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Underwater blast loading of partially submerged sandwich composite materials in relation to air blast loading response / Emily Rolfe, Robert Quinn, George Irven, David Brick, John P. Dear, Hari Arora

International Journal of Lightweight Materials and Manufacture, Volume: 3, Issue: 4, Pages: 387 - 402

Swansea University Author: Hari Arora

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Abstract

The research presented in this paper focusses on the underwater blast resilience of a hybrid composite sandwich panel, consisting of both glass-fibre and carbon-fibre. The hybrid fibres were selected to optimise strength and stiffness during blast loading by promoting fibre interactions. In the blas...

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Published in: International Journal of Lightweight Materials and Manufacture
ISSN: 2588-8404
Published: Elsevier BV 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54404
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2020-07-23T10:35:05.0458684</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>54404</id><entry>2020-06-08</entry><title>Underwater blast loading of partially submerged sandwich composite materials in relation to air blast loading response</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>ed7371c768e9746008a6807f9f7a1555</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-9790-0907</ORCID><firstname>Hari</firstname><surname>Arora</surname><name>Hari Arora</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2020-06-08</date><deptcode>MEDE</deptcode><abstract>The research presented in this paper focusses on the underwater blast resilience of a hybrid composite sandwich panel, consisting of both glass-fibre and carbon-fibre. The hybrid fibres were selected to optimise strength and stiffness during blast loading by promoting fibre interactions. In the blast experiment, the aim was to capture full-field panel deflection during large-scale underwater blast using high-speed 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The composite sandwich panel was partially submerged and subjected to a 1 kg PE7 charge at 1 m stand-off. The charge was aligned with the centre of the panel at a depth of 275 mm and mimicked the effect of a near-field subsurface mine. The DIC deflection data shows that the horizontal cross-section of the panel deforms in a parabolic shape until excessive deflection causes core shear cracking. The panel then forms the commonly observed &#x201C;bathtub&#x201D; deformation shape. DIC data highlighted the expected differences in initial conditions compared to air-blast experiments, including the pre-strains caused by the mass of water (hydrostatic pressure). Furthermore, water depth was shown to significantly influence panel deflection, strain and hence damage sustained under these conditions. Panel deformations and damage after blast was progressively more severe in regions deeper underwater, as pressures were higher and decayed slower compared to regions near the free surface.An identical hybrid composite sandwich panel was subjected to air blast; one panel underwent two 8 kg PE7 charges in succession at 8 m stand-off. DIC was also implemented to record the panel deformations during air blast. The air and underwater blast tests represent two different regimes of blast loading: one far-field in air and one near-field underwater. The difference in deflection development, caused by the differing fluid mediums and stand-off distances, is apparent from the full-field results. During underwater blast the panel underwent peak pressure loading of approximately 52.6 MPa whilst during air blast the panel was subjected to 67.7 kPa followed by 68.9 kPa peak pressure loads in succession. The two experiments demonstrate the response of the same hybrid composite sandwich panel under two differing blast regimes.The post-blast damage and strength of the hybrid panels following air and underwater blasts were evaluated. Post-blast testing revealed that the underwater blast causes significantly more damage compared to air blast, particularly debonding between the skins and core. The air blast panel sustains no visible rear skin/core debonding, whereas 13 regions of rear-face debonds are identified on the underwater blast panel. Sustaining no front-skin breakage was advantageous for retaining a high proportion of the compressive modulus for this hybrid layup following underwater blast. Damage mechanisms were interrelated. Determining the most detrimental type is not straightforward in real explosive and non-idealised experiments, however debonding was understandably shown to be significant. 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spelling 2020-07-23T10:35:05.0458684 v2 54404 2020-06-08 Underwater blast loading of partially submerged sandwich composite materials in relation to air blast loading response ed7371c768e9746008a6807f9f7a1555 0000-0002-9790-0907 Hari Arora Hari Arora true false 2020-06-08 MEDE The research presented in this paper focusses on the underwater blast resilience of a hybrid composite sandwich panel, consisting of both glass-fibre and carbon-fibre. The hybrid fibres were selected to optimise strength and stiffness during blast loading by promoting fibre interactions. In the blast experiment, the aim was to capture full-field panel deflection during large-scale underwater blast using high-speed 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The composite sandwich panel was partially submerged and subjected to a 1 kg PE7 charge at 1 m stand-off. The charge was aligned with the centre of the panel at a depth of 275 mm and mimicked the effect of a near-field subsurface mine. The DIC deflection data shows that the horizontal cross-section of the panel deforms in a parabolic shape until excessive deflection causes core shear cracking. The panel then forms the commonly observed “bathtub” deformation shape. DIC data highlighted the expected differences in initial conditions compared to air-blast experiments, including the pre-strains caused by the mass of water (hydrostatic pressure). Furthermore, water depth was shown to significantly influence panel deflection, strain and hence damage sustained under these conditions. Panel deformations and damage after blast was progressively more severe in regions deeper underwater, as pressures were higher and decayed slower compared to regions near the free surface.An identical hybrid composite sandwich panel was subjected to air blast; one panel underwent two 8 kg PE7 charges in succession at 8 m stand-off. DIC was also implemented to record the panel deformations during air blast. The air and underwater blast tests represent two different regimes of blast loading: one far-field in air and one near-field underwater. The difference in deflection development, caused by the differing fluid mediums and stand-off distances, is apparent from the full-field results. During underwater blast the panel underwent peak pressure loading of approximately 52.6 MPa whilst during air blast the panel was subjected to 67.7 kPa followed by 68.9 kPa peak pressure loads in succession. The two experiments demonstrate the response of the same hybrid composite sandwich panel under two differing blast regimes.The post-blast damage and strength of the hybrid panels following air and underwater blasts were evaluated. Post-blast testing revealed that the underwater blast causes significantly more damage compared to air blast, particularly debonding between the skins and core. The air blast panel sustains no visible rear skin/core debonding, whereas 13 regions of rear-face debonds are identified on the underwater blast panel. Sustaining no front-skin breakage was advantageous for retaining a high proportion of the compressive modulus for this hybrid layup following underwater blast. Damage mechanisms were interrelated. Determining the most detrimental type is not straightforward in real explosive and non-idealised experiments, however debonding was understandably shown to be significant. A further study to isolate failure modes and improve in situ instrumentation is ongoing. Journal Article International Journal of Lightweight Materials and Manufacture 3 4 387 402 Elsevier BV 2588-8404 Underwater blast, Air blast, Composite sandwich panel, Hybrid composite, Digital image correlation 31 12 2020 2020-12-31 10.1016/j.ijlmm.2020.06.003 COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Engineering COLLEGE CODE MEDE Swansea University 2020-07-23T10:35:05.0458684 2020-06-08T12:36:09.9670298 Emily Rolfe 1 Robert Quinn 2 George Irven 3 David Brick 4 John P. Dear 5 Hari Arora 0000-0002-9790-0907 6 54404__17689__f825cd05c73c4866a00136289f849923.pdf 54404 (2).pdf 2020-07-10T11:46:15.8120779 Output 5884480 application/pdf Version of Record true ©2020 The Authors. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/) true
title Underwater blast loading of partially submerged sandwich composite materials in relation to air blast loading response
spellingShingle Underwater blast loading of partially submerged sandwich composite materials in relation to air blast loading response
Hari, Arora
title_short Underwater blast loading of partially submerged sandwich composite materials in relation to air blast loading response
title_full Underwater blast loading of partially submerged sandwich composite materials in relation to air blast loading response
title_fullStr Underwater blast loading of partially submerged sandwich composite materials in relation to air blast loading response
title_full_unstemmed Underwater blast loading of partially submerged sandwich composite materials in relation to air blast loading response
title_sort Underwater blast loading of partially submerged sandwich composite materials in relation to air blast loading response
author_id_str_mv ed7371c768e9746008a6807f9f7a1555
author_id_fullname_str_mv ed7371c768e9746008a6807f9f7a1555_***_Hari, Arora
author Hari, Arora
author2 Emily Rolfe
Robert Quinn
George Irven
David Brick
John P. Dear
Hari Arora
format Journal article
container_title International Journal of Lightweight Materials and Manufacture
container_volume 3
container_issue 4
container_start_page 387
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 2588-8404
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.ijlmm.2020.06.003
publisher Elsevier BV
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description The research presented in this paper focusses on the underwater blast resilience of a hybrid composite sandwich panel, consisting of both glass-fibre and carbon-fibre. The hybrid fibres were selected to optimise strength and stiffness during blast loading by promoting fibre interactions. In the blast experiment, the aim was to capture full-field panel deflection during large-scale underwater blast using high-speed 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The composite sandwich panel was partially submerged and subjected to a 1 kg PE7 charge at 1 m stand-off. The charge was aligned with the centre of the panel at a depth of 275 mm and mimicked the effect of a near-field subsurface mine. The DIC deflection data shows that the horizontal cross-section of the panel deforms in a parabolic shape until excessive deflection causes core shear cracking. The panel then forms the commonly observed “bathtub” deformation shape. DIC data highlighted the expected differences in initial conditions compared to air-blast experiments, including the pre-strains caused by the mass of water (hydrostatic pressure). Furthermore, water depth was shown to significantly influence panel deflection, strain and hence damage sustained under these conditions. Panel deformations and damage after blast was progressively more severe in regions deeper underwater, as pressures were higher and decayed slower compared to regions near the free surface.An identical hybrid composite sandwich panel was subjected to air blast; one panel underwent two 8 kg PE7 charges in succession at 8 m stand-off. DIC was also implemented to record the panel deformations during air blast. The air and underwater blast tests represent two different regimes of blast loading: one far-field in air and one near-field underwater. The difference in deflection development, caused by the differing fluid mediums and stand-off distances, is apparent from the full-field results. During underwater blast the panel underwent peak pressure loading of approximately 52.6 MPa whilst during air blast the panel was subjected to 67.7 kPa followed by 68.9 kPa peak pressure loads in succession. The two experiments demonstrate the response of the same hybrid composite sandwich panel under two differing blast regimes.The post-blast damage and strength of the hybrid panels following air and underwater blasts were evaluated. Post-blast testing revealed that the underwater blast causes significantly more damage compared to air blast, particularly debonding between the skins and core. The air blast panel sustains no visible rear skin/core debonding, whereas 13 regions of rear-face debonds are identified on the underwater blast panel. Sustaining no front-skin breakage was advantageous for retaining a high proportion of the compressive modulus for this hybrid layup following underwater blast. Damage mechanisms were interrelated. Determining the most detrimental type is not straightforward in real explosive and non-idealised experiments, however debonding was understandably shown to be significant. A further study to isolate failure modes and improve in situ instrumentation is ongoing.
published_date 2020-12-31T04:10:55Z
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