No Cover Image

Journal article 76 views 9 downloads

Understanding the Impact of Initial COVID-19 Restrictions on Physical Activity, Wellbeing and Quality of Life in Shielding Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom Dialysing at Home versus In-Centre and Their Expe... / Joe Antoun, Daniel J. Brown, Daniel J. W. Jones, Nicholas C. Sangala, Robert J. Lewis, Anthony I. Shepherd, Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh, Laura Mason, Jo Corbett, Zoe L. Saynor

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Volume: 18, Issue: 6, Start page: 3144

Swansea University Authors: Melitta McNarry, Kelly Mackintosh, Laura Mason

  • 56448 (2).pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license

    Download (825.83KB)

Check full text

DOI (Published version): 10.3390/ijerph18063144

Abstract

Early in the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) containment strategy, people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were identified as extremely clinically vulnerable and subsequently asked to ‘shield’ at home where possible. The aim of this study was to investigate how these restrictions and the transition t...

Full description

Published in: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ISSN: 1660-4601
Published: MDPI AG 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56448
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
first_indexed 2021-03-15T15:50:09Z
last_indexed 2021-03-27T04:28:57Z
id cronfa56448
recordtype SURis
fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2021-03-26T14:57:32.0306971</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>56448</id><entry>2021-03-15</entry><title>Understanding the Impact of Initial COVID-19 Restrictions on Physical Activity, Wellbeing and Quality of Life in Shielding Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom Dialysing at Home versus In-Centre and Their Experiences with Telemedicine</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0813-7477</ORCID><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><name>Melitta McNarry</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-0355-6357</ORCID><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><name>Kelly Mackintosh</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>ef88a9ba99af7706e3e80e418f482e0a</sid><ORCID>0000-0002-9679-7063</ORCID><firstname>Laura</firstname><surname>Mason</surname><name>Laura Mason</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2021-03-15</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>Early in the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) containment strategy, people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were identified as extremely clinically vulnerable and subsequently asked to &#x2018;shield&#x2019; at home where possible. The aim of this study was to investigate how these restrictions and the transition to an increased reliance on telemedicine within clinical care of people living with kidney disease impacted the physical activity (PA), wellbeing and quality of life (QoL) of adults dialysing at home (HHD) or receiving in-centre haemodialysis (ICHD) in the UK. Individual semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with adults receiving HHD (n = 10) or ICHD (n = 10), were transcribed verbatim and, subsequently, thematically analysed. As result of the COVID-19 restrictions, PA, wellbeing and QoL of people with ESRD were found to have been hindered. However, widespread support for the continued use of telemedicine was strongly advocated and promoted independence and satisfaction in patient care. These findings highlight the need for more proactive care of people with ESRD if asked to shield again, as well as increased awareness of safe and appropriate PA resources to help with home-based PA and emotional wellbeing.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health</journal><volume>18</volume><journalNumber>6</journalNumber><paginationStart>3144</paginationStart><paginationEnd/><publisher>MDPI AG</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint/><issnElectronic>1660-4601</issnElectronic><keywords>quality of life; health behaviour; doctor&#x2013;patient communication; experience of illness and disease; exercise; user experiences; nephrology; internet technology; wellbeing</keywords><publishedDay>18</publishedDay><publishedMonth>3</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2021</publishedYear><publishedDate>2021-03-18</publishedDate><doi>10.3390/ijerph18063144</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2021-03-26T14:57:32.0306971</lastEdited><Created>2021-03-15T15:46:55.7530193</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Sports Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Joe</firstname><surname>Antoun</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Daniel J.</firstname><surname>Brown</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Daniel J. W.</firstname><surname>Jones</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Nicholas C.</firstname><surname>Sangala</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Robert J.</firstname><surname>Lewis</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Anthony I.</firstname><surname>Shepherd</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Melitta</firstname><surname>McNarry</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0813-7477</orcid><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Kelly</firstname><surname>Mackintosh</surname><orcid>0000-0003-0355-6357</orcid><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Laura</firstname><surname>Mason</surname><orcid>0000-0002-9679-7063</orcid><order>9</order></author><author><firstname>Jo</firstname><surname>Corbett</surname><order>10</order></author><author><firstname>Zoe L.</firstname><surname>Saynor</surname><order>11</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>56448__19555__4de8ec44af304d9b9733a5be19438f47.pdf</filename><originalFilename>56448 (2).pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2021-03-25T12:27:31.2428998</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>845653</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><documentNotes>Copyright: &#xA9; 2021 by the authors. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license</documentNotes><copyrightCorrect>true</copyrightCorrect><language>eng</language></document></documents><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2021-03-26T14:57:32.0306971 v2 56448 2021-03-15 Understanding the Impact of Initial COVID-19 Restrictions on Physical Activity, Wellbeing and Quality of Life in Shielding Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom Dialysing at Home versus In-Centre and Their Experiences with Telemedicine 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398 0000-0003-0813-7477 Melitta McNarry Melitta McNarry true false bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214 0000-0003-0355-6357 Kelly Mackintosh Kelly Mackintosh true false ef88a9ba99af7706e3e80e418f482e0a 0000-0002-9679-7063 Laura Mason Laura Mason true false 2021-03-15 STSC Early in the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) containment strategy, people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were identified as extremely clinically vulnerable and subsequently asked to ‘shield’ at home where possible. The aim of this study was to investigate how these restrictions and the transition to an increased reliance on telemedicine within clinical care of people living with kidney disease impacted the physical activity (PA), wellbeing and quality of life (QoL) of adults dialysing at home (HHD) or receiving in-centre haemodialysis (ICHD) in the UK. Individual semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with adults receiving HHD (n = 10) or ICHD (n = 10), were transcribed verbatim and, subsequently, thematically analysed. As result of the COVID-19 restrictions, PA, wellbeing and QoL of people with ESRD were found to have been hindered. However, widespread support for the continued use of telemedicine was strongly advocated and promoted independence and satisfaction in patient care. These findings highlight the need for more proactive care of people with ESRD if asked to shield again, as well as increased awareness of safe and appropriate PA resources to help with home-based PA and emotional wellbeing. Journal Article International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18 6 3144 MDPI AG 1660-4601 quality of life; health behaviour; doctor–patient communication; experience of illness and disease; exercise; user experiences; nephrology; internet technology; wellbeing 18 3 2021 2021-03-18 10.3390/ijerph18063144 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2021-03-26T14:57:32.0306971 2021-03-15T15:46:55.7530193 College of Engineering Sports Science Joe Antoun 1 Daniel J. Brown 2 Daniel J. W. Jones 3 Nicholas C. Sangala 4 Robert J. Lewis 5 Anthony I. Shepherd 6 Melitta McNarry 0000-0003-0813-7477 7 Kelly Mackintosh 0000-0003-0355-6357 8 Laura Mason 0000-0002-9679-7063 9 Jo Corbett 10 Zoe L. Saynor 11 56448__19555__4de8ec44af304d9b9733a5be19438f47.pdf 56448 (2).pdf 2021-03-25T12:27:31.2428998 Output 845653 application/pdf Version of Record true Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license true eng
title Understanding the Impact of Initial COVID-19 Restrictions on Physical Activity, Wellbeing and Quality of Life in Shielding Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom Dialysing at Home versus In-Centre and Their Experiences with Telemedicine
spellingShingle Understanding the Impact of Initial COVID-19 Restrictions on Physical Activity, Wellbeing and Quality of Life in Shielding Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom Dialysing at Home versus In-Centre and Their Experiences with Telemedicine
Melitta, McNarry
Kelly, Mackintosh
Laura, Mason
title_short Understanding the Impact of Initial COVID-19 Restrictions on Physical Activity, Wellbeing and Quality of Life in Shielding Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom Dialysing at Home versus In-Centre and Their Experiences with Telemedicine
title_full Understanding the Impact of Initial COVID-19 Restrictions on Physical Activity, Wellbeing and Quality of Life in Shielding Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom Dialysing at Home versus In-Centre and Their Experiences with Telemedicine
title_fullStr Understanding the Impact of Initial COVID-19 Restrictions on Physical Activity, Wellbeing and Quality of Life in Shielding Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom Dialysing at Home versus In-Centre and Their Experiences with Telemedicine
title_full_unstemmed Understanding the Impact of Initial COVID-19 Restrictions on Physical Activity, Wellbeing and Quality of Life in Shielding Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom Dialysing at Home versus In-Centre and Their Experiences with Telemedicine
title_sort Understanding the Impact of Initial COVID-19 Restrictions on Physical Activity, Wellbeing and Quality of Life in Shielding Adults with End-Stage Renal Disease in the United Kingdom Dialysing at Home versus In-Centre and Their Experiences with Telemedicine
author_id_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214
ef88a9ba99af7706e3e80e418f482e0a
author_id_fullname_str_mv 062f5697ff59f004bc8c713955988398_***_Melitta, McNarry
bdb20e3f31bcccf95c7bc116070c4214_***_Kelly, Mackintosh
ef88a9ba99af7706e3e80e418f482e0a_***_Laura, Mason
author Melitta, McNarry
Kelly, Mackintosh
Laura, Mason
author2 Joe Antoun
Daniel J. Brown
Daniel J. W. Jones
Nicholas C. Sangala
Robert J. Lewis
Anthony I. Shepherd
Melitta McNarry
Kelly Mackintosh
Laura Mason
Jo Corbett
Zoe L. Saynor
format Journal article
container_title International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
container_volume 18
container_issue 6
container_start_page 3144
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 1660-4601
doi_str_mv 10.3390/ijerph18063144
publisher MDPI AG
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Early in the coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) containment strategy, people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were identified as extremely clinically vulnerable and subsequently asked to ‘shield’ at home where possible. The aim of this study was to investigate how these restrictions and the transition to an increased reliance on telemedicine within clinical care of people living with kidney disease impacted the physical activity (PA), wellbeing and quality of life (QoL) of adults dialysing at home (HHD) or receiving in-centre haemodialysis (ICHD) in the UK. Individual semistructured telephone interviews were conducted with adults receiving HHD (n = 10) or ICHD (n = 10), were transcribed verbatim and, subsequently, thematically analysed. As result of the COVID-19 restrictions, PA, wellbeing and QoL of people with ESRD were found to have been hindered. However, widespread support for the continued use of telemedicine was strongly advocated and promoted independence and satisfaction in patient care. These findings highlight the need for more proactive care of people with ESRD if asked to shield again, as well as increased awareness of safe and appropriate PA resources to help with home-based PA and emotional wellbeing.
published_date 2021-03-18T04:19:59Z
_version_ 1712023456165396480
score 10.825796