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Higher Education Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning during COVID-19—A Comparative Study

Desireé Cranfield Orcid Logo, Andrea Tick, Isabella M. Venter, Renette J. Blignaut, Karen Renaud

Education Sciences, Volume: 11, Issue: 8, Start page: 403

Swansea University Author: Desireé Cranfield Orcid Logo

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Abstract

The pandemic and subsequent ‘lockdown’ has dramatically changed the educational landscape of higher education institutions. Pre-covid-19, traditional universities had choices in pedagogical practice, which included a variety of teaching delivery modes. Overnight, a single mode of delivery became the...

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Published in: Education Sciences
ISSN: 2227-7102
Published: MDPI AG 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57484
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first_indexed 2021-08-02T09:51:22Z
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spelling 2021-08-18T15:44:35.7640602 v2 57484 2021-07-30 Higher Education Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning during COVID-19—A Comparative Study 3f8fe4194470d374d18e4738089a6ab1 0000-0002-3082-687X Desireé Cranfield Desireé Cranfield true false 2021-07-30 BBU The pandemic and subsequent ‘lockdown’ has dramatically changed the educational landscape of higher education institutions. Pre-covid-19, traditional universities had choices in pedagogical practice, which included a variety of teaching delivery modes. Overnight, a single mode of delivery became the only option for traditional higher education institutions. All services had to be migrated to digital platforms, leading to a period of “emergency eLearning”. The full impact of this sudden shift to digital platforms on all cohorts of students is still uncertain. A measure of disruption to the normal student learning experience, especially for those attending traditional universities, was inevitable. Moreover, this disruption was varied depending on the University’s country and the country’s lockdown rules. This international, comparative, quantitative research project aimed to investigate and understand the higher education students’ perceptions of emergency eLearning during the first wave of COVID-19. Experiences of students at universities in three countries were evaluated in terms of four dimensions: 1) home learning environment, 2) engagement, 3) participation preference, and 4) impact on learning skills. The research revealed significant differences between the participating universities. The most important differences were in the ‘home learning environment’, followed by ‘engagement’ and the perception of ‘impact on learning skills’. The differences in the ‘home learning environment’ can be attributed to the differing economic and digital development of the surveyed countries: South Africa, Wales, and Hungary. Finally, different cultural backgrounds suggest a noticeable difference in student engagement, participation, and learning skills. Journal Article Education Sciences 11 8 403 MDPI AG 2227-7102 emergency online learning; higher education teaching; COVID-19; education; student learning experience; student participation; student engagement. 4 8 2021 2021-08-04 10.3390/educsci11080403 COLLEGE NANME Business COLLEGE CODE BBU Swansea University Not Required 2021-08-18T15:44:35.7640602 2021-07-30T14:16:07.9554870 School of Management Business Desireé Cranfield 0000-0002-3082-687X 1 Andrea Tick 2 Isabella M. Venter 3 Renette J. Blignaut 4 Karen Renaud 5 57484__20666__5584525ff5cf430f9abcec0a547f4127.pdf 57484.pdf 2021-08-18T15:43:27.7959510 Output 3428525 application/pdf Version of Record true Copyright: © 2021 by the authors. This is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Higher Education Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning during COVID-19—A Comparative Study
spellingShingle Higher Education Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning during COVID-19—A Comparative Study
Desireé Cranfield
title_short Higher Education Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning during COVID-19—A Comparative Study
title_full Higher Education Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning during COVID-19—A Comparative Study
title_fullStr Higher Education Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning during COVID-19—A Comparative Study
title_full_unstemmed Higher Education Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning during COVID-19—A Comparative Study
title_sort Higher Education Students’ Perceptions of Online Learning during COVID-19—A Comparative Study
author_id_str_mv 3f8fe4194470d374d18e4738089a6ab1
author_id_fullname_str_mv 3f8fe4194470d374d18e4738089a6ab1_***_Desireé Cranfield
author Desireé Cranfield
author2 Desireé Cranfield
Andrea Tick
Isabella M. Venter
Renette J. Blignaut
Karen Renaud
format Journal article
container_title Education Sciences
container_volume 11
container_issue 8
container_start_page 403
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 2227-7102
doi_str_mv 10.3390/educsci11080403
publisher MDPI AG
college_str School of Management
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hierarchy_top_title School of Management
hierarchy_parent_id schoolofmanagement
hierarchy_parent_title School of Management
department_str Business{{{_:::_}}}School of Management{{{_:::_}}}Business
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description The pandemic and subsequent ‘lockdown’ has dramatically changed the educational landscape of higher education institutions. Pre-covid-19, traditional universities had choices in pedagogical practice, which included a variety of teaching delivery modes. Overnight, a single mode of delivery became the only option for traditional higher education institutions. All services had to be migrated to digital platforms, leading to a period of “emergency eLearning”. The full impact of this sudden shift to digital platforms on all cohorts of students is still uncertain. A measure of disruption to the normal student learning experience, especially for those attending traditional universities, was inevitable. Moreover, this disruption was varied depending on the University’s country and the country’s lockdown rules. This international, comparative, quantitative research project aimed to investigate and understand the higher education students’ perceptions of emergency eLearning during the first wave of COVID-19. Experiences of students at universities in three countries were evaluated in terms of four dimensions: 1) home learning environment, 2) engagement, 3) participation preference, and 4) impact on learning skills. The research revealed significant differences between the participating universities. The most important differences were in the ‘home learning environment’, followed by ‘engagement’ and the perception of ‘impact on learning skills’. The differences in the ‘home learning environment’ can be attributed to the differing economic and digital development of the surveyed countries: South Africa, Wales, and Hungary. Finally, different cultural backgrounds suggest a noticeable difference in student engagement, participation, and learning skills.
published_date 2021-08-04T04:13:39Z
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