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Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans

Inger Skrede, Claude Murat, Jaqueline Hess, Sundy Maurice, Jørn Henrik Sønstebø, Annegret Kohler, Dominique Barry‐Etienne, Dan Eastwood Orcid Logo, Nils Högberg, Francis Martin, Håvard Kauserud

Molecular Ecology, Volume: 30, Issue: 12, Pages: 2772 - 2789

Swansea University Author: Dan Eastwood Orcid Logo

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/mec.15934

Abstract

Globalization and international trade have impacted organisms around the world leading to a considerable number of species establishing in new geographic areas. Many organisms have taken advantage of human-made environments, including buildings. One such species is the dry rot fungus Serpula lacryma...

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Published in: Molecular Ecology
ISSN: 0962-1083 1365-294X
Published: Wiley 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57678
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One such species is the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, which is the most aggressive wood-decay fungus in indoor environments in temperate regions. Using population genomic analyses of 36 full genome sequenced isolates, we demonstrated that European and Japanese isolates are highly divergent and the populations split 3000&#x2013;19,000 generations ago, probably predating human influence. Approximately 250 generations ago, the European population went through a tight bottleneck, probably corresponding to the fungus colonization of the built environment in Europe. The demographic history of these populations, probably lead to low adaptive potential. Only two loci under selection were identified using a Fst outlier approach, and selective sweep analyses identified three loci with extended haplotype homozygosity. The selective sweep analyses found signals in genes possibly related to decay of various substrates in Japan and in genes involved DNA replication and protein modification in Europe. 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spelling 2022-10-31T10:34:50.5148644 v2 57678 2021-08-23 Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans 4982f3fa83886c0362e2bb43ce1c027f 0000-0002-7015-0739 Dan Eastwood Dan Eastwood true false 2021-08-23 SBI Globalization and international trade have impacted organisms around the world leading to a considerable number of species establishing in new geographic areas. Many organisms have taken advantage of human-made environments, including buildings. One such species is the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, which is the most aggressive wood-decay fungus in indoor environments in temperate regions. Using population genomic analyses of 36 full genome sequenced isolates, we demonstrated that European and Japanese isolates are highly divergent and the populations split 3000–19,000 generations ago, probably predating human influence. Approximately 250 generations ago, the European population went through a tight bottleneck, probably corresponding to the fungus colonization of the built environment in Europe. The demographic history of these populations, probably lead to low adaptive potential. Only two loci under selection were identified using a Fst outlier approach, and selective sweep analyses identified three loci with extended haplotype homozygosity. The selective sweep analyses found signals in genes possibly related to decay of various substrates in Japan and in genes involved DNA replication and protein modification in Europe. Our results suggest that the dry rot fungus independently established in indoor environments in Europe and Japan and that invasive species can potentially establish large populations in new habitats based on a few colonizing individuals. Journal Article Molecular Ecology 30 12 2772 2789 Wiley 0962-1083 1365-294X demographic inference; dry rot; fungi; population genomics; selection 8 6 2021 2021-06-08 10.1111/mec.15934 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University Another institution paid the OA fee Universitetet i Oslo; Laboratory of Excellence ARBRE, Region Lorraine, European Regional Development Fund, Grant/Award Number: ANR-11-LABX0002-01; Beijing Forest University; The Reserach Council of Norway, Grant/Award Number: 221840 2022-10-31T10:34:50.5148644 2021-08-23T11:57:05.7322050 Faculty of Science and Engineering School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences Inger Skrede 1 Claude Murat 2 Jaqueline Hess 3 Sundy Maurice 4 Jørn Henrik Sønstebø 5 Annegret Kohler 6 Dominique Barry‐Etienne 7 Dan Eastwood 0000-0002-7015-0739 8 Nils Högberg 9 Francis Martin 10 Håvard Kauserud 11 57678__20857__0e8302ba8d5a4a868ea5a1c6e3636852.pdf 57678.pdf 2021-09-15T16:58:29.0029935 Output 1584263 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2021 The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
title Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
spellingShingle Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
Dan Eastwood
title_short Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
title_full Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
title_fullStr Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
title_full_unstemmed Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
title_sort Contrasting demographic histories revealed in two invasive populations of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
author_id_str_mv 4982f3fa83886c0362e2bb43ce1c027f
author_id_fullname_str_mv 4982f3fa83886c0362e2bb43ce1c027f_***_Dan Eastwood
author Dan Eastwood
author2 Inger Skrede
Claude Murat
Jaqueline Hess
Sundy Maurice
Jørn Henrik Sønstebø
Annegret Kohler
Dominique Barry‐Etienne
Dan Eastwood
Nils Högberg
Francis Martin
Håvard Kauserud
format Journal article
container_title Molecular Ecology
container_volume 30
container_issue 12
container_start_page 2772
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 0962-1083
1365-294X
doi_str_mv 10.1111/mec.15934
publisher Wiley
college_str Faculty of Science and Engineering
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hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofscienceandengineering
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Science and Engineering
department_str School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Science and Engineering{{{_:::_}}}School of Biosciences, Geography and Physics - Biosciences
document_store_str 1
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description Globalization and international trade have impacted organisms around the world leading to a considerable number of species establishing in new geographic areas. Many organisms have taken advantage of human-made environments, including buildings. One such species is the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, which is the most aggressive wood-decay fungus in indoor environments in temperate regions. Using population genomic analyses of 36 full genome sequenced isolates, we demonstrated that European and Japanese isolates are highly divergent and the populations split 3000–19,000 generations ago, probably predating human influence. Approximately 250 generations ago, the European population went through a tight bottleneck, probably corresponding to the fungus colonization of the built environment in Europe. The demographic history of these populations, probably lead to low adaptive potential. Only two loci under selection were identified using a Fst outlier approach, and selective sweep analyses identified three loci with extended haplotype homozygosity. The selective sweep analyses found signals in genes possibly related to decay of various substrates in Japan and in genes involved DNA replication and protein modification in Europe. Our results suggest that the dry rot fungus independently established in indoor environments in Europe and Japan and that invasive species can potentially establish large populations in new habitats based on a few colonizing individuals.
published_date 2021-06-08T04:06:14Z
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