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Frontal Brain Activity and Subjective Arousal During Emotional Picture Viewing in Nightmare Sufferers

Michelle Carr Orcid Logo, Richard Summers, Ceri Bradshaw, Courtney Newton, Leslie Ellis, Erin Johnston, Mark Blagrove Orcid Logo

Frontiers in Neuroscience, Volume: 14, Start page: 585574

Swansea University Authors: Michelle Carr Orcid Logo, Ceri Bradshaw, Mark Blagrove Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Nightmares are intensely negative dreams that awaken the dreamer. Frequentnightmares are thought to reflect an executive deficit in regulating arousal. Withina diathesis-stress framework, this arousal is specific to negative contexts, thougha differential susceptibility framework predicts elevated a...

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Published in: Frontiers in Neuroscience
ISSN: 1662-453X
Published: Frontiers Media SA 2020
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Frequentnightmares are thought to reflect an executive deficit in regulating arousal. Withina diathesis-stress framework, this arousal is specific to negative contexts, thougha differential susceptibility framework predicts elevated arousal in response to bothnegative and positive contexts. The current study tested these predictions by assessingsubjective arousal and changes in frontal oxyhemoglobin (oxyHB) concentrations duringnegative and positive picture-viewing in nightmare sufferers (NM) and control subjects(CTL). 27 NM and 27 CTL subjects aged 18&#x2013;35 rated subjective arousal on a 1&#x2013;9scale following sequences of negative, neutral and positive images; changes in oxyHBwere measured by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) using a 2 4 template on thefrontal pole. Participants also completed the Highly Sensitive Person Scale, a traitmarker for differential susceptibility; and completed a dream diary reporting negativeand positive dream emotionality. The NM group had higher trait sensitivity, yet higherratings of negative but not positive emotion in diary dreams. NM compared to CTLsubjects reported higher subjective arousal in response to picture-viewing regardless ofvalence. Dysphoric dream distress, measured prospectively, was negatively associatedwith frontal activation when viewing negative pictures. Results suggest NM sufferersare highly sensitive to images regardless of valence according to subjective measures,and that there is a neural basis to level of trait and prospective nightmare distress. 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spelling 2021-07-02T13:13:34.5281504 v2 55625 2020-11-09 Frontal Brain Activity and Subjective Arousal During Emotional Picture Viewing in Nightmare Sufferers 892af5142bbe0a6c3dbb1f26f325ab02 0000-0003-0399-0196 Michelle Carr Michelle Carr true false 8b96f170df39ac5f5af2f9354946a630 Ceri Bradshaw Ceri Bradshaw true false 8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c 0000-0002-9854-1854 Mark Blagrove Mark Blagrove true false 2020-11-09 HPS Nightmares are intensely negative dreams that awaken the dreamer. Frequentnightmares are thought to reflect an executive deficit in regulating arousal. Withina diathesis-stress framework, this arousal is specific to negative contexts, thougha differential susceptibility framework predicts elevated arousal in response to bothnegative and positive contexts. The current study tested these predictions by assessingsubjective arousal and changes in frontal oxyhemoglobin (oxyHB) concentrations duringnegative and positive picture-viewing in nightmare sufferers (NM) and control subjects(CTL). 27 NM and 27 CTL subjects aged 18–35 rated subjective arousal on a 1–9scale following sequences of negative, neutral and positive images; changes in oxyHBwere measured by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) using a 2 4 template on thefrontal pole. Participants also completed the Highly Sensitive Person Scale, a traitmarker for differential susceptibility; and completed a dream diary reporting negativeand positive dream emotionality. The NM group had higher trait sensitivity, yet higherratings of negative but not positive emotion in diary dreams. NM compared to CTLsubjects reported higher subjective arousal in response to picture-viewing regardless ofvalence. Dysphoric dream distress, measured prospectively, was negatively associatedwith frontal activation when viewing negative pictures. Results suggest NM sufferersare highly sensitive to images regardless of valence according to subjective measures,and that there is a neural basis to level of trait and prospective nightmare distress. Futurelongitudinal or intervention studies should further explore positive emotion sensitivity andimagery in NM sufferers. Journal Article Frontiers in Neuroscience 14 585574 Frontiers Media SA 1662-453X nightmares, arousal, differential susceptibility, diathesis-stress, emotion regulation, frontal activation 30 9 2020 2020-09-30 10.3389/fnins.2020.585574 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University European Varela Award, Mind and Life Europe. 2021-07-02T13:13:34.5281504 2020-11-09T10:12:50.5773264 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences School of Psychology Michelle Carr 0000-0003-0399-0196 1 Richard Summers 2 Ceri Bradshaw 3 Courtney Newton 4 Leslie Ellis 5 Erin Johnston 6 Mark Blagrove 0000-0002-9854-1854 7 55625__18612__c594001e07b349438d252d7a22b82124.pdf Carr_Blagrove_NM_2020_fnins-14-585574.pdf 2020-11-09T10:25:01.6676396 Output 335040 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2020 Author(s). All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 (CC BY) License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Frontal Brain Activity and Subjective Arousal During Emotional Picture Viewing in Nightmare Sufferers
spellingShingle Frontal Brain Activity and Subjective Arousal During Emotional Picture Viewing in Nightmare Sufferers
Michelle Carr
Ceri Bradshaw
Mark Blagrove
title_short Frontal Brain Activity and Subjective Arousal During Emotional Picture Viewing in Nightmare Sufferers
title_full Frontal Brain Activity and Subjective Arousal During Emotional Picture Viewing in Nightmare Sufferers
title_fullStr Frontal Brain Activity and Subjective Arousal During Emotional Picture Viewing in Nightmare Sufferers
title_full_unstemmed Frontal Brain Activity and Subjective Arousal During Emotional Picture Viewing in Nightmare Sufferers
title_sort Frontal Brain Activity and Subjective Arousal During Emotional Picture Viewing in Nightmare Sufferers
author_id_str_mv 892af5142bbe0a6c3dbb1f26f325ab02
8b96f170df39ac5f5af2f9354946a630
8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c
author_id_fullname_str_mv 892af5142bbe0a6c3dbb1f26f325ab02_***_Michelle Carr
8b96f170df39ac5f5af2f9354946a630_***_Ceri Bradshaw
8c78ee008e650b9f0a463bae56a5636c_***_Mark Blagrove
author Michelle Carr
Ceri Bradshaw
Mark Blagrove
author2 Michelle Carr
Richard Summers
Ceri Bradshaw
Courtney Newton
Leslie Ellis
Erin Johnston
Mark Blagrove
format Journal article
container_title Frontiers in Neuroscience
container_volume 14
container_start_page 585574
publishDate 2020
institution Swansea University
issn 1662-453X
doi_str_mv 10.3389/fnins.2020.585574
publisher Frontiers Media SA
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str School of Psychology{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Psychology
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description Nightmares are intensely negative dreams that awaken the dreamer. Frequentnightmares are thought to reflect an executive deficit in regulating arousal. Withina diathesis-stress framework, this arousal is specific to negative contexts, thougha differential susceptibility framework predicts elevated arousal in response to bothnegative and positive contexts. The current study tested these predictions by assessingsubjective arousal and changes in frontal oxyhemoglobin (oxyHB) concentrations duringnegative and positive picture-viewing in nightmare sufferers (NM) and control subjects(CTL). 27 NM and 27 CTL subjects aged 18–35 rated subjective arousal on a 1–9scale following sequences of negative, neutral and positive images; changes in oxyHBwere measured by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) using a 2 4 template on thefrontal pole. Participants also completed the Highly Sensitive Person Scale, a traitmarker for differential susceptibility; and completed a dream diary reporting negativeand positive dream emotionality. The NM group had higher trait sensitivity, yet higherratings of negative but not positive emotion in diary dreams. NM compared to CTLsubjects reported higher subjective arousal in response to picture-viewing regardless ofvalence. Dysphoric dream distress, measured prospectively, was negatively associatedwith frontal activation when viewing negative pictures. Results suggest NM sufferersare highly sensitive to images regardless of valence according to subjective measures,and that there is a neural basis to level of trait and prospective nightmare distress. Futurelongitudinal or intervention studies should further explore positive emotion sensitivity andimagery in NM sufferers.
published_date 2020-09-30T04:09:59Z
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