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Protocol for Take-home naloxone In Multicentre Emergency (TIME) settings: feasibility study / Matthew Jones, Fiona Bell, Jonathan Benger, Sarah Black, Penny Buykx, Simon Dixon, Timothy Driscoll, Bridie Evans, Adrian Edwards, Gordon Fuller, Steve Goodacre, Rebecca Hoskins, Jane Hughes, Ann John, Jenna Jones, Chris Moore, Fiona Sampson, Alan Watkins, Helen Snooks

Pilot and Feasibility Studies, Volume: 6, Issue: 1

Swansea University Authors: Matthew Jones, Timothy Driscoll, Bridie Evans, Ann John, Jenna Jones, Chris Moore, Alan Watkins, Helen Snooks

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Abstract

BackgroundOpioids, such as heroin, kill more people worldwide by overdose than any other type of drug, and death rates associated with opioid poisoning in the UK are at record levels (World Drug Report 2018 [Internet]. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://www.unodc.org/wdr2018/; Deaths relate...

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Published in: Pilot and Feasibility Studies
ISSN: 2055-5784
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2020
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57664
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Abstract: BackgroundOpioids, such as heroin, kill more people worldwide by overdose than any other type of drug, and death rates associated with opioid poisoning in the UK are at record levels (World Drug Report 2018 [Internet]. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://www.unodc.org/wdr2018/; Deaths related to drug poisoning in England and Wales - Office for National Statistics [Internet]. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsrelatedtodrugpoisoninginenglandandwales/2018registrations). Naloxone is an opioid antagonist which can be distributed in ‘kits’ for administration by witnesses in an overdose emergency. This intervention is known as take-home naloxone (THN). We know that THN can save lives on an individual level, but there is currently limited evidence about the effectiveness of THN distribution on an aggregate level, in specialist drug service settings or in emergency service settings. Notably, we do not know whether THN kits reduce deaths from opioid overdose in at-risk populations, if there are unforeseen harms associated with THN distribution or if THN is cost-effective. In order to address this research gap, we aim to determine the feasibility of a fully powered cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) of THN distribution in emergency settings.
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 1