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Older adults, informal support, and the process of driving cessation / Amy Murray

Swansea University Author: Amy, Murray

DOI (Published version): 10.23889/SUthesis.57737

Abstract

The following thesis is based upon an exploration into the process of driving cessation in later life, with a specific focus upon informal support. Although informal support has been highlighted as a highly important factor across the process of driving cessation (Johnson, 2008; Hanson & Hilldeb...

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Published: Swansea 2021
Institution: Swansea University
Degree level: Doctoral
Degree name: Ph.D
Supervisor: Musselwhite, Charles; Hillcoat-Nalletamby, Sarah
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57737
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first_indexed 2021-08-31T13:31:58Z
last_indexed 2021-09-03T03:22:00Z
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spelling 2021-09-02T15:24:10.7329891 v2 57737 2021-08-31 Older adults, informal support, and the process of driving cessation 7562eb441b08ed56631b288d2524485f Amy Murray Amy Murray true false 2021-08-31 PHAC The following thesis is based upon an exploration into the process of driving cessation in later life, with a specific focus upon informal support. Although informal support has been highlighted as a highly important factor across the process of driving cessation (Johnson, 2008; Hanson & Hilldebrand, 2011; Ichikawa et al, 2016; Schryer et al, 2017), there is limited research which has explored this in depth. There is even less literature available which has incorporated the views of informal support network members, to understand their lived experiences of the driving cessation process. Studies which have addressed this gap, have tended to focus upon the views of adult children only (Rosenbloom, 2010; O’Connell et al, 2013). Using a phenomenological line of qualitative inquiry, individual semi-structured interviews with current and retired older drivers (n=15), and their family, friends, and wider community members (n=15) were completed. This was to provide a holistic approach to understand the driving cessation process, for the receivers and providers of informal support. Following a detailed thematic analysis, findings revealed both the process of driving cessation and informal support, to be profoundly complex, multi-faceted phenomena’s, holding multiple meanings for participants. This included a range of practical and psychosocial outcomes, which were both positive and negative. Often, findings were inter-linked, demonstrating the complexity of experiences amongst this far from homogeneous sample. The implications of the study have important messages for a number of individuals and groups, including older adults, their informal networks, policy and practice, and third sector organisations. E-Thesis Swansea Driving cessation, later life, informal support network, ageing, older adults, policy and practice 31 8 2021 2021-08-31 10.23889/SUthesis.57737 COLLEGE NANME Public Health COLLEGE CODE PHAC Swansea University Musselwhite, Charles; Hillcoat-Nalletamby, Sarah Doctoral Ph.D 2021-09-02T15:24:10.7329891 2021-08-31T14:08:49.7364745 College of Human and Health Sciences Centre for Innovative Ageing Amy Murray 1 57737__20727__a86e3226d4224ace888d2fc3bd3e6431.pdf Amy Ann Murray PhD - Final corrected version.pdf 2021-08-31T15:51:32.2021455 Output 2268092 application/pdf Version of Record true Copyright: The Author, Amy Ann Murray, 2020. true eng
title Older adults, informal support, and the process of driving cessation
spellingShingle Older adults, informal support, and the process of driving cessation
Amy, Murray
title_short Older adults, informal support, and the process of driving cessation
title_full Older adults, informal support, and the process of driving cessation
title_fullStr Older adults, informal support, and the process of driving cessation
title_full_unstemmed Older adults, informal support, and the process of driving cessation
title_sort Older adults, informal support, and the process of driving cessation
author_id_str_mv 7562eb441b08ed56631b288d2524485f
author_id_fullname_str_mv 7562eb441b08ed56631b288d2524485f_***_Amy, Murray
author Amy, Murray
author2 Amy Murray
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institution Swansea University
doi_str_mv 10.23889/SUthesis.57737
college_str College of Human and Health Sciences
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hierarchy_top_title College of Human and Health Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofhumanandhealthsciences
hierarchy_parent_title College of Human and Health Sciences
department_str Centre for Innovative Ageing{{{_:::_}}}College of Human and Health Sciences{{{_:::_}}}Centre for Innovative Ageing
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description The following thesis is based upon an exploration into the process of driving cessation in later life, with a specific focus upon informal support. Although informal support has been highlighted as a highly important factor across the process of driving cessation (Johnson, 2008; Hanson & Hilldebrand, 2011; Ichikawa et al, 2016; Schryer et al, 2017), there is limited research which has explored this in depth. There is even less literature available which has incorporated the views of informal support network members, to understand their lived experiences of the driving cessation process. Studies which have addressed this gap, have tended to focus upon the views of adult children only (Rosenbloom, 2010; O’Connell et al, 2013). Using a phenomenological line of qualitative inquiry, individual semi-structured interviews with current and retired older drivers (n=15), and their family, friends, and wider community members (n=15) were completed. This was to provide a holistic approach to understand the driving cessation process, for the receivers and providers of informal support. Following a detailed thematic analysis, findings revealed both the process of driving cessation and informal support, to be profoundly complex, multi-faceted phenomena’s, holding multiple meanings for participants. This included a range of practical and psychosocial outcomes, which were both positive and negative. Often, findings were inter-linked, demonstrating the complexity of experiences amongst this far from homogeneous sample. The implications of the study have important messages for a number of individuals and groups, including older adults, their informal networks, policy and practice, and third sector organisations.
published_date 2021-08-31T04:23:37Z
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score 10.83191