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Physical activity, mental health and well-being of adults during initial COVID-19 containment strategies: A multi-country cross-sectional analysis / James Faulkner, Wendy J. O’Brien, Bronagh McGrane, Daniel Wadsworth, John Batten, Christopher D. Askew, Claire Badenhorst, Erin Byrd, Maura Coulter, Nick Draper, Catherine Elliot, Simon Fryer, Michael J. Hamlin, John Jakeman, Kelly Mackintosh, Melitta McNarry, Andrew Mitchelmore, John Murphy, Helen Ryan-Stewart, Zoe Saynor, Mia Schaumberg, Keeron Stone, Lee Stoner, Beth Stuart, Danielle Lambrick

Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Volume: 24, Issue: 4, Pages: 320 - 326

Swansea University Authors: Kelly Mackintosh, Melitta McNarry

  • Accepted Manuscript under embargo until: 3rd December 2021

Abstract

ObjectivesTo assess physical activity (PA), mental health and well-being of adults in the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, New Zealand and Australia during the initial stages of National governments’ Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) containment responses.DesignObservational, cross-sectional.MethodsAn onl...

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Published in: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
ISSN: 1440-2440
Published: Elsevier BV 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa55752
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2021-05-01T12:04:47.1101372</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>55752</id><entry>2020-11-25</entry><title>Physical activity, mental health and well-being of adults during initial COVID-19 containment strategies: A multi-country cross-sectional analysis</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0355-6357</ORCID><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><name>Kelly Mackintosh</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0813-7477</ORCID><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><name>Melitta McNarry</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2020-11-25</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>ObjectivesTo assess physical activity (PA), mental health and well-being of adults in the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, New Zealand and Australia during the initial stages of National governments&#x2019; Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) containment responses.DesignObservational, cross-sectional.MethodsAn online survey was disseminated to adults (n = 8,425; 44.5 &#xB1; 14.8y) residing in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia within the first 2-6 weeks of government-mandated COVID-19 restrictions. Main outcome measures included: Stages of Change scale for exercise behaviour change; International Physical Activity Questionnaire (short-form); World Health Organisation-5 Well-being Index; and the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-9.ResultsParticipants who reported a negative change in exercise behaviour from before initial COVID-19 restrictions to during the initial COVID-19 restrictions demonstrated poorer mental health and well-being compared to those demonstrating either a positive-or no change in their exercise behaviour (p &lt; 0.001). Whilst women reported more positive changes in exercise behaviour, young people (18-29y) reported more negative changes (both p &lt; 0.001). Individuals who had more positive exercise behaviours reported better mental health and well-being (p &lt; 0.001). Although there were no differences in PA between countries, individuals in New Zealand reported better mental health and well-being (p &lt; 0.001).ConclusionThe initial COVID-19 restrictions have differentially impacted upon PA habits of individuals based upon their age and sex, and therefore have important implications for international policy and guideline recommendations. Public health interventions that encourage PA should target specific groups (e.g., men, young adults) who are most vulnerable to the negative effects of physical distancing and/or self-isolation.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport</journal><volume>24</volume><journalNumber>4</journalNumber><paginationStart>320</paginationStart><paginationEnd>326</paginationEnd><publisher>Elsevier BV</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>1440-2440</issnPrint><issnElectronic/><keywords>Coronavirus disease; pandemic; lifestyle behavior change; exercise; depression; sedentary time</keywords><publishedDay>1</publishedDay><publishedMonth>4</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2021</publishedYear><publishedDate>2021-04-01</publishedDate><doi>10.1016/j.jsams.2020.11.016</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2021-05-01T12:04:47.1101372</lastEdited><Created>2020-11-25T10:05:28.4115256</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Sports Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>James</firstname><surname>Faulkner</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Wendy J.</firstname><surname>O&#x2019;Brien</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Bronagh</firstname><surname>McGrane</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Daniel</firstname><surname>Wadsworth</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>John</firstname><surname>Batten</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Christopher D.</firstname><surname>Askew</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Claire</firstname><surname>Badenhorst</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Erin</firstname><surname>Byrd</surname><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Maura</firstname><surname>Coulter</surname><order>9</order></author><author><firstname>Nick</firstname><surname>Draper</surname><order>10</order></author><author><firstname>Catherine</firstname><surname>Elliot</surname><order>11</order></author><author><firstname>Simon</firstname><surname>Fryer</surname><order>12</order></author><author><firstname>Michael J.</firstname><surname>Hamlin</surname><order>13</order></author><author><firstname>John</firstname><surname>Jakeman</surname><order>14</order></author><author><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0355-6357</orcid><order>15</order></author><author><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0813-7477</orcid><order>16</order></author><author><firstname>Andrew</firstname><surname>Mitchelmore</surname><order>17</order></author><author><firstname>John</firstname><surname>Murphy</surname><order>18</order></author><author><firstname>Helen</firstname><surname>Ryan-Stewart</surname><order>19</order></author><author><firstname>Zoe</firstname><surname>Saynor</surname><order>20</order></author><author><firstname>Mia</firstname><surname>Schaumberg</surname><order>21</order></author><author><firstname>Keeron</firstname><surname>Stone</surname><order>22</order></author><author><firstname>Lee</firstname><surname>Stoner</surname><order>23</order></author><author><firstname>Beth</firstname><surname>Stuart</surname><order>24</order></author><author><firstname>Danielle</firstname><surname>Lambrick</surname><order>25</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>Under embargo</filename><originalFilename>Under embargo</originalFilename><uploaded>2020-11-25T10:07:06.0489707</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>1066768</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><embargoDate>2021-12-03T00:00:00.0000000</embargoDate><documentNotes>&#xA9;2020 All rights reserved. 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spelling 2021-05-01T12:04:47.1101372 v2 55752 2020-11-25 Physical activity, mental health and well-being of adults during initial COVID-19 containment strategies: A multi-country cross-sectional analysis bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false 2020-11-25 STSC ObjectivesTo assess physical activity (PA), mental health and well-being of adults in the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, New Zealand and Australia during the initial stages of National governments’ Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) containment responses.DesignObservational, cross-sectional.MethodsAn online survey was disseminated to adults (n = 8,425; 44.5 ± 14.8y) residing in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia within the first 2-6 weeks of government-mandated COVID-19 restrictions. Main outcome measures included: Stages of Change scale for exercise behaviour change; International Physical Activity Questionnaire (short-form); World Health Organisation-5 Well-being Index; and the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-9.ResultsParticipants who reported a negative change in exercise behaviour from before initial COVID-19 restrictions to during the initial COVID-19 restrictions demonstrated poorer mental health and well-being compared to those demonstrating either a positive-or no change in their exercise behaviour (p < 0.001). Whilst women reported more positive changes in exercise behaviour, young people (18-29y) reported more negative changes (both p < 0.001). Individuals who had more positive exercise behaviours reported better mental health and well-being (p < 0.001). Although there were no differences in PA between countries, individuals in New Zealand reported better mental health and well-being (p < 0.001).ConclusionThe initial COVID-19 restrictions have differentially impacted upon PA habits of individuals based upon their age and sex, and therefore have important implications for international policy and guideline recommendations. Public health interventions that encourage PA should target specific groups (e.g., men, young adults) who are most vulnerable to the negative effects of physical distancing and/or self-isolation. Journal Article Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport 24 4 320 326 Elsevier BV 1440-2440 Coronavirus disease; pandemic; lifestyle behavior change; exercise; depression; sedentary time 1 4 2021 2021-04-01 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.11.016 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2021-05-01T12:04:47.1101372 2020-11-25T10:05:28.4115256 College of Engineering Sports Science James Faulkner 1 Wendy J. O’Brien 2 Bronagh McGrane 3 Daniel Wadsworth 4 John Batten 5 Christopher D. Askew 6 Claire Badenhorst 7 Erin Byrd 8 Maura Coulter 9 Nick Draper 10 Catherine Elliot 11 Simon Fryer 12 Michael J. Hamlin 13 John Jakeman 14 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 15 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 16 Andrew Mitchelmore 17 John Murphy 18 Helen Ryan-Stewart 19 Zoe Saynor 20 Mia Schaumberg 21 Keeron Stone 22 Lee Stoner 23 Beth Stuart 24 Danielle Lambrick 25 Under embargo Under embargo 2020-11-25T10:07:06.0489707 Output 1066768 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true 2021-12-03T00:00:00.0000000 ©2020 All rights reserved. All article content, except where otherwise noted, is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License (CC-BY-NC-ND) true eng
title Physical activity, mental health and well-being of adults during initial COVID-19 containment strategies: A multi-country cross-sectional analysis
spellingShingle Physical activity, mental health and well-being of adults during initial COVID-19 containment strategies: A multi-country cross-sectional analysis
Kelly, Mackintosh
Melitta, McNarry
title_short Physical activity, mental health and well-being of adults during initial COVID-19 containment strategies: A multi-country cross-sectional analysis
title_full Physical activity, mental health and well-being of adults during initial COVID-19 containment strategies: A multi-country cross-sectional analysis
title_fullStr Physical activity, mental health and well-being of adults during initial COVID-19 containment strategies: A multi-country cross-sectional analysis
title_full_unstemmed Physical activity, mental health and well-being of adults during initial COVID-19 containment strategies: A multi-country cross-sectional analysis
title_sort Physical activity, mental health and well-being of adults during initial COVID-19 containment strategies: A multi-country cross-sectional analysis
author_id_str_mv bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
author_id_fullname_str_mv bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
author Kelly, Mackintosh
Melitta, McNarry
author2 James Faulkner
Wendy J. O’Brien
Bronagh McGrane
Daniel Wadsworth
John Batten
Christopher D. Askew
Claire Badenhorst
Erin Byrd
Maura Coulter
Nick Draper
Catherine Elliot
Simon Fryer
Michael J. Hamlin
John Jakeman
Kelly Mackintosh
Melitta McNarry
Andrew Mitchelmore
John Murphy
Helen Ryan-Stewart
Zoe Saynor
Mia Schaumberg
Keeron Stone
Lee Stoner
Beth Stuart
Danielle Lambrick
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
container_volume 24
container_issue 4
container_start_page 320
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 1440-2440
doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.jsams.2020.11.016
publisher Elsevier BV
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description ObjectivesTo assess physical activity (PA), mental health and well-being of adults in the United Kingdom (UK), Ireland, New Zealand and Australia during the initial stages of National governments’ Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) containment responses.DesignObservational, cross-sectional.MethodsAn online survey was disseminated to adults (n = 8,425; 44.5 ± 14.8y) residing in the UK, Ireland, New Zealand and Australia within the first 2-6 weeks of government-mandated COVID-19 restrictions. Main outcome measures included: Stages of Change scale for exercise behaviour change; International Physical Activity Questionnaire (short-form); World Health Organisation-5 Well-being Index; and the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale-9.ResultsParticipants who reported a negative change in exercise behaviour from before initial COVID-19 restrictions to during the initial COVID-19 restrictions demonstrated poorer mental health and well-being compared to those demonstrating either a positive-or no change in their exercise behaviour (p < 0.001). Whilst women reported more positive changes in exercise behaviour, young people (18-29y) reported more negative changes (both p < 0.001). Individuals who had more positive exercise behaviours reported better mental health and well-being (p < 0.001). Although there were no differences in PA between countries, individuals in New Zealand reported better mental health and well-being (p < 0.001).ConclusionThe initial COVID-19 restrictions have differentially impacted upon PA habits of individuals based upon their age and sex, and therefore have important implications for international policy and guideline recommendations. Public health interventions that encourage PA should target specific groups (e.g., men, young adults) who are most vulnerable to the negative effects of physical distancing and/or self-isolation.
published_date 2021-04-01T04:17:58Z
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