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Trajectories of family care over the lifecourse: evidence from Canada

Janet Fast, Norah Keating Orcid Logo, Jacquie Eales, Choong Kim, Yeonjung Lee

Ageing and Society, Pages: 1 - 18

Swansea University Author: Norah Keating Orcid Logo

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Abstract

In the midst of a ‘care crisis’, attention has turned again to families who are viewed both as untapped care resources and as disappearing ones. Within this apparent policy/demographicimpasse, we test empirically theorised trajectories of family care, creating evidence of diverse patterns of care ac...

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Published in: Ageing and Society
ISSN: 0144-686X 1469-1779
Published: Bristol, UK Cambridge University Press (CUP) 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54224
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spelling 2020-12-15T11:20:31.3968456 v2 54224 2020-05-14 Trajectories of family care over the lifecourse: evidence from Canada 79aa9c79c6c3f3fa498a1d429844c45e 0000-0002-2535-4564 Norah Keating Norah Keating true false 2020-05-14 PHAC In the midst of a ‘care crisis’, attention has turned again to families who are viewed both as untapped care resources and as disappearing ones. Within this apparent policy/demographicimpasse, we test empirically theorised trajectories of family care, creating evidence of diverse patterns of care across the lifecourse. The study sample, drawn from a Statistics Canada national survey of family care, comprised all Canadians aged 65 and older who had ever provided care (N = 3,299). Latent Profile Analysis yielded five distinct care trajectories: compressed generational, broad generational, intensive parent care, careercare and serial care. They differed in age of first care experience, number of care episodes, total years of care and amount of overlap among episodes. Trajectories generally corresponded to previously hypothesised patterns but with additional characteristics that added to our understanding of diversity in lifecourse patterns of care. The five trajectoriesidentified provide the basis for further understanding how time and events unfold in various ways across lifecourses of care. A gap remains in understanding how relationships with family and social network members evolve in the context of care. A challenge is presented to policy makers to temper a ‘families by stealth’ policy approach with one that supports family carers who are integral to health and social care systems. Journal Article Ageing and Society 1 18 Cambridge University Press (CUP) Bristol, UK 0144-686X 1469-1779 family care trajectories; lifecourse; family care history 8 1 2020 2020-01-08 10.1017/s0144686x19001806 COLLEGE NANME Public Health COLLEGE CODE PHAC Swansea University Yeandle, S. et al. (2017-2021). Sustainable Care: connecting people and systems. Economic and Social Research Council, Large Grant project. 2020-12-15T11:20:31.3968456 2020-05-14T18:18:46.0330013 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences The Centre for Innovative Ageing Janet Fast 1 Norah Keating 0000-0002-2535-4564 2 Jacquie Eales 3 Choong Kim 4 Yeonjung Lee 5 54224__17240__87466b6dc43346cb860c74bdf742d6a1.pdf Fast et al 2020 Family care trajectoriesPUBLISHED.pdf 2020-05-14T18:51:48.1949105 Output 408870 application/pdf Version of Record true Released under the terms of a Creative Commons Attribution licence (CC-BY). true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Trajectories of family care over the lifecourse: evidence from Canada
spellingShingle Trajectories of family care over the lifecourse: evidence from Canada
Norah Keating
title_short Trajectories of family care over the lifecourse: evidence from Canada
title_full Trajectories of family care over the lifecourse: evidence from Canada
title_fullStr Trajectories of family care over the lifecourse: evidence from Canada
title_full_unstemmed Trajectories of family care over the lifecourse: evidence from Canada
title_sort Trajectories of family care over the lifecourse: evidence from Canada
author_id_str_mv 79aa9c79c6c3f3fa498a1d429844c45e
author_id_fullname_str_mv 79aa9c79c6c3f3fa498a1d429844c45e_***_Norah Keating
author Norah Keating
author2 Janet Fast
Norah Keating
Jacquie Eales
Choong Kim
Yeonjung Lee
format Journal article
container_title Ageing and Society
container_start_page 1
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 0144-686X
1469-1779
doi_str_mv 10.1017/s0144686x19001806
publisher Cambridge University Press (CUP)
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str The Centre for Innovative Ageing{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}The Centre for Innovative Ageing
document_store_str 1
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description In the midst of a ‘care crisis’, attention has turned again to families who are viewed both as untapped care resources and as disappearing ones. Within this apparent policy/demographicimpasse, we test empirically theorised trajectories of family care, creating evidence of diverse patterns of care across the lifecourse. The study sample, drawn from a Statistics Canada national survey of family care, comprised all Canadians aged 65 and older who had ever provided care (N = 3,299). Latent Profile Analysis yielded five distinct care trajectories: compressed generational, broad generational, intensive parent care, careercare and serial care. They differed in age of first care experience, number of care episodes, total years of care and amount of overlap among episodes. Trajectories generally corresponded to previously hypothesised patterns but with additional characteristics that added to our understanding of diversity in lifecourse patterns of care. The five trajectoriesidentified provide the basis for further understanding how time and events unfold in various ways across lifecourses of care. A gap remains in understanding how relationships with family and social network members evolve in the context of care. A challenge is presented to policy makers to temper a ‘families by stealth’ policy approach with one that supports family carers who are integral to health and social care systems.
published_date 2020-01-08T04:00:51Z
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