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Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Is Associated With Attenuated Interoceptive Responses to Self-Critical Rumination

Hayley Young, Jason Davies Orcid Logo, Gary Freegard, David Benton

Behavior Therapy, Volume: 52, Issue: 5, Pages: 1123 - 1136

Swansea University Authors: Hayley Young, Jason Davies Orcid Logo, Gary Freegard, David Benton

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Abstract

Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a prevalent and dangerous behavior. Those with a history of NSSI often report high levels of self-critical rumination (SCR), a form of negatively-valenced introspective self-referential processing. It is plausible that this overly analytical style of relating to the...

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Published in: Behavior Therapy
ISSN: 0005-7894
Published: Elsevier BV 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa56649
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Abstract: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a prevalent and dangerous behavior. Those with a history of NSSI often report high levels of self-critical rumination (SCR), a form of negatively-valenced introspective self-referential processing. It is plausible that this overly analytical style of relating to the self might hinder the ability to process interoceptive signals, thereby increasing the capacity to engage in behaviors that cause bodily harm. Two studies investigated whether trait or state SCR influenced aspects of interoception in those with and without a history of NSSI. In Study 1 (N = 180), irrespective of NSSI history, trait SCR was associated with finding attending to the heartbeat unpleasant. However, no associations were observed for interoceptive confidence, or metacognitive insight into their interoceptive abilities (confidence-accuracy correspondence). Trait SCR was associated with having higher interoceptive accuracy, but only in those without a history of NSSI. In Study 2 (N = 98), irrespective of NSSI history, state self-criticism led to a more negative interoceptive valence, and reduced participant’s metacognitive insight. In those without a history of NSSI, state self-criticism also increased interoceptive accuracy; an effect attenuated in those with NSSI. These findings suggest that those with NSSI are characterised by a blunted interoceptive response to negatively-valenced self-focused attention.
Keywords: Interoception; Rumination; Self-criticism; Self-focused attention; NSSI
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Issue: 5
Start Page: 1123
End Page: 1136