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The Use of Single-Sided NMR to Study Moisture Behaviour in an Activated Carbon Fibre/Phenolic Composite / Sue Alston; Cris Arnold; Martin Swan; Corinne Stone

Applied Magnetic Resonance

Swansea University Authors: Sue, Alston, Cris, Arnold

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Abstract

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been shown to be a useful technique to study the form and content of water in polymer composites. Composites using activated carbon fibres with phenolic resin have complex water absorption behaviour which would benefit from such investigation; however, the presen...

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Published in: Applied Magnetic Resonance
ISSN: 0937-9347 1613-7507
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa55332
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Abstract: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been shown to be a useful technique to study the form and content of water in polymer composites. Composites using activated carbon fibres with phenolic resin have complex water absorption behaviour which would benefit from such investigation; however, the presence of the conductive fibres can make NMR problematic. In this study, single-sided NMR has been successfully used on such material by developing a method for sample-to-sample compensation for the effect of conductivity. Transverse relaxation curves showed water to be primarily in two states in the resin, corresponding to "bound" and "mobile" molecules. In addition, two much less bound states were identified in the composite, associated firstly with water adsorbed on to the fibre surface and secondly with clusters of water molecules moving more freely within the fibre pores.
College: College of Engineering