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Impacts of large and small barriers on fish assemblage composition assessed using environmental DNA metabarcoding

S Consuegra del Olmo Orcid Logo, Richard O'Rorke, Deiene Rodriguez Barreto, Sara Fernandez, Josh Jones Orcid Logo, Carlos Garcia De Leaniz Orcid Logo

Science of The Total Environment, Volume: 790, Start page: 148054

Swansea University Authors: S Consuegra del Olmo Orcid Logo, Richard O'Rorke, Deiene Rodriguez Barreto, Josh Jones Orcid Logo, Carlos Garcia De Leaniz Orcid Logo

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Abstract

River fragmentation caused by instream barriers is a leading cause of biodiversity loss, particularly for freshwater migratory fish, the vertebrate group that has suffered the steepest decline. However, most studies have tended to focus on the impacts of large dams on only a few taxa. We estimated t...

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Published in: Science of The Total Environment
ISSN: 0048-9697
Published: Elsevier BV 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57099
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However, most studies have tended to focus on the impacts of large dams on only a few taxa. We estimated the cumulative impact of both large and small barriers on fish species richness and relative abundance along an altitudinal gradient in the main stem of the River Allier (France). Using eDNA metabarcoding, we identified 24 fish zero-radius operational taxonomic units (zOTUs), corresponding to 26 species distributed along the main stem of the river. Elevation explained the greatest amount of variation in fish distribution, together with average flow, barrier density and its interaction with cumulative barrier height. Based on eDNA, the largest discontinuity in species richness was not related to the location of Pout&#xE8;s, the largest dam in the system, but located downstream from it. Our results indicate that, in addition to the more obvious effects of large dams on migratory fish such as the Atlantic salmon, the cumulative effects of small barriers can have widespread impacts on fish species richness and relative abundance, which should not be overlooked. We suggest that, as for other fragmented rivers, acting on numerous small barriers might bring about greater benefits in fish species richness than focusing only on the largest dams.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>Science of The Total Environment</journal><volume>790</volume><journalNumber/><paginationStart>148054</paginationStart><paginationEnd/><publisher>Elsevier BV</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>0048-9697</issnPrint><issnElectronic/><keywords>River connectivity; Habitat fragmentation; Dam; Rheophilic; eDNA</keywords><publishedDay>10</publishedDay><publishedMonth>10</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2021</publishedYear><publishedDate>2021-10-10</publishedDate><doi>10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.148054</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Biosciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>SBI</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2021-06-11T10:29:20.9681141</lastEdited><Created>2021-06-11T10:21:49.5603285</Created><path><level id="1">College of Science</level><level id="2">Biosciences</level></path><authors><author><firstname>S</firstname><surname>Consuegra del Olmo</surname><orcid>0000-0003-4403-2509</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Richard</firstname><surname>O'Rorke</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Deiene</firstname><surname>Rodriguez Barreto</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Sara</firstname><surname>Fernandez</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Josh</firstname><surname>Jones</surname><orcid>0000-0001-9047-9147</orcid><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>Carlos</firstname><surname>Garcia De Leaniz</surname><orcid>0000-0003-1650-2729</orcid><order>6</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>57099__20132__66c81a69d0be40d5ae7e7da285d4125d.pdf</filename><originalFilename>57099.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2021-06-11T10:28:04.5600491</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>1138529</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><documentNotes>&#xA9; 2021 The Authors. 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spelling 2021-06-11T10:29:20.9681141 v2 57099 2021-06-11 Impacts of large and small barriers on fish assemblage composition assessed using environmental DNA metabarcoding 241f2810ab8f56be53ca8af23e384c6e 0000-0003-4403-2509 S Consuegra del Olmo S Consuegra del Olmo true false cbb43a40c53e5ba9681a9022dcf0c753 Richard O'Rorke Richard O'Rorke true false a19d5dff034b6dc4c330b3aa7674eb83 Deiene Rodriguez Barreto Deiene Rodriguez Barreto true false ba449bb58016ff34c4c18abadabb40c6 0000-0001-9047-9147 Josh Jones Josh Jones true false 1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02 0000-0003-1650-2729 Carlos Garcia De Leaniz Carlos Garcia De Leaniz true false 2021-06-11 SBI River fragmentation caused by instream barriers is a leading cause of biodiversity loss, particularly for freshwater migratory fish, the vertebrate group that has suffered the steepest decline. However, most studies have tended to focus on the impacts of large dams on only a few taxa. We estimated the cumulative impact of both large and small barriers on fish species richness and relative abundance along an altitudinal gradient in the main stem of the River Allier (France). Using eDNA metabarcoding, we identified 24 fish zero-radius operational taxonomic units (zOTUs), corresponding to 26 species distributed along the main stem of the river. Elevation explained the greatest amount of variation in fish distribution, together with average flow, barrier density and its interaction with cumulative barrier height. Based on eDNA, the largest discontinuity in species richness was not related to the location of Poutès, the largest dam in the system, but located downstream from it. Our results indicate that, in addition to the more obvious effects of large dams on migratory fish such as the Atlantic salmon, the cumulative effects of small barriers can have widespread impacts on fish species richness and relative abundance, which should not be overlooked. We suggest that, as for other fragmented rivers, acting on numerous small barriers might bring about greater benefits in fish species richness than focusing only on the largest dams. Journal Article Science of The Total Environment 790 148054 Elsevier BV 0048-9697 River connectivity; Habitat fragmentation; Dam; Rheophilic; eDNA 10 10 2021 2021-10-10 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.148054 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2021-06-11T10:29:20.9681141 2021-06-11T10:21:49.5603285 College of Science Biosciences S Consuegra del Olmo 0000-0003-4403-2509 1 Richard O'Rorke 2 Deiene Rodriguez Barreto 3 Sara Fernandez 4 Josh Jones 0000-0001-9047-9147 5 Carlos Garcia De Leaniz 0000-0003-1650-2729 6 57099__20132__66c81a69d0be40d5ae7e7da285d4125d.pdf 57099.pdf 2021-06-11T10:28:04.5600491 Output 1138529 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2021 The Authors. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
title Impacts of large and small barriers on fish assemblage composition assessed using environmental DNA metabarcoding
spellingShingle Impacts of large and small barriers on fish assemblage composition assessed using environmental DNA metabarcoding
S Consuegra del Olmo
Richard O'Rorke
Deiene Rodriguez Barreto
Josh Jones
Carlos Garcia De Leaniz
title_short Impacts of large and small barriers on fish assemblage composition assessed using environmental DNA metabarcoding
title_full Impacts of large and small barriers on fish assemblage composition assessed using environmental DNA metabarcoding
title_fullStr Impacts of large and small barriers on fish assemblage composition assessed using environmental DNA metabarcoding
title_full_unstemmed Impacts of large and small barriers on fish assemblage composition assessed using environmental DNA metabarcoding
title_sort Impacts of large and small barriers on fish assemblage composition assessed using environmental DNA metabarcoding
author_id_str_mv 241f2810ab8f56be53ca8af23e384c6e
cbb43a40c53e5ba9681a9022dcf0c753
a19d5dff034b6dc4c330b3aa7674eb83
ba449bb58016ff34c4c18abadabb40c6
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author_id_fullname_str_mv 241f2810ab8f56be53ca8af23e384c6e_***_S Consuegra del Olmo
cbb43a40c53e5ba9681a9022dcf0c753_***_Richard O'Rorke
a19d5dff034b6dc4c330b3aa7674eb83_***_Deiene Rodriguez Barreto
ba449bb58016ff34c4c18abadabb40c6_***_Josh Jones
1c70acd0fd64edb0856b7cf34393ab02_***_Carlos Garcia De Leaniz
author S Consuegra del Olmo
Richard O'Rorke
Deiene Rodriguez Barreto
Josh Jones
Carlos Garcia De Leaniz
author2 S Consuegra del Olmo
Richard O'Rorke
Deiene Rodriguez Barreto
Sara Fernandez
Josh Jones
Carlos Garcia De Leaniz
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publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
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doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.148054
publisher Elsevier BV
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description River fragmentation caused by instream barriers is a leading cause of biodiversity loss, particularly for freshwater migratory fish, the vertebrate group that has suffered the steepest decline. However, most studies have tended to focus on the impacts of large dams on only a few taxa. We estimated the cumulative impact of both large and small barriers on fish species richness and relative abundance along an altitudinal gradient in the main stem of the River Allier (France). Using eDNA metabarcoding, we identified 24 fish zero-radius operational taxonomic units (zOTUs), corresponding to 26 species distributed along the main stem of the river. Elevation explained the greatest amount of variation in fish distribution, together with average flow, barrier density and its interaction with cumulative barrier height. Based on eDNA, the largest discontinuity in species richness was not related to the location of Poutès, the largest dam in the system, but located downstream from it. Our results indicate that, in addition to the more obvious effects of large dams on migratory fish such as the Atlantic salmon, the cumulative effects of small barriers can have widespread impacts on fish species richness and relative abundance, which should not be overlooked. We suggest that, as for other fragmented rivers, acting on numerous small barriers might bring about greater benefits in fish species richness than focusing only on the largest dams.
published_date 2021-10-10T04:33:32Z
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