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Whipworms of south-east Asian rodents are distinct from Trichuris muris

Alexis Ribas, Konstans Wells Orcid Logo, Serge Morand, Kittipong Chaisiri, Takeshi Agatsuma, Maklarin B. Lakim, Fred Y. Yuh Tuh, Weerachai Saijuntha

Parasitology International, Volume: 77, Start page: 102128

Swansea University Author: Konstans Wells Orcid Logo

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Abstract

The whipworm Trichuris muris is known to be associated with various rodent species in the northern hemisphere, but the species identity of whipworm infecting rodents in the Oriental region remains largely unknown. We collected Trichuris of Muridae rodents in mainland and insular Southeast Asia betwe...

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Published in: Parasitology International
ISSN: 1383-5769
Published: Elsevier BV 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54018
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Abstract: The whipworm Trichuris muris is known to be associated with various rodent species in the northern hemisphere, but the species identity of whipworm infecting rodents in the Oriental region remains largely unknown. We collected Trichuris of Muridae rodents in mainland and insular Southeast Asia between 2008 and 2015 and used molecular and morphological approaches to identify the systematic position of new specimens. We discovered two new species that were clearly distinct from T. muris, both in terms of molecular phylogenetic clustering and morphological features, with one species found in Thailand and another one in Borneo. We named the new species from Thailand as Trichuris cossoni and the species from Borneo as Trichuris arrizabalagai. Molecular phylogeny using internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) showed a divergence between T. arrizabalagai n. sp., T. cossoni n. sp. and T. muris. Our findings of phylogeographically distinct Trichuris species despite some globally distributed host species requires further research into the distribution of different species, previously assumed to belong to T. muris, which has particular relevance for using these species as laboratory model organisms.
Keywords: Trichuris; Borneo; Thailand; Ribosomal DNA; Helminth diversity; Phylogeography
College: College of Science
Start Page: 102128