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Association of rotating shift work schedules and the use of prescribed sleep medication: A prospective cohort study

Philip Tucker Orcid Logo, Mikko Härmä, Anneli Ojajärvi, Mika Kivimäki, Constanze Leineweber, Tuula Oksanen, Paula Salo, Jussi Vahtera

Journal of Sleep Research, Volume: 30, Issue: 6

Swansea University Author: Philip Tucker Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/jsr.13349

Abstract

We examined whether working rotating shifts, with or without night work, is associated with the purchase of prescribed sleep medication, and whether the association is dependent on age. Data were obtained from a longitudinal cohort study of Finnish public sector employees who responded to questions...

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Published in: Journal of Sleep Research
ISSN: 0962-1105 1365-2869
Published: Wiley 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56456
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spelling 2021-12-06T14:52:24.4876765 v2 56456 2021-03-17 Association of rotating shift work schedules and the use of prescribed sleep medication: A prospective cohort study 7d07250cf5f1cbaf8788af9f48cf000a 0000-0002-8105-0901 Philip Tucker Philip Tucker true false 2021-03-17 HPS We examined whether working rotating shifts, with or without night work, is associated with the purchase of prescribed sleep medication, and whether the association is dependent on age. Data were obtained from a longitudinal cohort study of Finnish public sector employees who responded to questions on work schedule and background characteristics in 2000, 2004 and 2008. The data were linked to national register data on redeemed prescriptions of hypnotic and sedative medications, with up to 11 years of follow-up. Age stratified Cox proportional hazard regression models were computed to examine incident use of medication comparing two groups of rotating shift workers (those working shifts that included night shifts and those whose schedules did not include night shifts) with day workers who worked in a similar range of occupations. Shift work with night shifts was associated with increased use of sleep medication in all age groups, after adjustments for sex, occupational status, marital status, alcohol consumption, smoking and physical activity levels (hazard ratio [HR], [95% confidence interval, CI] 1.14 [1.01–1.28] for age group ≤39 years; 1.33 [1.19–1.48] for age group 40–49 years; 1.28 [1.13–1.44] for age group ≥50 years). Shift work without nights was associated with medication use in the two older age groups (HR [95% CI] 1.14 [1.01–1.29] and 1.17 [1.05–1.31] for age groups 40–49 years and >50 years, respectively). These findings suggest that circadian disruption and older age puts rotating shift workers, and especially those who work nights, at increased risk of developing clinically significant levels of sleep problems. Journal Article Journal of Sleep Research 30 6 Wiley 0962-1105 1365-2869 14 6 2021 2021-06-14 10.1111/jsr.13349 COLLEGE NANME Psychology COLLEGE CODE HPS Swansea University 2021-12-06T14:52:24.4876765 2021-03-17T10:43:45.5885339 College of Human and Health Sciences Psychology Philip Tucker 0000-0002-8105-0901 1 Mikko Härmä 2 Anneli Ojajärvi 3 Mika Kivimäki 4 Constanze Leineweber 5 Tuula Oksanen 6 Paula Salo 7 Jussi Vahtera 8 56456__20161__c59d7f5c50bf467f9ebf87833cd1a2d2.pdf Tucker 2021 (sleep medication).pdf 2021-06-15T12:01:55.5231891 Output 405873 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2021 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Association of rotating shift work schedules and the use of prescribed sleep medication: A prospective cohort study
spellingShingle Association of rotating shift work schedules and the use of prescribed sleep medication: A prospective cohort study
Philip Tucker
title_short Association of rotating shift work schedules and the use of prescribed sleep medication: A prospective cohort study
title_full Association of rotating shift work schedules and the use of prescribed sleep medication: A prospective cohort study
title_fullStr Association of rotating shift work schedules and the use of prescribed sleep medication: A prospective cohort study
title_full_unstemmed Association of rotating shift work schedules and the use of prescribed sleep medication: A prospective cohort study
title_sort Association of rotating shift work schedules and the use of prescribed sleep medication: A prospective cohort study
author_id_str_mv 7d07250cf5f1cbaf8788af9f48cf000a
author_id_fullname_str_mv 7d07250cf5f1cbaf8788af9f48cf000a_***_Philip Tucker
author Philip Tucker
author2 Philip Tucker
Mikko Härmä
Anneli Ojajärvi
Mika Kivimäki
Constanze Leineweber
Tuula Oksanen
Paula Salo
Jussi Vahtera
format Journal article
container_title Journal of Sleep Research
container_volume 30
container_issue 6
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 0962-1105
1365-2869
doi_str_mv 10.1111/jsr.13349
publisher Wiley
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Psychology{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Psychology
document_store_str 1
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description We examined whether working rotating shifts, with or without night work, is associated with the purchase of prescribed sleep medication, and whether the association is dependent on age. Data were obtained from a longitudinal cohort study of Finnish public sector employees who responded to questions on work schedule and background characteristics in 2000, 2004 and 2008. The data were linked to national register data on redeemed prescriptions of hypnotic and sedative medications, with up to 11 years of follow-up. Age stratified Cox proportional hazard regression models were computed to examine incident use of medication comparing two groups of rotating shift workers (those working shifts that included night shifts and those whose schedules did not include night shifts) with day workers who worked in a similar range of occupations. Shift work with night shifts was associated with increased use of sleep medication in all age groups, after adjustments for sex, occupational status, marital status, alcohol consumption, smoking and physical activity levels (hazard ratio [HR], [95% confidence interval, CI] 1.14 [1.01–1.28] for age group ≤39 years; 1.33 [1.19–1.48] for age group 40–49 years; 1.28 [1.13–1.44] for age group ≥50 years). Shift work without nights was associated with medication use in the two older age groups (HR [95% CI] 1.14 [1.01–1.29] and 1.17 [1.05–1.31] for age groups 40–49 years and >50 years, respectively). These findings suggest that circadian disruption and older age puts rotating shift workers, and especially those who work nights, at increased risk of developing clinically significant levels of sleep problems.
published_date 2021-06-14T04:32:15Z
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