No Cover Image

Journal article 35 views 7 downloads

Unravelling the Spatial and Temporal Plasticity of Eelgrass Meadows / Chiara Bertelli, James Bull, Leanne C. Cullen-Unsworth, Richard Unsworth

Frontiers in Plant Science, Volume: 12

Swansea University Authors: Chiara Bertelli, James Bull, Richard Unsworth

  • fpls-12-664523.pdf

    PDF | Version of Record

    Copyright © 2021 Bertelli, Bull, Cullen-Unsworth and Unsworth. This is an openaccess article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY)

    Download (1.27MB)

Abstract

The phenotypic plasticity of seagrasses enables them to adapt to changes in environmental conditions and withstand or recover from disturbance. This plasticity was demonstrated in the large variation recorded throughout a suite of bioindicators measured within Zostera marina meadows around Wales and...

Full description

Published in: Frontiers in Plant Science
ISSN: 1664-462X
Published: Frontiers Media SA 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57627
Tags: Add Tag
No Tags, Be the first to tag this record!
Abstract: The phenotypic plasticity of seagrasses enables them to adapt to changes in environmental conditions and withstand or recover from disturbance. This plasticity was demonstrated in the large variation recorded throughout a suite of bioindicators measured within Zostera marina meadows around Wales and SW England, United Kingdom. Short-term spatial data were analysed alongside long-term monitoring data to determine which bioindicators best described the status of eelgrass meadows subjected to a range of environmental and anthropogenic drivers. Shoot density, leaf length, leaf nutrients (C:N ratio, %N, %P) including stable isotope of δ13C and δ15N provided insight into the longer-term status of the meadows studied and a good indication of the causes of long-term decline. Meadows ranged from those in the Isles of Scilly with little evidence of impact to those in Littlewick in Milford Haven, Wales that showed the highest levels of impacts of all sites. Bioindicators at Littlewick showed clear warning signs of nutrient loading reflected in the long-term decline in shoot density, and prevalence of wasting disease. This study highlights the need for continuous consistent monitoring and the benefits of using extra tools in the form of shoot nutrient analysis to determine causes of decline.
Keywords: Zostera marina, plasticity, bioindicator, water quality, nutrient, resilience
College: College of Science