No Cover Image

Journal article 297 views 1 download

Towards a Characterization of ‘Race Law’ in Medieval Wales

Matthew Stevens Orcid Logo, Teresa Phipps Orcid Logo

The Journal of Legal History, Volume: 41, Issue: 3, Pages: 290 - 331

Swansea University Authors: Matthew Stevens Orcid Logo, Teresa Phipps Orcid Logo

Abstract

Welsh persons were subject to legal restrictions within and near Wales, from the point of local English conquest, c.1067–1283, until the 1536 Act of Union of England and Wales. In this article we outline modern scholars’ two main definitions of ‘race’ and ‘racism’ applicable to the Middle Ages, both...

Full description

Published in: The Journal of Legal History
ISSN: 0144-0365 1744-0564
Published: Informa UK Limited 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54190
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: Welsh persons were subject to legal restrictions within and near Wales, from the point of local English conquest, c.1067–1283, until the 1536 Act of Union of England and Wales. In this article we outline modern scholars’ two main definitions of ‘race’ and ‘racism’ applicable to the Middle Ages, both ‘race’ as a structural relationship used to essentialize and disadvantage a group and ‘race’ as a package of presumed heritable physical, mental and moral traits. We then survey discriminatory laws in Wales, characterising them as falling into four broad categories: security, economic freedom, political rights, and legal rights. The context, nature and evolution of laws within each category are discussed. We finish by testing whether this body of law amounts to ‘race law’ in light of the given definitions of ‘race’ and ‘racism’, concluding that it is race law by both definitions. An appendix of indicative race law is provided.
College: College of Arts and Humanities
Issue: 3
Start Page: 290
End Page: 331