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Biofilm Formation in Medical Device-Related Infection

Dietrich Mack, H. Rohde, Llinos Harris Orcid Logo, Angharad Davies Orcid Logo, M.A. Horstkotte, J.K.-M. Knobloch

The International Journal of Artificial Organs, Volume: 29, Issue: 4, Pages: 343 - 359

Swansea University Authors: Dietrich Mack, Llinos Harris Orcid Logo, Angharad Davies Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Medical device-associated infections, most frequently caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci, especially Staphylococcus epidermidis, are of increasing importance in modern medicine. Regularly, antimicrobial therapy fails without removal of the implanted device. The most important factor in the p...

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Published in: The International Journal of Artificial Organs
ISSN: 0391-3988 1724-6040
Published: SAGE Publications 2006
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57859
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Abstract: Medical device-associated infections, most frequently caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci, especially Staphylococcus epidermidis, are of increasing importance in modern medicine. Regularly, antimicrobial therapy fails without removal of the implanted device. The most important factor in the pathogenesis of medical device-associated staphylococcal infections is the formation of adherent, multilayered bacterial biofilms. There is urgent need for an increased understanding of the functional factors involved in biofilm formation, the regulation of their expression, and the interaction of those potential virulence factors in device related infection with the host. Significant progress has been made in recent years which may ultimately lead to new rational approaches for better preventive, therapeutic, and diagnostic measures.
Keywords: Polysaccharide intercellular adhesin, Primary attachment, Biofilm accumulation, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcal virulence, Alternative sigma factor σB, Adhesion, Implants
College: Swansea University Medical School
Issue: 4
Start Page: 343
End Page: 359