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Editorial JTH 16 –The Coronavirus Disease COVID-19 and implications for transport and health

Charles Musselwhite Orcid Logo, Erel Avineri, Yusak Susilo

Journal of Transport & Health, Volume: 16, Start page: 100853

Swansea University Author: Charles Musselwhite Orcid Logo

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Abstract

This paper looks at how our highly connected, hypermobile society contributes to the spread of disease and the consequences of lockdown on curtailing such hypermobility might have on life, for work and also for fulfilling everyday duties, getting shopping in and seeing friends and family. Who knows...

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Published in: Journal of Transport & Health
ISSN: 2214-1405
Published: Elsevier BV 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa53903
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Abstract: This paper looks at how our highly connected, hypermobile society contributes to the spread of disease and the consequences of lockdown on curtailing such hypermobility might have on life, for work and also for fulfilling everyday duties, getting shopping in and seeing friends and family. Who knows at the moment how long such a lock down will be for in many countries, and further what effect it will have on changing our mobility patterns forever. Will we get used to virtual meetings being the norm for office workers, will we want to connect to local communities more than those far away, will we notice and enjoy cleaner air from less pollution in reduction in transport movement and want to sustain this afterwards? But, given the benefits of mobility are not distributed equally, the disbenefits of mobility lock-down are likely to be faced differently by different populations.Reducing hypermobility of our transport networking and focussing on local connectivity seems a reasonable solution from this. If we are to face increasing threat from viruses we need to have strong social and local economic capital in strong local communities and neighbourhoods to support one another without recourse to hypermobility. Perhaps a move to a more sustainable hypomobile practice is desired, a slow mobility focus, with more localised active mobility.
Keywords: transport, mobility, public transport, health, active travel
College: Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
Start Page: 100853