No Cover Image

Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 39 views 4 downloads

Mental Workload and Language Production in Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction / Yunhan Wu; Justin Edwards; Orla Cooney; Anna Bleakley; Philip R. Doyle; Leigh Clark; Daniel Rough; Benjamin R. Cowan

Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Conversational User Interfaces, Pages: 1 - 8

Swansea University Author: Leigh, Clark

DOI (Published version): 10.1145/3405755.3406118

Abstract

Through proliferation on smartphones and smart speakers, intel- ligent personal assistants (IPAs) have made speech a common in- teraction modality. Yet, due to linguistic coverage and varying lev- els of functionality, many speakers engage with IPAs using a non- native language. This may impact the...

Full description

Published in: Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Conversational User Interfaces
ISBN: 9781450375443
Published: New York, NY, USA ACM 2020
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54511
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2020-06-18T19:09:45Z
last_indexed 2020-08-18T03:18:27Z
id cronfa54511
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2020-08-17T15:17:49.3632105</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>54511</id><entry>2020-06-18</entry><title>Mental Workload and Language Production in Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>004ef41b90854a57a498549a462f13a0</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-9237-1057</ORCID><firstname>Leigh</firstname><surname>Clark</surname><name>Leigh Clark</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2020-06-18</date><deptcode>SCS</deptcode><abstract>Through proliferation on smartphones and smart speakers, intel- ligent personal assistants (IPAs) have made speech a common in- teraction modality. Yet, due to linguistic coverage and varying lev- els of functionality, many speakers engage with IPAs using a non- native language. This may impact the mental workload and pat- tern of language production displayed by non-native speakers. We present a mixed-design experiment, wherein native (L1) and non- native (L2) English speakers completed tasks with IPAs through smartphones and smart speakers. We found significantly higher mental workload for L2 speakers during IPA interactions. Contrary to our hypotheses, we found no significant differences between L1 and L2 speakers in terms of number of turns, lexical complexity, diversity, or lexical adaptation when encountering errors. These findings are discussed in relation to language production and pro- cessing load increases for L2 speakers in IPA interaction.</abstract><type>Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract</type><journal>Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Conversational User Interfaces</journal><paginationStart>1</paginationStart><paginationEnd>8</paginationEnd><publisher>ACM</publisher><placeOfPublication>New York, NY, USA</placeOfPublication><isbnPrint>9781450375443</isbnPrint><keywords>speech interface; voice user interface; intelligent personal assistants; non-native language speakers</keywords><publishedDay>22</publishedDay><publishedMonth>7</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2020</publishedYear><publishedDate>2020-07-22</publishedDate><doi>10.1145/3405755.3406118</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Computer Science</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>SCS</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><lastEdited>2020-08-17T15:17:49.3632105</lastEdited><Created>2020-06-18T13:40:53.7706782</Created><authors><author><firstname>Yunhan</firstname><surname>Wu</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Justin</firstname><surname>Edwards</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Orla</firstname><surname>Cooney</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Anna</firstname><surname>Bleakley</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Philip R.</firstname><surname>Doyle</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Leigh</firstname><surname>Clark</surname><orcid>0000-0002-9237-1057</orcid><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Daniel</firstname><surname>Rough</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Benjamin R.</firstname><surname>Cowan</surname><order>8</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>54511__17959__7978ef2cf342436599d7bcb1c05a3640.pdf</filename><originalFilename>54511.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2020-08-17T15:14:41.1851817</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>977031</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><documentNotes>&#xA9; 2020 Copyright held by the owner/author(s).</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2020-08-17T15:17:49.3632105 v2 54511 2020-06-18 Mental Workload and Language Production in Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction 004ef41b90854a57a498549a462f13a0 0000-0002-9237-1057 Leigh Clark Leigh Clark true false 2020-06-18 SCS Through proliferation on smartphones and smart speakers, intel- ligent personal assistants (IPAs) have made speech a common in- teraction modality. Yet, due to linguistic coverage and varying lev- els of functionality, many speakers engage with IPAs using a non- native language. This may impact the mental workload and pat- tern of language production displayed by non-native speakers. We present a mixed-design experiment, wherein native (L1) and non- native (L2) English speakers completed tasks with IPAs through smartphones and smart speakers. We found significantly higher mental workload for L2 speakers during IPA interactions. Contrary to our hypotheses, we found no significant differences between L1 and L2 speakers in terms of number of turns, lexical complexity, diversity, or lexical adaptation when encountering errors. These findings are discussed in relation to language production and pro- cessing load increases for L2 speakers in IPA interaction. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Conversational User Interfaces 1 8 ACM New York, NY, USA 9781450375443 speech interface; voice user interface; intelligent personal assistants; non-native language speakers 22 7 2020 2020-07-22 10.1145/3405755.3406118 COLLEGE NANME Computer Science COLLEGE CODE SCS Swansea University 2020-08-17T15:17:49.3632105 2020-06-18T13:40:53.7706782 Yunhan Wu 1 Justin Edwards 2 Orla Cooney 3 Anna Bleakley 4 Philip R. Doyle 5 Leigh Clark 0000-0002-9237-1057 6 Daniel Rough 7 Benjamin R. Cowan 8 54511__17959__7978ef2cf342436599d7bcb1c05a3640.pdf 54511.pdf 2020-08-17T15:14:41.1851817 Output 977031 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2020 Copyright held by the owner/author(s). true eng
title Mental Workload and Language Production in Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction
spellingShingle Mental Workload and Language Production in Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction
Leigh, Clark
title_short Mental Workload and Language Production in Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction
title_full Mental Workload and Language Production in Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction
title_fullStr Mental Workload and Language Production in Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction
title_full_unstemmed Mental Workload and Language Production in Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction
title_sort Mental Workload and Language Production in Non-Native Speaker IPA Interaction
author_id_str_mv 004ef41b90854a57a498549a462f13a0
author_id_fullname_str_mv 004ef41b90854a57a498549a462f13a0_***_Leigh, Clark
author Leigh, Clark
author2 Yunhan Wu
Justin Edwards
Orla Cooney
Anna Bleakley
Philip R. Doyle
Leigh Clark
Daniel Rough
Benjamin R. Cowan
format Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract
container_title Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Conversational User Interfaces
container_start_page 1
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
isbn 9781450375443
doi_str_mv 10.1145/3405755.3406118
publisher ACM
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Through proliferation on smartphones and smart speakers, intel- ligent personal assistants (IPAs) have made speech a common in- teraction modality. Yet, due to linguistic coverage and varying lev- els of functionality, many speakers engage with IPAs using a non- native language. This may impact the mental workload and pat- tern of language production displayed by non-native speakers. We present a mixed-design experiment, wherein native (L1) and non- native (L2) English speakers completed tasks with IPAs through smartphones and smart speakers. We found significantly higher mental workload for L2 speakers during IPA interactions. Contrary to our hypotheses, we found no significant differences between L1 and L2 speakers in terms of number of turns, lexical complexity, diversity, or lexical adaptation when encountering errors. These findings are discussed in relation to language production and pro- cessing load increases for L2 speakers in IPA interaction.
published_date 2020-07-22T04:14:11Z
_version_ 1684485388337414144
score 10.762932