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Measuring the effect of think aloud protocols on workload using fNIRS / Matthew F. Pike; Horia A. Maior; Martin Porcheron; Sarah C. Sharples; Max L. Wilson

Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, Pages: 3807 - 3816

Swansea University Author: Martin, Porcheron

DOI (Published version): 10.1145/2556288.2556974

Abstract

The Think Aloud Protocol (TAP) is a verbalisation technique widely employed in HCI user studies to give insight into user experience, yet little work has explored the impact that TAPs have on participants during user studies. This paper utilises a brain sensing technique, fNIRS, to observe the effec...

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Published in: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
ISBN: 9781450324731
Published: New York, NY, USA ACM 2014
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa55706
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spelling 2021-01-11T14:58:14.8974929 v2 55706 2020-11-20 Measuring the effect of think aloud protocols on workload using fNIRS d9de398c04c0b443d547d455782d5de5 0000-0003-3814-7174 Martin Porcheron Martin Porcheron true false 2020-11-20 SCS The Think Aloud Protocol (TAP) is a verbalisation technique widely employed in HCI user studies to give insight into user experience, yet little work has explored the impact that TAPs have on participants during user studies. This paper utilises a brain sensing technique, fNIRS, to observe the effect that TAPs have on participants. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a brain sensing technology that offers the potential to provide continuous, detailed insight into brain activity, enabling an objective view of cognitive processes during complex tasks. Participants were asked to perform a mathematical task under 4 conditions: nonsense verbalisations, passive concurrent think aloud protocol, invasive concurrent think aloud protocol, and a baseline of silence. Subjective ratings and performance measures were collected during the study. Our results provide a novel view into the effect that different forms of verbalisation have on workload during tasks. Further, the results provide a means for estimating the effect of spoken artefacts when measuring workload, which is another step towards our goal of proactively involving fNIRS analysis in ecologically valid user studies. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 3807 3816 ACM New York, NY, USA 9781450324731 bci; think aloud protocol; hci; human cognition; functional near-infrared spectroscopy; fnirs 26 4 2014 2014-04-26 10.1145/2556288.2556974 COLLEGE NANME Computer Science COLLEGE CODE SCS Swansea University 2021-01-11T14:58:14.8974929 2020-11-20T14:30:08.0161395 College of Science Computer Science Matthew F. Pike 1 Horia A. Maior 2 Martin Porcheron 0000-0003-3814-7174 3 Sarah C. Sharples 4 Max L. Wilson 5 55706__18707__27f5a6d59f9b40f5b13fb415b698232c.pdf CHI2014-fnirs-preprint.pdf 2020-11-20T14:33:29.7823887 Output 619661 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true false eng
title Measuring the effect of think aloud protocols on workload using fNIRS
spellingShingle Measuring the effect of think aloud protocols on workload using fNIRS
Martin, Porcheron
title_short Measuring the effect of think aloud protocols on workload using fNIRS
title_full Measuring the effect of think aloud protocols on workload using fNIRS
title_fullStr Measuring the effect of think aloud protocols on workload using fNIRS
title_full_unstemmed Measuring the effect of think aloud protocols on workload using fNIRS
title_sort Measuring the effect of think aloud protocols on workload using fNIRS
author_id_str_mv d9de398c04c0b443d547d455782d5de5
author_id_fullname_str_mv d9de398c04c0b443d547d455782d5de5_***_Martin, Porcheron
author Martin, Porcheron
author2 Matthew F. Pike
Horia A. Maior
Martin Porcheron
Sarah C. Sharples
Max L. Wilson
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description The Think Aloud Protocol (TAP) is a verbalisation technique widely employed in HCI user studies to give insight into user experience, yet little work has explored the impact that TAPs have on participants during user studies. This paper utilises a brain sensing technique, fNIRS, to observe the effect that TAPs have on participants. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a brain sensing technology that offers the potential to provide continuous, detailed insight into brain activity, enabling an objective view of cognitive processes during complex tasks. Participants were asked to perform a mathematical task under 4 conditions: nonsense verbalisations, passive concurrent think aloud protocol, invasive concurrent think aloud protocol, and a baseline of silence. Subjective ratings and performance measures were collected during the study. Our results provide a novel view into the effect that different forms of verbalisation have on workload during tasks. Further, the results provide a means for estimating the effect of spoken artefacts when measuring workload, which is another step towards our goal of proactively involving fNIRS analysis in ecologically valid user studies.
published_date 2014-04-26T04:22:03Z
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