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A novel approach to the prediction of long-term creep fracture: with application to 18Cr–12Ni–Mo steel (plate and bar) / Mark Evans

Journal of Materials Science, Volume: 44, Issue: 21, Pages: 5842 - 5851

Swansea University Author: Mark Evans

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Abstract

Designers of new power-generation plants are looking to make use of new and existing high-strength austenitic steels so that these plants can operate with much higher steam and therefore metal temperatures. However, this article shows that the recently developed Wilshire–Scharning methodology is inc...

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Published in: Journal of Materials Science
ISSN: 0022-2461
Published: 2009
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa5458
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Abstract: Designers of new power-generation plants are looking to make use of new and existing high-strength austenitic steels so that these plants can operate with much higher steam and therefore metal temperatures. However, this article shows that the recently developed Wilshire–Scharning methodology is incapable of producing accurate long-term life predictions of these materials from short-term data. This article puts forward a modification of this approach that should enable existing and newly developed austenitic stainless steels to be brought into safe operation more cost effectively and over a quicker time span. Estimation of this model showed that the activation energy for creep was dependent on whether the test stress was above or below the yield stress. Analysis of the results from tests lasting only up to 5,000 h accurately predict the creep lives for stress–temperature conditions causing failure in 100,000 h or more.
Item Description: Current Impact Factor = 1.9. Five Year Impact Factor = 1.7. Designers of new power generation plants are looking to make use existing austenitic steels so that these plants can operate with much higher steam and therefore metal temperatures. This is an important paper because it shows for the first time, that the new Wilshire methodology, once modified in the ways outlined in the paper, is capable of estimating the minimum stresses causing rupture in 100, 000 h from generated rupture data out to about only 5,000 h. This paper can be seen as part of the verification process needed before austenitic stainless steels can be bought into safe operation more cost effectively and over a quicker time scale than is currently possible
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 21
Start Page: 5842
End Page: 5851