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Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 202 views 98 downloads

The International Impact of COVID-19 and "Emergency Remote Teaching" on Computer Science Education Practitioners / Tom Crick, Cathryn Knight, Richard Watermeyer, Janet Goodall

IEEE Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON'21)

Swansea University Authors: Tom Crick, Cathryn Knight, Janet Goodall

DOI (Published version): 10.1109/EDUCON46332.2021.9453846

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed "emergency remote teaching" across education globally, leading to the closure of institutions across all settings, from schools through to universities. This paper looks specifically at the impact of these disruptive changes to those teaching the disciplin...

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Published in: IEEE Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON'21)
Published: IEEE 2021
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56273
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spelling 2021-08-12T16:26:03.8357148 v2 56273 2021-02-17 The International Impact of COVID-19 and "Emergency Remote Teaching" on Computer Science Education Practitioners 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 0000-0001-5196-9389 Tom Crick Tom Crick true false e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb 0000-0002-7574-3090 Cathryn Knight Cathryn Knight true false ff88a186bd447a1af286d2468fc61688 0000-0002-0172-2035 Janet Goodall Janet Goodall true false 2021-02-17 EDUC The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed "emergency remote teaching" across education globally, leading to the closure of institutions across all settings, from schools through to universities. This paper looks specifically at the impact of these disruptive changes to those teaching the discipline of computer science. Drawing on the quantitative and qualitative findings from a large-scale international survey (N=2,483) conducted in the immediate aftermath of closures, implementation of lockdown measures, and the shift to online delivery in March 2020, we report how those teaching computer science across all educational levels (n=327) show significantly more positive attitudes towards the move to online learning, teaching and assessment (LT&A) than those working in other disciplines. When comparing educational setting, computer science practitioners in schools felt more prepared and confident than those in higher education; however, they expressed greater concern around equity and whether students would be able to access the teaching made available online. Furthermore, while practitioners across all sectors consistently noted the potential opportunities of these changes, they also raised a number of wider concerns on the impact of this shift to online, especially on workload and job precarity. More specifically for computer science practitioners, there were concerns raised regarding the ability to effectively deliver technical topics online, as well as the impact on various types of formal examinations and assessment. We also offer informed commentary from this rapid response international survey on emerging LT&A strategies that will likely continue to be constrained by coronavirus into 2021 and possibly beyond. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract IEEE Global Engineering Education Conference (EDUCON'21) 0 IEEE COVID-19, emergency remote teaching, practitioner perceptions, schools, universities, computer science education 18 6 2021 2021-06-18 10.1109/EDUCON46332.2021.9453846 COLLEGE NANME Education COLLEGE CODE EDUC Swansea University 2021-08-12T16:26:03.8357148 2021-02-17T09:45:00.4756018 College of Arts and Humanities School of Education Tom Crick 0000-0001-5196-9389 1 Cathryn Knight 0000-0002-7574-3090 2 Richard Watermeyer 3 Janet Goodall 0000-0002-0172-2035 4 56273__19451__bd94d4643dcf4fe4987cbf3c6b1d5c2f.pdf EDUCON2021_paper1354_cameraready.pdf 2021-03-09T09:50:52.3228719 Output 165205 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true true eng
title The International Impact of COVID-19 and "Emergency Remote Teaching" on Computer Science Education Practitioners
spellingShingle The International Impact of COVID-19 and "Emergency Remote Teaching" on Computer Science Education Practitioners
Tom, Crick
Cathryn, Knight
Janet, Goodall
title_short The International Impact of COVID-19 and "Emergency Remote Teaching" on Computer Science Education Practitioners
title_full The International Impact of COVID-19 and "Emergency Remote Teaching" on Computer Science Education Practitioners
title_fullStr The International Impact of COVID-19 and "Emergency Remote Teaching" on Computer Science Education Practitioners
title_full_unstemmed The International Impact of COVID-19 and "Emergency Remote Teaching" on Computer Science Education Practitioners
title_sort The International Impact of COVID-19 and "Emergency Remote Teaching" on Computer Science Education Practitioners
author_id_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
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author_id_fullname_str_mv 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Tom, Crick
e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb_***_Cathryn, Knight
ff88a186bd447a1af286d2468fc61688_***_Janet, Goodall
author Tom, Crick
Cathryn, Knight
Janet, Goodall
author2 Tom Crick
Cathryn Knight
Richard Watermeyer
Janet Goodall
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description The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed "emergency remote teaching" across education globally, leading to the closure of institutions across all settings, from schools through to universities. This paper looks specifically at the impact of these disruptive changes to those teaching the discipline of computer science. Drawing on the quantitative and qualitative findings from a large-scale international survey (N=2,483) conducted in the immediate aftermath of closures, implementation of lockdown measures, and the shift to online delivery in March 2020, we report how those teaching computer science across all educational levels (n=327) show significantly more positive attitudes towards the move to online learning, teaching and assessment (LT&A) than those working in other disciplines. When comparing educational setting, computer science practitioners in schools felt more prepared and confident than those in higher education; however, they expressed greater concern around equity and whether students would be able to access the teaching made available online. Furthermore, while practitioners across all sectors consistently noted the potential opportunities of these changes, they also raised a number of wider concerns on the impact of this shift to online, especially on workload and job precarity. More specifically for computer science practitioners, there were concerns raised regarding the ability to effectively deliver technical topics online, as well as the impact on various types of formal examinations and assessment. We also offer informed commentary from this rapid response international survey on emerging LT&A strategies that will likely continue to be constrained by coronavirus into 2021 and possibly beyond.
published_date 2021-06-18T04:15:03Z
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