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Associations of changes in reported and estimated protein and energy intake with changes in insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin, and BMI during the PREVIEW lifestyle intervention study / Mathijs Drummen, Tanja C Adam, Ian A Macdonald, Elli Jalo, Thomas M Larssen, J Alfredo Martinez, Teodora Handjiev-Darlenska, Jennie Brand-Miller, Sally D Poppitt, Gareth Stratton, Kirsi H Pietiläinen, Moira A Taylor, Santiago Navas-Carretero, Svetoslav Handjiev, Roslyn Muirhead, Marta P Silvestre, Nils Swindell, Maija Huttunen-Lenz, Wolfgang Schlicht, Tony Lam, Jouko Sundvall, Laura Raman, Edith Feskens, Angelo Tremblay, Anne Raben, Margriet S Westerterp-Plantenga

The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Swansea University Author: Gareth Stratton

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DOI (Published version): 10.1093/ajcn/nqab247

Abstract

BackgroundObserved associations of high-protein diets with changes in insulin resistance are inconclusive.ObjectivesWe aimed to assess associations of changes in both reported and estimated protein (PRep; PEst) and energy intake (EIRep; EIEst) with changes in HOMA-IR, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), an...

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Published in: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
ISSN: 0002-9165 1938-3207
Published: Oxford University Press (OUP) 2021
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2021-09-17T11:07:05.5320284</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>57183</id><entry>2021-06-23</entry><title>Associations of changes in reported and estimated protein and energy intake with changes in insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin, and BMI during the PREVIEW lifestyle intervention study</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01</sid><ORCID>0000-0001-5618-0803</ORCID><firstname>Gareth</firstname><surname>Stratton</surname><name>Gareth Stratton</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2021-06-23</date><deptcode>STSC</deptcode><abstract>BackgroundObserved associations of high-protein diets with changes in insulin resistance are inconclusive.ObjectivesWe aimed to assess associations of changes in both reported and estimated protein (PRep; PEst) and energy intake (EIRep; EIEst) with changes in HOMA-IR, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and BMI (in kg/m2), in 1822 decreasing to 833 adults (week 156) with overweight and prediabetes, during the 3-y PREVIEW (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle intervention and population studies In Europe and around the World) study on weight-loss maintenance. Eating behavior and measurement errors (MEs) of dietary intake were assessed. Thus, observational post hoc analyses were applied.MethodsAssociations of changes in EIEst, EIRep, PEst, and PRep with changes in HOMA-IR, HbA1c, and BMI were determined by linear mixed-model analysis in 2 arms [high-protein-low-glycemic-index (GI) diet and moderate-protein-moderate-GI diet] of the PREVIEW study. EIEst was derived from energy requirement: total energy expenditure = basal metabolic rate &#xD7; physical activity level; PEst from urinary nitrogen, and urea. MEs were calculated as [(EIEst &#x2212; EIRep)/EIEst] &#xD7; 100% and [(PRep &#x2212; PEst)/PEst] &#xD7; 100%. Eating behavior was determined using the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire, examining cognitive dietary restraint, disinhibition, and hunger.ResultsIncreases in PEst and PRep and decreases in EIEst and EIRep were associated with decreases in BMI, but not independently with decreases in HOMA-IR. Increases in PEst and PRep were associated with decreases in HbA1c. PRep and EIRep showed larger changes and stronger associations than PEst and EIEst. Mean &#xB1; SD MEs of EIRep and PRep were 38% &#xB1; 9% and 14% &#xB1; 4%, respectively; ME changes in EIRep and En% PRep were positively associated with changes in BMI and cognitive dietary restraint and inversely with disinhibition and hunger.ConclusionsDuring weight-loss maintenance in adults with prediabetes, increase in protein intake and decrease in energy intake were not associated with decrease in HOMA-IR beyond associations with decrease in BMI. Increases in PEst and PRep were associated with decrease in HbA1c.This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01777893.</abstract><type>Journal Article</type><journal>The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition</journal><volume>0</volume><journalNumber/><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher>Oxford University Press (OUP)</publisher><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint>0002-9165</issnPrint><issnElectronic>1938-3207</issnElectronic><keywords>obesity, prediabetes, measurement error of dietary intake reporting, urinary nitrogen as biomarker, basal metabolic rate, physical activity level</keywords><publishedDay>10</publishedDay><publishedMonth>8</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2021</publishedYear><publishedDate>2021-08-10</publishedDate><doi>10.1093/ajcn/nqab247</doi><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Sport and Exercise Sciences</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>STSC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2021-09-17T11:07:05.5320284</lastEdited><Created>2021-06-23T10:11:35.5881602</Created><path><level id="1">College of Engineering</level><level id="2">Sports Science</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Mathijs</firstname><surname>Drummen</surname><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Tanja C</firstname><surname>Adam</surname><order>2</order></author><author><firstname>Ian A</firstname><surname>Macdonald</surname><order>3</order></author><author><firstname>Elli</firstname><surname>Jalo</surname><order>4</order></author><author><firstname>Thomas M</firstname><surname>Larssen</surname><order>5</order></author><author><firstname>J Alfredo</firstname><surname>Martinez</surname><order>6</order></author><author><firstname>Teodora</firstname><surname>Handjiev-Darlenska</surname><order>7</order></author><author><firstname>Jennie</firstname><surname>Brand-Miller</surname><order>8</order></author><author><firstname>Sally D</firstname><surname>Poppitt</surname><order>9</order></author><author><firstname>Gareth</firstname><surname>Stratton</surname><orcid>0000-0001-5618-0803</orcid><order>10</order></author><author><firstname>Kirsi H</firstname><surname>Pietil&#xE4;inen</surname><order>11</order></author><author><firstname>Moira A</firstname><surname>Taylor</surname><order>12</order></author><author><firstname>Santiago</firstname><surname>Navas-Carretero</surname><order>13</order></author><author><firstname>Svetoslav</firstname><surname>Handjiev</surname><order>14</order></author><author><firstname>Roslyn</firstname><surname>Muirhead</surname><order>15</order></author><author><firstname>Marta P</firstname><surname>Silvestre</surname><order>16</order></author><author><firstname>Nils</firstname><surname>Swindell</surname><order>17</order></author><author><firstname>Maija</firstname><surname>Huttunen-Lenz</surname><order>18</order></author><author><firstname>Wolfgang</firstname><surname>Schlicht</surname><order>19</order></author><author><firstname>Tony</firstname><surname>Lam</surname><order>20</order></author><author><firstname>Jouko</firstname><surname>Sundvall</surname><order>21</order></author><author><firstname>Laura</firstname><surname>Raman</surname><order>22</order></author><author><firstname>Edith</firstname><surname>Feskens</surname><order>23</order></author><author><firstname>Angelo</firstname><surname>Tremblay</surname><order>24</order></author><author><firstname>Anne</firstname><surname>Raben</surname><order>25</order></author><author><firstname>Margriet S</firstname><surname>Westerterp-Plantenga</surname><order>26</order></author></authors><documents><document><filename>57183__20902__b6c158a7acf941caa9ae8452c89f7788.pdf</filename><originalFilename>57183.pdf</originalFilename><uploaded>2021-09-17T11:00:03.4049011</uploaded><type>Output</type><contentLength>356398</contentLength><contentType>application/pdf</contentType><version>Version of Record</version><cronfaStatus>true</cronfaStatus><action/><documentNotes>&#xA9; The Author(s) 2021. 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spelling 2021-09-17T11:07:05.5320284 v2 57183 2021-06-23 Associations of changes in reported and estimated protein and energy intake with changes in insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin, and BMI during the PREVIEW lifestyle intervention study 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01 0000-0001-5618-0803 Gareth Stratton Gareth Stratton true false 2021-06-23 STSC BackgroundObserved associations of high-protein diets with changes in insulin resistance are inconclusive.ObjectivesWe aimed to assess associations of changes in both reported and estimated protein (PRep; PEst) and energy intake (EIRep; EIEst) with changes in HOMA-IR, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and BMI (in kg/m2), in 1822 decreasing to 833 adults (week 156) with overweight and prediabetes, during the 3-y PREVIEW (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle intervention and population studies In Europe and around the World) study on weight-loss maintenance. Eating behavior and measurement errors (MEs) of dietary intake were assessed. Thus, observational post hoc analyses were applied.MethodsAssociations of changes in EIEst, EIRep, PEst, and PRep with changes in HOMA-IR, HbA1c, and BMI were determined by linear mixed-model analysis in 2 arms [high-protein-low-glycemic-index (GI) diet and moderate-protein-moderate-GI diet] of the PREVIEW study. EIEst was derived from energy requirement: total energy expenditure = basal metabolic rate × physical activity level; PEst from urinary nitrogen, and urea. MEs were calculated as [(EIEst − EIRep)/EIEst] × 100% and [(PRep − PEst)/PEst] × 100%. Eating behavior was determined using the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire, examining cognitive dietary restraint, disinhibition, and hunger.ResultsIncreases in PEst and PRep and decreases in EIEst and EIRep were associated with decreases in BMI, but not independently with decreases in HOMA-IR. Increases in PEst and PRep were associated with decreases in HbA1c. PRep and EIRep showed larger changes and stronger associations than PEst and EIEst. Mean ± SD MEs of EIRep and PRep were 38% ± 9% and 14% ± 4%, respectively; ME changes in EIRep and En% PRep were positively associated with changes in BMI and cognitive dietary restraint and inversely with disinhibition and hunger.ConclusionsDuring weight-loss maintenance in adults with prediabetes, increase in protein intake and decrease in energy intake were not associated with decrease in HOMA-IR beyond associations with decrease in BMI. Increases in PEst and PRep were associated with decrease in HbA1c.This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01777893. Journal Article The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 0 Oxford University Press (OUP) 0002-9165 1938-3207 obesity, prediabetes, measurement error of dietary intake reporting, urinary nitrogen as biomarker, basal metabolic rate, physical activity level 10 8 2021 2021-08-10 10.1093/ajcn/nqab247 COLLEGE NANME Sport and Exercise Sciences COLLEGE CODE STSC Swansea University 2021-09-17T11:07:05.5320284 2021-06-23T10:11:35.5881602 College of Engineering Sports Science Mathijs Drummen 1 Tanja C Adam 2 Ian A Macdonald 3 Elli Jalo 4 Thomas M Larssen 5 J Alfredo Martinez 6 Teodora Handjiev-Darlenska 7 Jennie Brand-Miller 8 Sally D Poppitt 9 Gareth Stratton 0000-0001-5618-0803 10 Kirsi H Pietiläinen 11 Moira A Taylor 12 Santiago Navas-Carretero 13 Svetoslav Handjiev 14 Roslyn Muirhead 15 Marta P Silvestre 16 Nils Swindell 17 Maija Huttunen-Lenz 18 Wolfgang Schlicht 19 Tony Lam 20 Jouko Sundvall 21 Laura Raman 22 Edith Feskens 23 Angelo Tremblay 24 Anne Raben 25 Margriet S Westerterp-Plantenga 26 57183__20902__b6c158a7acf941caa9ae8452c89f7788.pdf 57183.pdf 2021-09-17T11:00:03.4049011 Output 356398 application/pdf Version of Record true © The Author(s) 2021. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License true eng
title Associations of changes in reported and estimated protein and energy intake with changes in insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin, and BMI during the PREVIEW lifestyle intervention study
spellingShingle Associations of changes in reported and estimated protein and energy intake with changes in insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin, and BMI during the PREVIEW lifestyle intervention study
Gareth, Stratton
title_short Associations of changes in reported and estimated protein and energy intake with changes in insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin, and BMI during the PREVIEW lifestyle intervention study
title_full Associations of changes in reported and estimated protein and energy intake with changes in insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin, and BMI during the PREVIEW lifestyle intervention study
title_fullStr Associations of changes in reported and estimated protein and energy intake with changes in insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin, and BMI during the PREVIEW lifestyle intervention study
title_full_unstemmed Associations of changes in reported and estimated protein and energy intake with changes in insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin, and BMI during the PREVIEW lifestyle intervention study
title_sort Associations of changes in reported and estimated protein and energy intake with changes in insulin resistance, glycated hemoglobin, and BMI during the PREVIEW lifestyle intervention study
author_id_str_mv 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01
author_id_fullname_str_mv 6d62b2ed126961bed81a94a2beba8a01_***_Gareth, Stratton
author Gareth, Stratton
author2 Mathijs Drummen
Tanja C Adam
Ian A Macdonald
Elli Jalo
Thomas M Larssen
J Alfredo Martinez
Teodora Handjiev-Darlenska
Jennie Brand-Miller
Sally D Poppitt
Gareth Stratton
Kirsi H Pietiläinen
Moira A Taylor
Santiago Navas-Carretero
Svetoslav Handjiev
Roslyn Muirhead
Marta P Silvestre
Nils Swindell
Maija Huttunen-Lenz
Wolfgang Schlicht
Tony Lam
Jouko Sundvall
Laura Raman
Edith Feskens
Angelo Tremblay
Anne Raben
Margriet S Westerterp-Plantenga
format Journal article
container_title The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
container_volume 0
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 0002-9165
1938-3207
doi_str_mv 10.1093/ajcn/nqab247
publisher Oxford University Press (OUP)
college_str College of Engineering
hierarchytype
hierarchy_top_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_top_title College of Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofengineering
hierarchy_parent_title College of Engineering
department_str Sports Science{{{_:::_}}}College of Engineering{{{_:::_}}}Sports Science
document_store_str 1
active_str 0
description BackgroundObserved associations of high-protein diets with changes in insulin resistance are inconclusive.ObjectivesWe aimed to assess associations of changes in both reported and estimated protein (PRep; PEst) and energy intake (EIRep; EIEst) with changes in HOMA-IR, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and BMI (in kg/m2), in 1822 decreasing to 833 adults (week 156) with overweight and prediabetes, during the 3-y PREVIEW (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle intervention and population studies In Europe and around the World) study on weight-loss maintenance. Eating behavior and measurement errors (MEs) of dietary intake were assessed. Thus, observational post hoc analyses were applied.MethodsAssociations of changes in EIEst, EIRep, PEst, and PRep with changes in HOMA-IR, HbA1c, and BMI were determined by linear mixed-model analysis in 2 arms [high-protein-low-glycemic-index (GI) diet and moderate-protein-moderate-GI diet] of the PREVIEW study. EIEst was derived from energy requirement: total energy expenditure = basal metabolic rate × physical activity level; PEst from urinary nitrogen, and urea. MEs were calculated as [(EIEst − EIRep)/EIEst] × 100% and [(PRep − PEst)/PEst] × 100%. Eating behavior was determined using the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire, examining cognitive dietary restraint, disinhibition, and hunger.ResultsIncreases in PEst and PRep and decreases in EIEst and EIRep were associated with decreases in BMI, but not independently with decreases in HOMA-IR. Increases in PEst and PRep were associated with decreases in HbA1c. PRep and EIRep showed larger changes and stronger associations than PEst and EIEst. Mean ± SD MEs of EIRep and PRep were 38% ± 9% and 14% ± 4%, respectively; ME changes in EIRep and En% PRep were positively associated with changes in BMI and cognitive dietary restraint and inversely with disinhibition and hunger.ConclusionsDuring weight-loss maintenance in adults with prediabetes, increase in protein intake and decrease in energy intake were not associated with decrease in HOMA-IR beyond associations with decrease in BMI. Increases in PEst and PRep were associated with decrease in HbA1c.This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01777893.
published_date 2021-08-10T04:23:47Z
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