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Intergenerational Effects on the Impacts of Technology Use in Later Life: Insights from an International, Multi-Site Study

Shannon Freeman, Hannah R. Marston, Janna Olynick, Charles Musselwhite Orcid Logo, Cory Kulczycki, Rebecca Genoe, Beibei Xiong

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume: 17, Issue: 16, Start page: 5711

Swansea University Author: Charles Musselwhite Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.3390/ijerph17165711

Abstract

As the use of technology becomes further integrated into the daily lives of all persons, including older adults, it is important to investigate how the perceptions and use of technology intersect with intergenerational relationships. Based on the international multi-centered study Technology In Late...

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Published in: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ISSN: 1660-4601
Published: MDPI AG 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa54997
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spelling 2021-08-30T14:47:58.0332856 v2 54997 2020-08-17 Intergenerational Effects on the Impacts of Technology Use in Later Life: Insights from an International, Multi-Site Study c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c 0000-0002-4831-2092 Charles Musselwhite Charles Musselwhite true false 2020-08-17 PHAC As the use of technology becomes further integrated into the daily lives of all persons, including older adults, it is important to investigate how the perceptions and use of technology intersect with intergenerational relationships. Based on the international multi-centered study Technology In Later Life (TILL), this paper emphasizes the perceptions of older adults and the interconnection between technology and intergenerational relationships are integral to social connectedness with others. Participants from rural and urban sites in Canada and the UK (n = 37) completed an online survey and attended a focus group. Descriptive and thematic analyses suggest that older adults are not technologically adverse and leverage intergenerational relationships with family and friends to adjust to new technologies and to remain connected to adult children and grandchildren, especially when there is high geographic separation between them. Participants referenced younger family members as having introduced them to, and having taught them how to use, technologies such as digital devices, computers, and social networking sites. The intergenerational support in the adoption of new technologies has important implications for helping older persons to remain independent and to age in place, in both age-friendly cities and in rural communities. The findings contribute to the growing literature in the fields of gerontology and gerontechnology on intergenerational influences and the impacts of technology use in later life and suggest the flexibility and willingness of older persons to adopt to new technologies as well as the value of intergenerational relationships for overcoming barriers to technology adoption. Journal Article International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 17 16 5711 MDPI AG 1660-4601 digital; intergenerational communication; gerontology; aging; family; cross-cultural research; qualitative research 7 8 2020 2020-08-07 10.3390/ijerph17165711 http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165711 COLLEGE NANME Public Health COLLEGE CODE PHAC Swansea University Another institution paid the OA fee Paid via University of Northern British Columbia EPSRC EP/L02185/1 2021-08-30T14:47:58.0332856 2020-08-17T12:32:44.3927729 Shannon Freeman 1 Hannah R. Marston 2 Janna Olynick 3 Charles Musselwhite 0000-0002-4831-2092 4 Cory Kulczycki 5 Rebecca Genoe 6 Beibei Xiong 7 54997__17956__4965422a27cd42a3be9ed9ff897695ad.pdf Freeman et al 2020 intergen effects of tech use.pdf 2020-08-17T12:43:43.5380605 Output 372009 application/pdf Version of Record true This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 (CC-BY). true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Intergenerational Effects on the Impacts of Technology Use in Later Life: Insights from an International, Multi-Site Study
spellingShingle Intergenerational Effects on the Impacts of Technology Use in Later Life: Insights from an International, Multi-Site Study
Charles Musselwhite
title_short Intergenerational Effects on the Impacts of Technology Use in Later Life: Insights from an International, Multi-Site Study
title_full Intergenerational Effects on the Impacts of Technology Use in Later Life: Insights from an International, Multi-Site Study
title_fullStr Intergenerational Effects on the Impacts of Technology Use in Later Life: Insights from an International, Multi-Site Study
title_full_unstemmed Intergenerational Effects on the Impacts of Technology Use in Later Life: Insights from an International, Multi-Site Study
title_sort Intergenerational Effects on the Impacts of Technology Use in Later Life: Insights from an International, Multi-Site Study
author_id_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c
author_id_fullname_str_mv c9a49f25a5adb54c55612ae49560100c_***_Charles Musselwhite
author Charles Musselwhite
author2 Shannon Freeman
Hannah R. Marston
Janna Olynick
Charles Musselwhite
Cory Kulczycki
Rebecca Genoe
Beibei Xiong
format Journal article
container_title International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
container_volume 17
container_issue 16
container_start_page 5711
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 1660-4601
doi_str_mv 10.3390/ijerph17165711
publisher MDPI AG
url http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165711
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description As the use of technology becomes further integrated into the daily lives of all persons, including older adults, it is important to investigate how the perceptions and use of technology intersect with intergenerational relationships. Based on the international multi-centered study Technology In Later Life (TILL), this paper emphasizes the perceptions of older adults and the interconnection between technology and intergenerational relationships are integral to social connectedness with others. Participants from rural and urban sites in Canada and the UK (n = 37) completed an online survey and attended a focus group. Descriptive and thematic analyses suggest that older adults are not technologically adverse and leverage intergenerational relationships with family and friends to adjust to new technologies and to remain connected to adult children and grandchildren, especially when there is high geographic separation between them. Participants referenced younger family members as having introduced them to, and having taught them how to use, technologies such as digital devices, computers, and social networking sites. The intergenerational support in the adoption of new technologies has important implications for helping older persons to remain independent and to age in place, in both age-friendly cities and in rural communities. The findings contribute to the growing literature in the fields of gerontology and gerontechnology on intergenerational influences and the impacts of technology use in later life and suggest the flexibility and willingness of older persons to adopt to new technologies as well as the value of intergenerational relationships for overcoming barriers to technology adoption.
published_date 2020-08-07T04:09:52Z
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