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Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Thermochemical Storage Materials

Sara Walsh, Jack Reynolds, Bahaa Abbas, Rachel Woods, Justin Searle Orcid Logo, Eifion Jewell Orcid Logo, Jonathon Elvins

Energies, Volume: 13, Issue: 9, Start page: 2202

Swansea University Authors: Sara Walsh, Bahaa Abbas, Rachel Woods, Justin Searle Orcid Logo, Eifion Jewell Orcid Logo, Jonathon Elvins

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/en13092202

Abstract

Thermochemical storage provides a volumetric and cost-efficient means of collecting energy from solar/waste heat in order to utilize it for space heating in another location. Equally important to the storage density, the dynamic thermal response dictates the power available which is critical to meet...

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Published in: Energies
ISSN: 1996-1073
Published: MDPI AG 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54127
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Equally important to the storage density, the dynamic thermal response dictates the power available which is critical to meet the varied demands of a practical space heating application. Using a laboratory scale reactor (127 cm3), an experimental study with salt in matrix (SIM) materials found that the reactor power response is primarily governed by the flow rate of moist air through the reactor and that creating salt with a higher salt fraction had minimal impact on the thermal response. The flowrate dictates the power profile of the reactor with an optimum value which balances moisture reactant delivery and reaction rate on the SIM. A mixed particle size produced the highest power (22 W) and peak thermal uplift (32 &#xB0;C). A narrow particle range reduced the peak power and peak temperature as a result of lower packing densities of the SIM in the reactor. 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spelling 2021-08-05T16:30:46.1870928 v2 54127 2020-04-22 Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Thermochemical Storage Materials f7a10aed81ec6adf57df16246dbc01ce Sara Walsh Sara Walsh true false 70f72a44d3b1b045e0473147441a80d2 Bahaa Abbas Bahaa Abbas true false 3a788bc011d03599442c8e679a236096 Rachel Woods Rachel Woods true false 0e3f2c3812f181eaed11c45554d4cdd0 0000-0003-1101-075X Justin Searle Justin Searle true false 13dc152c178d51abfe0634445b0acf07 0000-0002-6894-2251 Eifion Jewell Eifion Jewell true false 8f619d25f6c30f8af32bc634e4775e21 Jonathon Elvins Jonathon Elvins true false 2020-04-22 CHEG Thermochemical storage provides a volumetric and cost-efficient means of collecting energy from solar/waste heat in order to utilize it for space heating in another location. Equally important to the storage density, the dynamic thermal response dictates the power available which is critical to meet the varied demands of a practical space heating application. Using a laboratory scale reactor (127 cm3), an experimental study with salt in matrix (SIM) materials found that the reactor power response is primarily governed by the flow rate of moist air through the reactor and that creating salt with a higher salt fraction had minimal impact on the thermal response. The flowrate dictates the power profile of the reactor with an optimum value which balances moisture reactant delivery and reaction rate on the SIM. A mixed particle size produced the highest power (22 W) and peak thermal uplift (32 °C). A narrow particle range reduced the peak power and peak temperature as a result of lower packing densities of the SIM in the reactor. The scaled maximum power density which could be achieved is >150 kW/m3, but achieving this would require optimization of the solid–moist air interactions Journal Article Energies 13 9 2202 MDPI AG 1996-1073 thermochemical storage; thermal power; dynamic thermal response; hydrated salt 2 5 2020 2020-05-02 10.3390/en13092202 COLLEGE NANME Chemical Engineering COLLEGE CODE CHEG Swansea University 2021-08-05T16:30:46.1870928 2020-04-22T00:00:00.0000000 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering Sara Walsh 1 Jack Reynolds 2 Bahaa Abbas 3 Rachel Woods 4 Justin Searle 0000-0003-1101-075X 5 Eifion Jewell 0000-0002-6894-2251 6 Jonathon Elvins 7 54127__17270__3ced43ced05542ff9745b5c5a6e31ebe.pdf 54127.pdf 2020-05-18T08:32:23.2058822 Output 2882140 application/pdf Version of Record true This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC-BY). true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Thermochemical Storage Materials
spellingShingle Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Thermochemical Storage Materials
Sara Walsh
Bahaa Abbas
Rachel Woods
Justin Searle
Eifion Jewell
Jonathon Elvins
title_short Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Thermochemical Storage Materials
title_full Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Thermochemical Storage Materials
title_fullStr Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Thermochemical Storage Materials
title_full_unstemmed Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Thermochemical Storage Materials
title_sort Assessing the Dynamic Performance of Thermochemical Storage Materials
author_id_str_mv f7a10aed81ec6adf57df16246dbc01ce
70f72a44d3b1b045e0473147441a80d2
3a788bc011d03599442c8e679a236096
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author_id_fullname_str_mv f7a10aed81ec6adf57df16246dbc01ce_***_Sara Walsh
70f72a44d3b1b045e0473147441a80d2_***_Bahaa Abbas
3a788bc011d03599442c8e679a236096_***_Rachel Woods
0e3f2c3812f181eaed11c45554d4cdd0_***_Justin Searle
13dc152c178d51abfe0634445b0acf07_***_Eifion Jewell
8f619d25f6c30f8af32bc634e4775e21_***_Jonathon Elvins
author Sara Walsh
Bahaa Abbas
Rachel Woods
Justin Searle
Eifion Jewell
Jonathon Elvins
author2 Sara Walsh
Jack Reynolds
Bahaa Abbas
Rachel Woods
Justin Searle
Eifion Jewell
Jonathon Elvins
format Journal article
container_title Energies
container_volume 13
container_issue 9
container_start_page 2202
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 1996-1073
doi_str_mv 10.3390/en13092202
publisher MDPI AG
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Aerospace, Civil, Electrical, General and Mechanical Engineering - Mechanical Engineering
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description Thermochemical storage provides a volumetric and cost-efficient means of collecting energy from solar/waste heat in order to utilize it for space heating in another location. Equally important to the storage density, the dynamic thermal response dictates the power available which is critical to meet the varied demands of a practical space heating application. Using a laboratory scale reactor (127 cm3), an experimental study with salt in matrix (SIM) materials found that the reactor power response is primarily governed by the flow rate of moist air through the reactor and that creating salt with a higher salt fraction had minimal impact on the thermal response. The flowrate dictates the power profile of the reactor with an optimum value which balances moisture reactant delivery and reaction rate on the SIM. A mixed particle size produced the highest power (22 W) and peak thermal uplift (32 °C). A narrow particle range reduced the peak power and peak temperature as a result of lower packing densities of the SIM in the reactor. The scaled maximum power density which could be achieved is >150 kW/m3, but achieving this would require optimization of the solid–moist air interactions
published_date 2020-05-02T04:00:31Z
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