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Life-course trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing

Charlotta Nilsen Orcid Logo, Alexander Darin-Mattsson, Martin Hyde Orcid Logo, Jonas W. Wastesson

Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, Volume: 50, Issue: 5, Pages: 593 - 600

Swansea University Author: Martin Hyde Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Aims:As populations are ageing worldwide, it is important to identify strategies to promote successful ageing. We investigate how working conditions throughout working life are associated with successful ageing in later life.Methods:Data from two nationally representative longitudinal Swedish survey...

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Published in: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
ISSN: 1403-4948 1651-1905
Published: SAGE Publications 2022
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57120
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spelling 2022-07-25T16:09:27.8380799 v2 57120 2021-06-14 Life-course trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing fce212ae306f4f36b2c328ec89c5da9b 0000-0002-9955-8121 Martin Hyde Martin Hyde true false 2021-06-14 PHAC Aims:As populations are ageing worldwide, it is important to identify strategies to promote successful ageing. We investigate how working conditions throughout working life are associated with successful ageing in later life.Methods:Data from two nationally representative longitudinal Swedish surveys were linked (n=674). In 1991, respondents were asked about their first occupation, occupations at ages 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 years and their last recorded occupation. Occupations were matched with job exposure matrices to measure working conditions at each of these time points. Random effects growth curve models were used to calculate intra-individual trajectories of working conditions. Successful ageing, operationalised using an index including social and leisure activity, cognitive and physical function and the absence of diseases, was measured at follow-up in 2014 (age 70 years and older). Multivariable ordered logistic regressions were used to assess the association between trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing.Results:Intellectually stimulating work; that is, substantive complexity, in the beginning of one’s career followed by an accumulation of more intellectually stimulating work throughout working life was associated with higher levels of successful ageing. In contrast, a history of stressful, hazardous or physically demanding work was associated with lower levels of successful ageing.Conclusions:Promoting a healthy workplace, by supporting intellectually stimulating work and reducing physically demanding and stressful jobs, may contribute to successful ageing after retirement. In particular, it appears that interventions early in one’s employment career could have positive, long-term effects. Journal Article Scandinavian Journal of Public Health 50 5 593 600 SAGE Publications 1403-4948 1651-1905 Work-related stress, substantive complexity, physical working conditions, accumulation, de-accumulation, successful ageing, longitudinal 1 7 2022 2022-07-01 10.1177/14034948211013279 COLLEGE NANME Public Health COLLEGE CODE PHAC Swansea University Marcus and Marianne Wallenberg Foundation (Grant Number MMW 2016.008); and Forte, Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (Grant Number 2019-01141 and 2016-07206) 2022-07-25T16:09:27.8380799 2021-06-14T14:46:23.8943537 Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences The Centre for Innovative Ageing Charlotta Nilsen 0000-0003-3662-5486 1 Alexander Darin-Mattsson 2 Martin Hyde 0000-0002-9955-8121 3 Jonas W. Wastesson 4 57120__20150__26ecc1f45d6b4585b5d049540d462aab.pdf 57120.pdf 2021-06-14T14:49:04.3332993 Output 203176 application/pdf Version of Record true © Author(s) 2021. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Life-course trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing
spellingShingle Life-course trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing
Martin Hyde
title_short Life-course trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing
title_full Life-course trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing
title_fullStr Life-course trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing
title_full_unstemmed Life-course trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing
title_sort Life-course trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing
author_id_str_mv fce212ae306f4f36b2c328ec89c5da9b
author_id_fullname_str_mv fce212ae306f4f36b2c328ec89c5da9b_***_Martin Hyde
author Martin Hyde
author2 Charlotta Nilsen
Alexander Darin-Mattsson
Martin Hyde
Jonas W. Wastesson
format Journal article
container_title Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
container_volume 50
container_issue 5
container_start_page 593
publishDate 2022
institution Swansea University
issn 1403-4948
1651-1905
doi_str_mv 10.1177/14034948211013279
publisher SAGE Publications
college_str Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofmedicinehealthandlifesciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences
department_str The Centre for Innovative Ageing{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences{{{_:::_}}}The Centre for Innovative Ageing
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description Aims:As populations are ageing worldwide, it is important to identify strategies to promote successful ageing. We investigate how working conditions throughout working life are associated with successful ageing in later life.Methods:Data from two nationally representative longitudinal Swedish surveys were linked (n=674). In 1991, respondents were asked about their first occupation, occupations at ages 25, 30, 35, 40, 45 and 50 years and their last recorded occupation. Occupations were matched with job exposure matrices to measure working conditions at each of these time points. Random effects growth curve models were used to calculate intra-individual trajectories of working conditions. Successful ageing, operationalised using an index including social and leisure activity, cognitive and physical function and the absence of diseases, was measured at follow-up in 2014 (age 70 years and older). Multivariable ordered logistic regressions were used to assess the association between trajectories of working conditions and successful ageing.Results:Intellectually stimulating work; that is, substantive complexity, in the beginning of one’s career followed by an accumulation of more intellectually stimulating work throughout working life was associated with higher levels of successful ageing. In contrast, a history of stressful, hazardous or physically demanding work was associated with lower levels of successful ageing.Conclusions:Promoting a healthy workplace, by supporting intellectually stimulating work and reducing physically demanding and stressful jobs, may contribute to successful ageing after retirement. In particular, it appears that interventions early in one’s employment career could have positive, long-term effects.
published_date 2022-07-01T04:05:20Z
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