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Limitations of using surrogates for behaviour classification of accelerometer data: refining methods using random forest models in Caprids

Eleanor R. Dickinson Orcid Logo, Joshua P. Twining, Rory Wilson Orcid Logo, Philip A. Stephens, Jennie Westander, Nikki Marks, David M. Scantlebury

Movement Ecology, Volume: 9, Issue: 1

Swansea University Author: Rory Wilson Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Animal-attached devices can be used on cryptic species to measure their movement and behaviour, enabling unprecedented insights into fundamental aspects of animal ecology and behaviour. However, direct observations of subjects are often still necessary to translate biologging data accurately into me...

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Published in: Movement Ecology
ISSN: 2051-3933
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57185
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first_indexed 2021-06-23T11:04:56Z
last_indexed 2021-06-24T03:23:03Z
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spelling v2 57185 2021-06-23 Limitations of using surrogates for behaviour classification of accelerometer data: refining methods using random forest models in Caprids 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc 0000-0003-3177-0177 Rory Wilson Rory Wilson true false 2021-06-23 SBI Animal-attached devices can be used on cryptic species to measure their movement and behaviour, enabling unprecedented insights into fundamental aspects of animal ecology and behaviour. However, direct observations of subjects are often still necessary to translate biologging data accurately into meaningful behaviours. As many elusive species cannot easily be observed in the wild, captive or domestic surrogates are typically used to calibrate data from devices. However, the utility of this approach remains equivocal. Journal Article Movement Ecology 9 1 Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2051-3933 Tri-axial accelerometry, Tri-axial magnetometry, Behaviour identification, Biologging, Alpine ibex, Pygmy goat, Terrain slope 1 12 2021 2021-12-01 10.1186/s40462-021-00265-7 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40462-021-00265-7 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2022-07-07T15:31:34.4751142 2021-06-23T12:03:24.6035884 College of Science Biosciences Eleanor R. Dickinson 0000-0001-5183-5049 1 Joshua P. Twining 2 Rory Wilson 0000-0003-3177-0177 3 Philip A. Stephens 4 Jennie Westander 5 Nikki Marks 6 David M. Scantlebury 7 57185__20223__b0cd216082104aa998ac8cfdc6583f06.pdf 57185.pdf 2021-06-23T12:05:16.5522416 Output 1583479 application/pdf Version of Record true © The Author(s). 2021 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Limitations of using surrogates for behaviour classification of accelerometer data: refining methods using random forest models in Caprids
spellingShingle Limitations of using surrogates for behaviour classification of accelerometer data: refining methods using random forest models in Caprids
Rory Wilson
title_short Limitations of using surrogates for behaviour classification of accelerometer data: refining methods using random forest models in Caprids
title_full Limitations of using surrogates for behaviour classification of accelerometer data: refining methods using random forest models in Caprids
title_fullStr Limitations of using surrogates for behaviour classification of accelerometer data: refining methods using random forest models in Caprids
title_full_unstemmed Limitations of using surrogates for behaviour classification of accelerometer data: refining methods using random forest models in Caprids
title_sort Limitations of using surrogates for behaviour classification of accelerometer data: refining methods using random forest models in Caprids
author_id_str_mv 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc
author_id_fullname_str_mv 017bc6dd155098860945dc6249c4e9bc_***_Rory Wilson
author Rory Wilson
author2 Eleanor R. Dickinson
Joshua P. Twining
Rory Wilson
Philip A. Stephens
Jennie Westander
Nikki Marks
David M. Scantlebury
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container_title Movement Ecology
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container_issue 1
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 2051-3933
doi_str_mv 10.1186/s40462-021-00265-7
publisher Springer Science and Business Media LLC
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
url http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40462-021-00265-7
document_store_str 1
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description Animal-attached devices can be used on cryptic species to measure their movement and behaviour, enabling unprecedented insights into fundamental aspects of animal ecology and behaviour. However, direct observations of subjects are often still necessary to translate biologging data accurately into meaningful behaviours. As many elusive species cannot easily be observed in the wild, captive or domestic surrogates are typically used to calibrate data from devices. However, the utility of this approach remains equivocal.
published_date 2021-12-01T15:31:32Z
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