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The Effect of Carbon Ink Rheology on Ink Separation Mechanisms in Screen-Printing / Sarah-Jane Potts; Christopher Phillips; Timothy Claypole; Eifion Jewell

Coatings, Volume: 10, Issue: 10, Start page: 1008

Swansea University Authors: Sarah-Jane, Potts, Christopher, Phillips, Timothy, Claypole, Eifion, Jewell

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Abstract

Screen-printable carbon-based inks are available in a range of carbon morphologies and concentrations, resulting in various rheological profiles. There are challenges in obtaining a good print when high loading and elasticity functional inks are used, with a trade-off often required between function...

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Published in: Coatings
ISSN: 2079-6412
Published: MDPI AG 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa55510
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Abstract: Screen-printable carbon-based inks are available in a range of carbon morphologies and concentrations, resulting in various rheological profiles. There are challenges in obtaining a good print when high loading and elasticity functional inks are used, with a trade-off often required between functionality and printability. There is a limited understanding of how ink rheology influences the ink deposition mechanism during screen-printing, which then affects the print topography and therefore electrical performance. High speed imaging was used with a screen-printing simulation apparatus to investigate the effect of viscosity of a graphite and carbon-black ink at various levels of solvent dilution on the deposition mechanisms occurring during screen-printing. With little dilution, the greater relative volume of carbon in the ink resulted in a greater tendency towards elastic behavior than at higher dilutions. During the screen-printing process this led to the ink splitting into filaments while remaining in contact with both the mesh and substrate simultaneously over a greater horizonal length. The location of separating filaments corresponded with localized film thickness increases in the print, which led to a higher surface roughness (Sz). This method could be used to make appropriate adjustments to ink rheology to overcome print defects related to poor ink separation.
Keywords: carbon inks and pastes; screen printing; ink separation
College: College of Engineering
Issue: 10
Start Page: 1008