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E-Thesis 1005 views 306 downloads

Quantitative estimation of vegetation traits and temporal dynamics using 3-D radiative transfer models, high-resolution hyperspectral images and satellite imagery / Alberto Hornero

Swansea University Author: Alberto Hornero

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    Copyright: The author, Alberto Hornero Luque, 2021.

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DOI (Published version): 10.23889/SUthesis.57329

Abstract

Large-scale monitoring of vegetation dynamics by remote sensing is key to detecting early signs of vegetation decline. Spectral-based indicators of phys-iological plant traits (PTs) have the potential to quantify variations in pho-tosynthetic pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence emission, and structur...

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Published: Swansea 2021
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Doctoral
Degree name: Ph.D
Supervisor: North Peter R.J. ; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo J.
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57329
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Abstract: Large-scale monitoring of vegetation dynamics by remote sensing is key to detecting early signs of vegetation decline. Spectral-based indicators of phys-iological plant traits (PTs) have the potential to quantify variations in pho-tosynthetic pigments, chlorophyll fluorescence emission, and structural changes of vegetation as a function of stress. However, the specific response of PTs to disease-induced decline in heterogeneous canopies remains largely unknown, which is critical for the early detection of irreversible damage at different scales. Four specific objectives were defined in this research: i) to assess the feasibility of modelling the incidence and severity of Phytophthora cinnamomi and Xylella fastidiosa based on PTs and biophysical properties of vegetation; ii) to assess non-visual early indicators, iii) to retrieve PT using radiative transfer models (RTM), high-resolution imagery and satellite observations; and iv) to establish the basis for scaling up PTs at different spatial resolutions using RTM for their retrieval in different vegetation co-vers. This thesis integrates different approaches combining field data, air- and space-borne imagery, and physical and empirical models that allow the retrieval of indicators and the evaluation of each component’s contribution to understanding temporal variations of disease-induced symptoms in heter-ogeneous canopies. Furthermore, the effects associated with the understory are introduced, showing not only their impact but also providing a compre-hensive model to account for it. Consequently, a new methodology has been established to detect vegetation health processes and the influence of biotic and abiotic factors, considering different components of the canopy and their impact on the aggregated signal. It is expected that, using the presented methods, existing remote sensors and future developments, the ability to detect and assess vegetation health globally will have a substantial impact not only on socio-economic factors, but also on the preservation of our eco-system as a whole.
Item Description: ORCiD identifier https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8434-2168
Keywords: High-resolution imagery, Hyperspectral, Thermal, HyPlant, Satellite data, Sentinel-2, Radiative transfer modelling, Understory, Chlorophyll fluorescence, SIF, Heterogeneous canopies, Temporal change, Disease monitoring, Forest dieback, Xylella fastidiosa, Phytophthora cinnamomi
College: Faculty of Science and Engineering