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Defining Acute Kidney Injury Episodes

Gareth Davies Orcid Logo, Timothy Scale, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, James Chess, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo

International Journal of Population Data Science, Volume: 4, Issue: 3

Swansea University Authors: Gareth Davies Orcid Logo, Ashley Akbari Orcid Logo, Ronan Lyons Orcid Logo

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Abstract

BackgroundAcute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a common, serious condition effecting up to 20% of all hospital admissions in the UK. AKI has an agreed definition for its recognition, however there is no consensus for the duration of an AKI episode.Main AimTo describe four different potential definitions of...

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Published in: International Journal of Population Data Science
ISSN: 2399-4908
Published: Swansea University 2019
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa53659
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Abstract: BackgroundAcute Kidney Injury (AKI) is a common, serious condition effecting up to 20% of all hospital admissions in the UK. AKI has an agreed definition for its recognition, however there is no consensus for the duration of an AKI episode.Main AimTo describe four different potential definitions of an AKI episode.MethodWe identified AKI using an SQL (Structured Query Language) based algorithm (an implementation of the NHS England eAlert algorithm) applied to serum creatinine (SCr) results from a South Wales population of ~518,000 people, held in the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank. Using a person’s index AKI case, we applied four different rules to define an episode of AKI. These definitions are: ALERTS - until they no longer trigger an AKI eAlert, 90 DAYS - until 90 days post first AKI test and <1.2/<1.5 until the SCr recovers to <1.2 or 1.5 times their baseline creatinine.ResultsThere were 1,832,122 SCr tests in 340,908 people between 2011-2013, of which 93,843 were alerts (5.12%). This fell to 81,948 alerts in 21,979 patients when dialysis and transplant patients were excluded. Of these patients with AKI 7,792 (35.5%) were dead at 1 year after their first episode. There were 31,505, 33,759, 26,657, 34,904 episodes in patients by <1.2, <1.5, 90 Days and ALERTS definitions respectively.ConclusionAKI episodes can be created in SAIL using SQL, and by adjusting the definition we see a variation in the number of episodes that a patient experiences. Once described, this cohort can be used to define a gold standard for AKI in future analysis.
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 3