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Glucose management for exercise using continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and intermittently scanned CGM (isCGM) systems in type 1 diabetes: position statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and of th... / Othmar Moser; Michael C. Riddell; Max L. Eckstein; Peter Adolfsson; Rémi Rabasa‐Lhoret; Louisa Boom; Pieter Gillard; Kirsten Nørgaard; Nick S. Oliver; Dessi P. Zaharieva; Tadej Battelino; Carine Beaufort; Richard M. Bergenstal; Bruce Buckingham; Eda Cengiz; Asma Deeb; Tim Heise; Simon Heller; Aaron J. Kowalski; Lalantha Leelarathna; Chantal Mathieu; Christoph Stettler; Martin Tauschmann; Hood Thabit; Emma G. Wilmot; Harald Sourij; Carmel E. Smart; Peter G. Jacobs; Richard Bracken; Julia K. Mader

Pediatric Diabetes, Volume: 21, Issue: 8, Pages: 1375 - 1393

Swansea University Author: Richard, Bracken

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/pedi.13105

Abstract

Physical exercise is an important component in the management of type 1 diabetes across the lifespan. Yet, acute exercise increases the risk of dysglycaemia, and the direction of glycaemic excursions depends, to some extent, on the intensity and duration of the type of exercise. Understandably, fear...

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Published in: Pediatric Diabetes
ISSN: 1399-543X 1399-5448
Published: Wiley 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa55486
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Abstract: Physical exercise is an important component in the management of type 1 diabetes across the lifespan. Yet, acute exercise increases the risk of dysglycaemia, and the direction of glycaemic excursions depends, to some extent, on the intensity and duration of the type of exercise. Understandably, fear of hypoglycaemia is one of the strongest barriers to incorporating exercise into daily life. Risk of hypoglycaemia during and after exercise can be lowered when insulin‐dose adjustments are made and/or additional carbohydrates are consumed. Glycaemic management during exercise has been made easier with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and intermittently scanned continuous glucose monitoring (isCGM) systems; however, because of the complexity of CGM and isCGM systems, both individuals with type 1 diabetes and their healthcare professionals may struggle with the interpretation of given information to maximise the technological potential for effective use around exercise (ie, before, during and after). This position statement highlights the recent advancements in CGM and isCGM technology, with a focus on the evidence base for their efficacy to sense glucose around exercise and adaptations in the use of these emerging tools, and updates the guidance for exercise in adults, children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.
Item Description: This article is co‐published in the journals Diabetologia and Pediatric Diabetes, available at [https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-020-05263-9] and [https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/13995448], respectively.This is an abridged version of the Position Statement. The full‐length version is available on the EASD website (https://www.easd.org/sites/default/files/Exercise%20CGM%20EASD%20position%20statement_final.pdf)
Keywords: Adolescents; Adults; CGM; Children; Continuous glucose monitoring; Exercise; Physical activity; Position statement; Type 1 diabetes
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 8
Start Page: 1375
End Page: 1393