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Inferring cost of transport from whole-body kinematics in three sympatric turtle species with different locomotor habits / William I. Sellers, Kayleigh Rose, Dane A. Crossley, Jonathan R. Codd

Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology, Volume: 247, Start page: 110739

Swansea University Author: Kayleigh Rose

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Abstract

Chelonians are mechanically unusual vertebrates as an exoskeleton limits their body wall mobility. They generallymove slowly on land and have aquatic or semi-aquatic lifestyles. Somewhat surprisingly, the limitedexperimental work that has been done suggests that their energetic cost of transport (Co...

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Published in: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology
ISSN: 1095-6433
Published: Elsevier BV 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54311
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Abstract: Chelonians are mechanically unusual vertebrates as an exoskeleton limits their body wall mobility. They generallymove slowly on land and have aquatic or semi-aquatic lifestyles. Somewhat surprisingly, the limitedexperimental work that has been done suggests that their energetic cost of transport (CoT) are relatively low.This study examines the mechanical evidence for CoT in three turtle species that have differing degrees ofterrestrial activity. Our results show that Apolone travels faster than the other two species, and that Chelydra hashigher levels of yaw. All the species show poor mean levels of energy recovery, and, whilst there is considerablevariation, never show the high levels of energy recovery seen in cursorial quadrupeds. The mean mechanical CoTis 2 to 4 times higher than is generally seen in terrestrial animals. We therefore find no mechanical support for alow CoT in these species. This study illustrates the need for research on a wider range of chelonians to discoverwhether there are indeed general trends in mechanical and metabolic energy costs.
Keywords: Kinematics; Energy recovery; Walking; Biomechanics
Start Page: 110739