ce7e1dd9006164425415a35fa452494 0000-0003-4833-8492 Richard Cobley Richard Cobley true false 6ae369618efc7424d9774377536ea519 0000-0001-8728-8083 Richard Palmer Richard Palmer true false 2020-01-07 EEEG Understanding the atomistic formation of oxide layers on semiconductors is important for thin film fabrication, scaling down conventional devices and for the integration of emerging research materials. Here, the initial oxidation of Si(111) is studied using the scanning tunneling microscope. Prior to the complete saturation of the silicon surface with oxygen, we are able to probe the atomic nature of the oxide layer formation. We establish the threshold for local manipulation of inserted oxygen sites to be +3.8 V. Only by combining imaging with local atomic manipulation are we able to determine whether inserted oxygen exists beneath surface-bonded oxygen sites and differentiate between sites that have one and more than one oxygen atom inserted beneath the surface. Prior to the creation of the thin oxide film we observe a flip in the manipulation rates of inserted oxygen sites consistent with more oxygen inserting beneath the silicon surface. Journal Article Nano Research 13 1 145 150 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 1998-0124 1998-0000 scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), local manipulation, Si(111), oxidation 2 1 2020 2020-01-02 10.1007/s12274-019-2587-1 COLLEGE NANME Electronic and Electrical Engineering COLLEGE CODE EEEG Swansea University 2020-10-29T13:21:06.7053813 2020-01-07T14:53:50.9151266 College of Engineering Engineering Dogan Kaya 1 Richard Cobley 0000-0003-4833-8492 2 Richard Palmer 0000-0001-8728-8083 3 53137__16222__70a1081dd2df425880326cc13a0063e6.pdf Kaya2020.pdf 2020-01-07T14:55:06.4877607 Output 1868364 application/pdf Version of Record true Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY). true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Combining scanning tunneling microscope (STM) imaging and local manipulation to probe the high dose oxidation structure of the Si(111)-7×7 surface
spellingShingle Combining scanning tunneling microscope (STM) imaging and local manipulation to probe the high dose oxidation structure of the Si(111)-7×7 surface
Richard Cobley
Richard Palmer
title_short Combining scanning tunneling microscope (STM) imaging and local manipulation to probe the high dose oxidation structure of the Si(111)-7×7 surface
title_full Combining scanning tunneling microscope (STM) imaging and local manipulation to probe the high dose oxidation structure of the Si(111)-7×7 surface
title_fullStr Combining scanning tunneling microscope (STM) imaging and local manipulation to probe the high dose oxidation structure of the Si(111)-7×7 surface
title_full_unstemmed Combining scanning tunneling microscope (STM) imaging and local manipulation to probe the high dose oxidation structure of the Si(111)-7×7 surface
title_sort Combining scanning tunneling microscope (STM) imaging and local manipulation to probe the high dose oxidation structure of the Si(111)-7×7 surface
author_id_str_mv 2ce7e1dd9006164425415a35fa452494
6ae369618efc7424d9774377536ea519
author_id_fullname_str_mv 2ce7e1dd9006164425415a35fa452494_***_Richard Cobley
6ae369618efc7424d9774377536ea519_***_Richard Palmer
author Richard Cobley
Richard Palmer
author2 Dogan Kaya
Richard Cobley
Richard Palmer
format Journal article
container_title Nano Research
container_volume 13
container_issue 1
container_start_page 145
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 1998-0124
1998-0000
doi_str_mv 10.1007/s12274-019-2587-1
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Engineering{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Engineering
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description Understanding the atomistic formation of oxide layers on semiconductors is important for thin film fabrication, scaling down conventional devices and for the integration of emerging research materials. Here, the initial oxidation of Si(111) is studied using the scanning tunneling microscope. Prior to the complete saturation of the silicon surface with oxygen, we are able to probe the atomic nature of the oxide layer formation. We establish the threshold for local manipulation of inserted oxygen sites to be +3.8 V. Only by combining imaging with local atomic manipulation are we able to determine whether inserted oxygen exists beneath surface-bonded oxygen sites and differentiate between sites that have one and more than one oxygen atom inserted beneath the surface. Prior to the creation of the thin oxide film we observe a flip in the manipulation rates of inserted oxygen sites consistent with more oxygen inserting beneath the silicon surface.
published_date 2020-01-02T04:23:49Z
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score 10.8721