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Time-efficient and computer-guided sprint interval exercise training for improving health in the workplace: a randomised mixed-methods feasibility study in office-based employees

Richard Metcalfe Orcid Logo, Hady Atef, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo, Gemma Ryde, Denise Hill Orcid Logo, Niels B. J. Vollaard

BMC Public Health, Volume: 20, Issue: 1

Swansea University Authors: Richard Metcalfe Orcid Logo, Kelly Mackintosh Orcid Logo, Melitta McNarry Orcid Logo, Denise Hill Orcid Logo

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Abstract

BackgroundThe efficacy of high-intensity interval training (HIT) as a time-efficient exercise strategy for beneficially modifying risk factors for cardiovascular disease has repeatedly been demonstrated in controlled laboratory settings. However, the effectiveness of HIT in an unsupervised workplace...

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Published in: BMC Public Health
ISSN: 1471-2458
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2020
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However, the effectiveness of HIT in an unsupervised workplace setting has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to use mixed methods to investigate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a short-duration, high-intensity exercise intervention (REHIT) when applied unsupervised in a workplace setting.MethodsTwenty-five office-workers (mean&#x2009;&#xB1;&#x2009;SD age: 47&#x2009;&#xB1;&#x2009;9 y, BMI: 27.5&#x2009;&#xB1;&#x2009;4.4&#x2009;kg&#xB7;m&#x2212;&#x2009;2, V&#x307;O2max: 28&#x2009;&#xB1;&#x2009;7&#x2009;mL&#xB7;kg&#x2212;&#x2009;1&#xB7;min&#x2212;&#x2009;1) completed a 6-week REHIT intervention unsupervised in their workplace (n&#x2009;=&#x2009;13, 6 men), or acted as a no-intervention control (n&#x2009;=&#x2009;12, 6 men). The intervention consisted of 2 sessions/week of low-intensity (~&#x2009;25&#x2009;W) cycling interspersed with 2 &#x2018;all-out&#x2019; sprints, increasing in duration from 10 to 20&#x2009;s per sprint over the 6&#x2009;weeks (total time-commitment: 8:40&#x2009;min per session). V&#x307;O2max was assessed pre- and post-training, whilst questionnaire-based measures of exercise enjoyment, self-efficacy, and acceptability were completed post-training. Eight participants also completed post-intervention semi-structured interviews.ResultsV&#x307;O2max significantly improved in the exercise group (2.25&#x2009;&#xB1;&#x2009;0.75&#x2009;L&#xB7;min&#x2212;&#x2009;1 vs. 2.42&#x2009;&#xB1;&#x2009;0.82&#x2009;L&#xB7;min&#x2212;&#x2009;1; +&#x2009;7.4%) compared to the control group (2.22&#x2009;&#xB1;&#x2009;0.72&#x2009;L&#xB7;min&#x2212;&#x2009;1 vs. 2.17&#x2009;&#xB1;&#x2009;0.74&#x2009;L&#xB7;min&#x2212;&#x2009;1; &#x2212;&#x2009;2.3%; time*intervention interaction effect: p&#x2009;&lt;&#x2009;0.01). Participants considered the REHIT intervention acceptable and enjoyable (PACES: 89&#x2009;&#xB1;&#x2009;17 out of 119) and were confident in their ability to continue to perform REHIT (7.8&#x2009;&#xB1;&#x2009;1.2 out of 9). Qualitative data revealed that REHIT offered a time-efficient opportunity to exercise, that was perceived as achievable, and which encouraged highly valued post-exercise outcomes (e.g. progress towards health/fitness benefits).ConclusionsREHIT could be implemented as a feasible, effective and acceptable exercise intervention in a workplace setting, with a total time-commitment of &lt;&#x2009;20&#x2009;min/week. Consideration of certain psycho-social factors and behaviour-change techniques may ensure adherence to the REHIT programme in the long term.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>BMC Public Health</journal><volume>20</volume><journalNumber>1</journalNumber><publisher>Springer Science and Business Media LLC</publisher><issnElectronic>1471-2458</issnElectronic><keywords>Exercise; High-intensity interval training; Workplace health; Effectiveness; Feasibility; Acceptability; Cardiorespiratory fitness</keywords><publishedDay>12</publishedDay><publishedMonth>3</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2020</publishedYear><publishedDate>2020-03-12</publishedDate><doi>10.1186/s12889-020-8444-z</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2020-09-21T16:12:36.9260637</lastEdited><Created>2020-03-03T17:15:39.3326572</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Sports Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Richard</firstname><surname>Metcalfe</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0980-2977</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Hady</firstname><surname>Atef</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0355-6357</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0813-7477</orcid><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Gemma</firstname><surname>Ryde</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Denise</firstname><surname>Hill</surname><orcid>0000-0001-8580-4048</orcid><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Niels B. 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spelling 2020-09-21T16:12:36.9260637 v2 53718 2020-03-03 Time-efficient and computer-guided sprint interval exercise training for improving health in the workplace: a randomised mixed-methods feasibility study in office-based employees 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf 0000-0003-0980-2977 Richard Metcalfe Richard Metcalfe true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false 9bca603dad273604f16acfb1178b1d83 0000-0001-8580-4048 Denise Hill Denise Hill true false 2020-03-03 STSC BackgroundThe efficacy of high-intensity interval training (HIT) as a time-efficient exercise strategy for beneficially modifying risk factors for cardiovascular disease has repeatedly been demonstrated in controlled laboratory settings. However, the effectiveness of HIT in an unsupervised workplace setting has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to use mixed methods to investigate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a short-duration, high-intensity exercise intervention (REHIT) when applied unsupervised in a workplace setting.MethodsTwenty-five office-workers (mean ± SD age: 47 ± 9 y, BMI: 27.5 ± 4.4 kg·m− 2, V̇O2max: 28 ± 7 mL·kg− 1·min− 1) completed a 6-week REHIT intervention unsupervised in their workplace (n = 13, 6 men), or acted as a no-intervention control (n = 12, 6 men). The intervention consisted of 2 sessions/week of low-intensity (~ 25 W) cycling interspersed with 2 ‘all-out’ sprints, increasing in duration from 10 to 20 s per sprint over the 6 weeks (total time-commitment: 8:40 min per session). V̇O2max was assessed pre- and post-training, whilst questionnaire-based measures of exercise enjoyment, self-efficacy, and acceptability were completed post-training. Eight participants also completed post-intervention semi-structured interviews.ResultsV̇O2max significantly improved in the exercise group (2.25 ± 0.75 L·min− 1 vs. 2.42 ± 0.82 L·min− 1; + 7.4%) compared to the control group (2.22 ± 0.72 L·min− 1 vs. 2.17 ± 0.74 L·min− 1; − 2.3%; time*intervention interaction effect: p < 0.01). Participants considered the REHIT intervention acceptable and enjoyable (PACES: 89 ± 17 out of 119) and were confident in their ability to continue to perform REHIT (7.8 ± 1.2 out of 9). Qualitative data revealed that REHIT offered a time-efficient opportunity to exercise, that was perceived as achievable, and which encouraged highly valued post-exercise outcomes (e.g. progress towards health/fitness benefits).ConclusionsREHIT could be implemented as a feasible, effective and acceptable exercise intervention in a workplace setting, with a total time-commitment of < 20 min/week. Consideration of certain psycho-social factors and behaviour-change techniques may ensure adherence to the REHIT programme in the long term. Journal Article BMC Public Health 20 1 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 1471-2458 Exercise; High-intensity interval training; Workplace health; Effectiveness; Feasibility; Acceptability; Cardiorespiratory fitness 12 3 2020 2020-03-12 10.1186/s12889-020-8444-z COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2020-09-21T16:12:36.9260637 2020-03-03T17:15:39.3326572 College of Engineering Sports Science Richard Metcalfe 0000-0003-0980-2977 1 Hady Atef 2 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 3 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 4 Gemma Ryde 5 Denise Hill 0000-0001-8580-4048 6 Niels B. J. Vollaard 7 53718__16847__99ec2eaaa8f7433795d4ebc4cb482648.pdf 53718.pdf 2020-03-13T12:58:58.1439599 Output 836324 application/pdf Version of Record true Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY). true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Time-efficient and computer-guided sprint interval exercise training for improving health in the workplace: a randomised mixed-methods feasibility study in office-based employees
spellingShingle Time-efficient and computer-guided sprint interval exercise training for improving health in the workplace: a randomised mixed-methods feasibility study in office-based employees
Richard Metcalfe
Kelly Mackintosh
Melitta McNarry
Denise Hill
title_short Time-efficient and computer-guided sprint interval exercise training for improving health in the workplace: a randomised mixed-methods feasibility study in office-based employees
title_full Time-efficient and computer-guided sprint interval exercise training for improving health in the workplace: a randomised mixed-methods feasibility study in office-based employees
title_fullStr Time-efficient and computer-guided sprint interval exercise training for improving health in the workplace: a randomised mixed-methods feasibility study in office-based employees
title_full_unstemmed Time-efficient and computer-guided sprint interval exercise training for improving health in the workplace: a randomised mixed-methods feasibility study in office-based employees
title_sort Time-efficient and computer-guided sprint interval exercise training for improving health in the workplace: a randomised mixed-methods feasibility study in office-based employees
author_id_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
9bca603dad273604f16acfb1178b1d83
author_id_fullname_str_mv 9bb783273dd9d54a2f3f66f75c43abdf_***_Richard Metcalfe
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly Mackintosh
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta McNarry
9bca603dad273604f16acfb1178b1d83_***_Denise Hill
author Richard Metcalfe
Kelly Mackintosh
Melitta McNarry
Denise Hill
author2 Richard Metcalfe
Hady Atef
Kelly Mackintosh
Melitta McNarry
Gemma Ryde
Denise Hill
Niels B. J. Vollaard
format Journal article
container_title BMC Public Health
container_volume 20
container_issue 1
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 1471-2458
doi_str_mv 10.1186/s12889-020-8444-z
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
college_str College of Engineering
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 1
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description BackgroundThe efficacy of high-intensity interval training (HIT) as a time-efficient exercise strategy for beneficially modifying risk factors for cardiovascular disease has repeatedly been demonstrated in controlled laboratory settings. However, the effectiveness of HIT in an unsupervised workplace setting has not been investigated. The objective of this study was to use mixed methods to investigate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a short-duration, high-intensity exercise intervention (REHIT) when applied unsupervised in a workplace setting.MethodsTwenty-five office-workers (mean ± SD age: 47 ± 9 y, BMI: 27.5 ± 4.4 kg·m− 2, V̇O2max: 28 ± 7 mL·kg− 1·min− 1) completed a 6-week REHIT intervention unsupervised in their workplace (n = 13, 6 men), or acted as a no-intervention control (n = 12, 6 men). The intervention consisted of 2 sessions/week of low-intensity (~ 25 W) cycling interspersed with 2 ‘all-out’ sprints, increasing in duration from 10 to 20 s per sprint over the 6 weeks (total time-commitment: 8:40 min per session). V̇O2max was assessed pre- and post-training, whilst questionnaire-based measures of exercise enjoyment, self-efficacy, and acceptability were completed post-training. Eight participants also completed post-intervention semi-structured interviews.ResultsV̇O2max significantly improved in the exercise group (2.25 ± 0.75 L·min− 1 vs. 2.42 ± 0.82 L·min− 1; + 7.4%) compared to the control group (2.22 ± 0.72 L·min− 1 vs. 2.17 ± 0.74 L·min− 1; − 2.3%; time*intervention interaction effect: p < 0.01). Participants considered the REHIT intervention acceptable and enjoyable (PACES: 89 ± 17 out of 119) and were confident in their ability to continue to perform REHIT (7.8 ± 1.2 out of 9). Qualitative data revealed that REHIT offered a time-efficient opportunity to exercise, that was perceived as achievable, and which encouraged highly valued post-exercise outcomes (e.g. progress towards health/fitness benefits).ConclusionsREHIT could be implemented as a feasible, effective and acceptable exercise intervention in a workplace setting, with a total time-commitment of < 20 min/week. Consideration of certain psycho-social factors and behaviour-change techniques may ensure adherence to the REHIT programme in the long term.
published_date 2020-03-12T04:25:19Z
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