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“Only your first yes will count”: The impact of prelineup instructions on sequential lineup decisions. / Ruth Horry; Ryan J. Fitzgerald; Jamal K. Mansour

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied

Swansea University Author: Ruth, Horry

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DOI (Published version): 10.1037/xap0000337

Abstract

When administering sequential lineups, researchers often inform their participants that only their first yes response will count. This instruction differs from the original sequential lineup protocol and from how sequential lineups are conducted in practice. Participants (N = 896) viewed a videotape...

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Published in: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied
ISSN: 1076-898X 1939-2192
Published: American Psychological Association (APA) 2020
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa55176
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first_indexed 2020-09-15T10:35:36Z
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spelling 2020-11-19T15:22:35.3248165 v2 55176 2020-09-15 “Only your first yes will count”: The impact of prelineup instructions on sequential lineup decisions. ea243bc0327bc0213c076bda1fe85f10 0000-0003-3105-3781 Ruth Horry Ruth Horry true false 2020-09-15 HPS When administering sequential lineups, researchers often inform their participants that only their first yes response will count. This instruction differs from the original sequential lineup protocol and from how sequential lineups are conducted in practice. Participants (N = 896) viewed a videotaped mock crime and viewed a simultaneous lineup, a sequential lineup with a first-yes-counts instruction, or a sequential control lineup (with no first-yes-counts instruction); the lineup was either target-present or target-absent. Participants in the first-yes-counts condition were less likely to identify the suspect and more likely to reject the lineup than participants in the simultaneous and sequential control conditions, suggesting a conservative criterion shift. The diagnostic value of suspect identifications, as measured by partial Area Under the Curve, was lower in the first-yes-counts lineup than in the simultaneous lineup. Results were qualitatively similar for other metrics of diagnosticity, though the differences were not statistically significant. Differences between the simultaneous and sequential control lineups were negligible on all outcomes. The first-yes-counts instruction undermines sequential lineup performance and produces an artefactual simultaneous lineup advantage. Researchers should adhere to sequential lineup protocols that maximize diagnosticity and that would feasibly be implemented in practice, allowing them to draw more generalizable conclusions from their data. Journal Article Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied American Psychological Association (APA) 1076-898X 1939-2192 29 10 2020 2020-10-29 10.1037/xap0000337 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2020-11-19T15:22:35.3248165 2020-09-15T11:31:36.6420830 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Ruth Horry 0000-0003-3105-3781 1 Ryan J. Fitzgerald 2 Jamal K. Mansour 3 55176__18158__fcf7816ceb494c9d9d1f799466ab31d8.pdf Horry Fitzgerald Mansour 2019 pre-print.pdf 2020-09-15T11:34:13.9177339 Output 772595 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true true eng 28 true https://osf.io/cwfth/ false
title “Only your first yes will count”: The impact of prelineup instructions on sequential lineup decisions.
spellingShingle “Only your first yes will count”: The impact of prelineup instructions on sequential lineup decisions.
Ruth, Horry
title_short “Only your first yes will count”: The impact of prelineup instructions on sequential lineup decisions.
title_full “Only your first yes will count”: The impact of prelineup instructions on sequential lineup decisions.
title_fullStr “Only your first yes will count”: The impact of prelineup instructions on sequential lineup decisions.
title_full_unstemmed “Only your first yes will count”: The impact of prelineup instructions on sequential lineup decisions.
title_sort “Only your first yes will count”: The impact of prelineup instructions on sequential lineup decisions.
author_id_str_mv ea243bc0327bc0213c076bda1fe85f10
author_id_fullname_str_mv ea243bc0327bc0213c076bda1fe85f10_***_Ruth, Horry
author Ruth, Horry
author2 Ruth Horry
Ryan J. Fitzgerald
Jamal K. Mansour
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 1076-898X
1939-2192
doi_str_mv 10.1037/xap0000337
publisher American Psychological Association (APA)
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
document_store_str 1
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description When administering sequential lineups, researchers often inform their participants that only their first yes response will count. This instruction differs from the original sequential lineup protocol and from how sequential lineups are conducted in practice. Participants (N = 896) viewed a videotaped mock crime and viewed a simultaneous lineup, a sequential lineup with a first-yes-counts instruction, or a sequential control lineup (with no first-yes-counts instruction); the lineup was either target-present or target-absent. Participants in the first-yes-counts condition were less likely to identify the suspect and more likely to reject the lineup than participants in the simultaneous and sequential control conditions, suggesting a conservative criterion shift. The diagnostic value of suspect identifications, as measured by partial Area Under the Curve, was lower in the first-yes-counts lineup than in the simultaneous lineup. Results were qualitatively similar for other metrics of diagnosticity, though the differences were not statistically significant. Differences between the simultaneous and sequential control lineups were negligible on all outcomes. The first-yes-counts instruction undermines sequential lineup performance and produces an artefactual simultaneous lineup advantage. Researchers should adhere to sequential lineup protocols that maximize diagnosticity and that would feasibly be implemented in practice, allowing them to draw more generalizable conclusions from their data.
published_date 2020-10-29T04:21:08Z
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