No Cover Image

Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 193 views 29 downloads

Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Early Education and Care in the UK: Perspectives of Teachers and Practitioners / Jacky Tyrie, Tom Crick, Helen Lewis, Cathryn Knight

34th International Congress for School Effectiveness and Improvement (ICSEI 2021)

Swansea University Authors: Jacky Tyrie, Tom Crick, Helen Lewis, Cathryn Knight

Abstract

COVID-19 has impacted all aspects of society, and especially education. However, families and children are often hardest hit "Lockdown has been a seismic shock for every family" (Saunders and Hogg, 2020), particularly for vulnerable families (Conti, 2020). Related research suggests that ch...

Full description

Published in: 34th International Congress for School Effectiveness and Improvement (ICSEI 2021)
Published: 2021
Online Access: https://2021.icsei.net/programme/preliminary-programme/
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56384
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2021-03-09T09:44:55Z
last_indexed 2021-10-30T03:20:11Z
id cronfa56384
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2021-10-29T16:50:41.0775900</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>56384</id><entry>2021-03-09</entry><title>Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Early Education and Care in the UK: Perspectives of Teachers and Practitioners</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>c1a41159a94ed9bf45e035f6a2a2ca79</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-6419-5391</ORCID><firstname>Jacky</firstname><surname>Tyrie</surname><name>Jacky Tyrie</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-5196-9389</ORCID><firstname>Tom</firstname><surname>Crick</surname><name>Tom Crick</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>daebf144a10dc3164bff6ec1800d66d3</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-4329-913X</ORCID><firstname>Helen</firstname><surname>Lewis</surname><name>Helen Lewis</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-7574-3090</ORCID><firstname>Cathryn</firstname><surname>Knight</surname><name>Cathryn Knight</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2021-03-09</date><deptcode>EDUC</deptcode><abstract>COVID-19 has impacted all aspects of society, and especially education. However, families and children are often hardest hit "Lockdown has been a seismic shock for every family" (Saunders and Hogg, 2020), particularly for vulnerable families (Conti, 2020). Related research suggests that childcare providers will have been financially impacted during the lockdown period (Blanden et al., 2020). There is thus much to be concerned in terms of the access and quality of young children&#x2019;s education and care; however, little evidence is available to ascertain the impact of COVID-19 on early years settings, practitioners and children. Much of the media focus has been on school-age learners or higher education (Watermeyer et al., 2020); measuring this impact on Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) is vital to better understand this essential societal provision for supporting the education of our youngest learners. This paper reports on a project which explored the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on UK ECEC provision.Policy and guidance documents abound across the four UK nations, providing ECEC settings with detailed information about current regulations. The voluntary sector has also been key to providing operational advice (NDNA, 2020). However, little empirical research exists to date that captures and analyses the experiences of ECEC settings in their efforts to translate this emerging policy into practice, as well as the impact this is having on practitioners&#x2019; workplace, themselves and the children in their care.This research aims to explore the perspectives of the UK&#x2019;s ECEC workforce using a realistic epistemological position to gather quantitative and qualitative data from an anonymous online survey. The online survey has been completed by over 400 practitioners, childcare workers, setting managers, and teachers working with children aged 0-8 years old across the UK. The survey explored the impact of any changes that had been made within settings as a result of the pandemic, especially new ways of working. The survey also examined practitioner perceptions of these changes; focusing on the impact of coronavirus on early years pedagogy, practitioners and children. Initial analysis suggestions some of the following findings; the impact of COVID-19 has negatively impacted on the health and wellbeing of ECEC staff and children, with management facing challenges in adhering to the evolving regulations. Parents have expressed their concerns about the changes in available childcare hours, and to not being able to enter premises and meaningfully engage with staff and children. A number of respondents were concerned about the financial sustainability of the sector, potentially requiring government support to ensure that services remain available and accessible to all.The findings from this research provide vital insight into UK ECEC settings, acknowledging the crisis response to the pandemic and the short, medium and longer-term impact of COVID-19 on learners and practitioners, as well as the potential for reimagining learning if/when we revert to a post-COVID normal. We aim to inform emerging policy and practice across the four nations of the UK, to better support settings in dealing with current and future scenarios of this kind.</abstract><type>Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract</type><journal>34th International Congress for School Effectiveness and Improvement (ICSEI 2021)</journal><volume/><journalNumber/><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher/><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint/><issnElectronic/><keywords/><publishedDay>8</publishedDay><publishedMonth>3</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2021</publishedYear><publishedDate>2021-03-08</publishedDate><doi/><url>https://2021.icsei.net/programme/preliminary-programme/</url><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Education</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>EDUC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2021-10-29T16:50:41.0775900</lastEdited><Created>2021-03-09T09:38:53.3476050</Created><path><level id="1">College of Arts and Humanities</level><level id="2">School of Education</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Jacky</firstname><surname>Tyrie</surname><orcid>0000-0002-6419-5391</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Tom</firstname><surname>Crick</surname><orcid>0000-0001-5196-9389</orcid><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Helen</firstname><surname>Lewis</surname><orcid>0000-0003-4329-913X</orcid><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Cathryn</firstname><surname>Knight</surname><orcid>0000-0002-7574-3090</orcid><order>4</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>56384__19449__6504b26793b44d97a3c5f4e30688b67b.pdf</filename><originalFilename>ICSEI2021 abstract.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2021-03-09T09:44:19.1668154</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>146099</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Accepted Manuscript</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2021-10-29T16:50:41.0775900 v2 56384 2021-03-09 Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Early Education and Care in the UK: Perspectives of Teachers and Practitioners c1a41159a94ed9bf45e035f6a2a2ca79 0000-0002-6419-5391 Jacky Tyrie Jacky Tyrie true false 200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99 0000-0001-5196-9389 Tom Crick Tom Crick true false daebf144a10dc3164bff6ec1800d66d3 0000-0003-4329-913X Helen Lewis Helen Lewis true false e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb 0000-0002-7574-3090 Cathryn Knight Cathryn Knight true false 2021-03-09 EDUC COVID-19 has impacted all aspects of society, and especially education. However, families and children are often hardest hit "Lockdown has been a seismic shock for every family" (Saunders and Hogg, 2020), particularly for vulnerable families (Conti, 2020). Related research suggests that childcare providers will have been financially impacted during the lockdown period (Blanden et al., 2020). There is thus much to be concerned in terms of the access and quality of young children’s education and care; however, little evidence is available to ascertain the impact of COVID-19 on early years settings, practitioners and children. Much of the media focus has been on school-age learners or higher education (Watermeyer et al., 2020); measuring this impact on Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) is vital to better understand this essential societal provision for supporting the education of our youngest learners. This paper reports on a project which explored the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on UK ECEC provision.Policy and guidance documents abound across the four UK nations, providing ECEC settings with detailed information about current regulations. The voluntary sector has also been key to providing operational advice (NDNA, 2020). However, little empirical research exists to date that captures and analyses the experiences of ECEC settings in their efforts to translate this emerging policy into practice, as well as the impact this is having on practitioners’ workplace, themselves and the children in their care.This research aims to explore the perspectives of the UK’s ECEC workforce using a realistic epistemological position to gather quantitative and qualitative data from an anonymous online survey. The online survey has been completed by over 400 practitioners, childcare workers, setting managers, and teachers working with children aged 0-8 years old across the UK. The survey explored the impact of any changes that had been made within settings as a result of the pandemic, especially new ways of working. The survey also examined practitioner perceptions of these changes; focusing on the impact of coronavirus on early years pedagogy, practitioners and children. Initial analysis suggestions some of the following findings; the impact of COVID-19 has negatively impacted on the health and wellbeing of ECEC staff and children, with management facing challenges in adhering to the evolving regulations. Parents have expressed their concerns about the changes in available childcare hours, and to not being able to enter premises and meaningfully engage with staff and children. A number of respondents were concerned about the financial sustainability of the sector, potentially requiring government support to ensure that services remain available and accessible to all.The findings from this research provide vital insight into UK ECEC settings, acknowledging the crisis response to the pandemic and the short, medium and longer-term impact of COVID-19 on learners and practitioners, as well as the potential for reimagining learning if/when we revert to a post-COVID normal. We aim to inform emerging policy and practice across the four nations of the UK, to better support settings in dealing with current and future scenarios of this kind. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract 34th International Congress for School Effectiveness and Improvement (ICSEI 2021) 8 3 2021 2021-03-08 https://2021.icsei.net/programme/preliminary-programme/ COLLEGE NANME Education COLLEGE CODE EDUC Swansea University 2021-10-29T16:50:41.0775900 2021-03-09T09:38:53.3476050 College of Arts and Humanities School of Education Jacky Tyrie 0000-0002-6419-5391 1 Tom Crick 0000-0001-5196-9389 2 Helen Lewis 0000-0003-4329-913X 3 Cathryn Knight 0000-0002-7574-3090 4 56384__19449__6504b26793b44d97a3c5f4e30688b67b.pdf ICSEI2021 abstract.pdf 2021-03-09T09:44:19.1668154 Output 146099 application/pdf Accepted Manuscript true true eng
title Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Early Education and Care in the UK: Perspectives of Teachers and Practitioners
spellingShingle Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Early Education and Care in the UK: Perspectives of Teachers and Practitioners
Jacky, Tyrie
Tom, Crick
Helen, Lewis
Cathryn, Knight
title_short Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Early Education and Care in the UK: Perspectives of Teachers and Practitioners
title_full Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Early Education and Care in the UK: Perspectives of Teachers and Practitioners
title_fullStr Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Early Education and Care in the UK: Perspectives of Teachers and Practitioners
title_full_unstemmed Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Early Education and Care in the UK: Perspectives of Teachers and Practitioners
title_sort Measuring the Impact of COVID-19 on Early Education and Care in the UK: Perspectives of Teachers and Practitioners
author_id_str_mv c1a41159a94ed9bf45e035f6a2a2ca79
200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99
daebf144a10dc3164bff6ec1800d66d3
e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb
author_id_fullname_str_mv c1a41159a94ed9bf45e035f6a2a2ca79_***_Jacky, Tyrie
200c66ef0fc55391f736f6e926fb4b99_***_Tom, Crick
daebf144a10dc3164bff6ec1800d66d3_***_Helen, Lewis
e43d033fc7f2ccc9317c49df10b9b7bb_***_Cathryn, Knight
author Jacky, Tyrie
Tom, Crick
Helen, Lewis
Cathryn, Knight
author2 Jacky Tyrie
Tom Crick
Helen Lewis
Cathryn Knight
format Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract
container_title 34th International Congress for School Effectiveness and Improvement (ICSEI 2021)
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
college_str College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_top_title College of Arts and Humanities
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofartsandhumanities
hierarchy_parent_title College of Arts and Humanities
department_str School of Education{{{_:::_}}}College of Arts and Humanities{{{_:::_}}}School of Education
url https://2021.icsei.net/programme/preliminary-programme/
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description COVID-19 has impacted all aspects of society, and especially education. However, families and children are often hardest hit "Lockdown has been a seismic shock for every family" (Saunders and Hogg, 2020), particularly for vulnerable families (Conti, 2020). Related research suggests that childcare providers will have been financially impacted during the lockdown period (Blanden et al., 2020). There is thus much to be concerned in terms of the access and quality of young children’s education and care; however, little evidence is available to ascertain the impact of COVID-19 on early years settings, practitioners and children. Much of the media focus has been on school-age learners or higher education (Watermeyer et al., 2020); measuring this impact on Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) is vital to better understand this essential societal provision for supporting the education of our youngest learners. This paper reports on a project which explored the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on UK ECEC provision.Policy and guidance documents abound across the four UK nations, providing ECEC settings with detailed information about current regulations. The voluntary sector has also been key to providing operational advice (NDNA, 2020). However, little empirical research exists to date that captures and analyses the experiences of ECEC settings in their efforts to translate this emerging policy into practice, as well as the impact this is having on practitioners’ workplace, themselves and the children in their care.This research aims to explore the perspectives of the UK’s ECEC workforce using a realistic epistemological position to gather quantitative and qualitative data from an anonymous online survey. The online survey has been completed by over 400 practitioners, childcare workers, setting managers, and teachers working with children aged 0-8 years old across the UK. The survey explored the impact of any changes that had been made within settings as a result of the pandemic, especially new ways of working. The survey also examined practitioner perceptions of these changes; focusing on the impact of coronavirus on early years pedagogy, practitioners and children. Initial analysis suggestions some of the following findings; the impact of COVID-19 has negatively impacted on the health and wellbeing of ECEC staff and children, with management facing challenges in adhering to the evolving regulations. Parents have expressed their concerns about the changes in available childcare hours, and to not being able to enter premises and meaningfully engage with staff and children. A number of respondents were concerned about the financial sustainability of the sector, potentially requiring government support to ensure that services remain available and accessible to all.The findings from this research provide vital insight into UK ECEC settings, acknowledging the crisis response to the pandemic and the short, medium and longer-term impact of COVID-19 on learners and practitioners, as well as the potential for reimagining learning if/when we revert to a post-COVID normal. We aim to inform emerging policy and practice across the four nations of the UK, to better support settings in dealing with current and future scenarios of this kind.
published_date 2021-03-08T04:12:56Z
_version_ 1718006187716247552
score 10.842861