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Taking the Lead: innovations in classroom practices involving dogs

Helen Lewis Orcid Logo, Janet Oostendorp Godfrey Orcid Logo

Society for Companion Animal Studies Annual Conference

Swansea University Authors: Helen Lewis Orcid Logo, Janet Oostendorp Godfrey Orcid Logo

Abstract

ContextAnimals are beneficial in improving children’s social, emotional, physical, behavioural and cognitive development (Purewal et al, 2017). Since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, their role supporting wellbeing in educational contexts has increased.RationaleInvolving animals can motivat...

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Published in: Society for Companion Animal Studies Annual Conference
Published: 2021
URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57880
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fullrecord <?xml version="1.0"?><rfc1807><datestamp>2021-09-28T15:37:44.0589099</datestamp><bib-version>v2</bib-version><id>57880</id><entry>2021-09-14</entry><title>Taking the Lead: innovations in classroom practices involving dogs</title><swanseaauthors><author><sid>daebf144a10dc3164bff6ec1800d66d3</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-4329-913X</ORCID><firstname>Helen</firstname><surname>Lewis</surname><name>Helen Lewis</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author><author><sid>a1801d53be70867352706513a8b69ca0</sid><ORCID>0000-0003-2793-8456</ORCID><firstname>Janet</firstname><surname>Oostendorp Godfrey</surname><name>Janet Oostendorp Godfrey</name><active>true</active><ethesisStudent>false</ethesisStudent></author></swanseaauthors><date>2021-09-14</date><deptcode>EDUC</deptcode><abstract>ContextAnimals are beneficial in improving children&#x2019;s social, emotional, physical, behavioural and cognitive development (Purewal et al, 2017). Since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, their role supporting wellbeing in educational contexts has increased.RationaleInvolving animals can motivate children to complete tasks across the curriculum facilitating inclusive classroom practice, and as a 'social lubricant' or &#x2018;catalyst&#x2019; for conversation (Nebbe, 2003; Wells, 2009). An animal&#x2019;s presence can generate a sense of relaxation and a caring relationship with an animal can contribute to a sense of wellbeing (Fine, 2000; Lewis and Grigg, 2020). MethodIn 2021, a semi-structured, large-scale online survey of 607 teachers was undertaken, examining classroom practices involving animals in formal and informal learning. Ethical approval came from the university. In this poster we focus on practitioners' own views of the benefits/effectiveness of animals to support vulnerable children during the COVID-19 pandemic. ResultsMost respondents were based in England (66%), Wales (13%) and USA (12%), but we received responses from 23 other countries such as Vietnam, Egypt, Morocco, Hong Kong and Australia. 52% of respondents regularly involve animals in their educational practice, mainly to support wellbeing. Dogs were the most popular animal involved (43% responses). The poster explores: 1.How? Innovative ways that educators found to involve dogs during a lockdown and social distancing, including remote lunches, online clubs and 'crafting with dogs'. 2.Why? Benefits educators felt such involvement brought to their pupils, colleagues, and the animals themselves during uncertain times. 3.What Next? Comparison of and considerations made for the dog&#x2019;s wellbeing and lessons we can learn for best practices in future involvement of dogs in educational settings.There are limited systematic, international studies which have explored benefits of animal assisted interventions (Hall et al, 2016) especially during a pandemic. This poster contributes knowledge in this area.</abstract><type>Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract</type><journal>Society for Companion Animal Studies Annual Conference</journal><volume/><journalNumber/><paginationStart/><paginationEnd/><publisher/><placeOfPublication/><isbnPrint/><isbnElectronic/><issnPrint/><issnElectronic/><keywords/><publishedDay>19</publishedDay><publishedMonth>9</publishedMonth><publishedYear>2021</publishedYear><publishedDate>2021-09-19</publishedDate><doi/><url/><notes/><college>COLLEGE NANME</college><department>Education</department><CollegeCode>COLLEGE CODE</CollegeCode><DepartmentCode>EDUC</DepartmentCode><institution>Swansea University</institution><apcterm/><lastEdited>2021-09-28T15:37:44.0589099</lastEdited><Created>2021-09-14T08:52:41.2738066</Created><path><level id="1">Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences</level><level id="2">School of Social Sciences - Education and Childhood Studies</level></path><authors><author><firstname>Helen</firstname><surname>Lewis</surname><orcid>0000-0003-4329-913X</orcid><order>1</order></author><author><firstname>Janet</firstname><surname>Oostendorp Godfrey</surname><orcid>0000-0003-2793-8456</orcid><order>2</order></author></authors><documents/><OutputDurs/></rfc1807>
spelling 2021-09-28T15:37:44.0589099 v2 57880 2021-09-14 Taking the Lead: innovations in classroom practices involving dogs daebf144a10dc3164bff6ec1800d66d3 0000-0003-4329-913X Helen Lewis Helen Lewis true false a1801d53be70867352706513a8b69ca0 0000-0003-2793-8456 Janet Oostendorp Godfrey Janet Oostendorp Godfrey true false 2021-09-14 EDUC ContextAnimals are beneficial in improving children’s social, emotional, physical, behavioural and cognitive development (Purewal et al, 2017). Since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, their role supporting wellbeing in educational contexts has increased.RationaleInvolving animals can motivate children to complete tasks across the curriculum facilitating inclusive classroom practice, and as a 'social lubricant' or ‘catalyst’ for conversation (Nebbe, 2003; Wells, 2009). An animal’s presence can generate a sense of relaxation and a caring relationship with an animal can contribute to a sense of wellbeing (Fine, 2000; Lewis and Grigg, 2020). MethodIn 2021, a semi-structured, large-scale online survey of 607 teachers was undertaken, examining classroom practices involving animals in formal and informal learning. Ethical approval came from the university. In this poster we focus on practitioners' own views of the benefits/effectiveness of animals to support vulnerable children during the COVID-19 pandemic. ResultsMost respondents were based in England (66%), Wales (13%) and USA (12%), but we received responses from 23 other countries such as Vietnam, Egypt, Morocco, Hong Kong and Australia. 52% of respondents regularly involve animals in their educational practice, mainly to support wellbeing. Dogs were the most popular animal involved (43% responses). The poster explores: 1.How? Innovative ways that educators found to involve dogs during a lockdown and social distancing, including remote lunches, online clubs and 'crafting with dogs'. 2.Why? Benefits educators felt such involvement brought to their pupils, colleagues, and the animals themselves during uncertain times. 3.What Next? Comparison of and considerations made for the dog’s wellbeing and lessons we can learn for best practices in future involvement of dogs in educational settings.There are limited systematic, international studies which have explored benefits of animal assisted interventions (Hall et al, 2016) especially during a pandemic. This poster contributes knowledge in this area. Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract Society for Companion Animal Studies Annual Conference 19 9 2021 2021-09-19 COLLEGE NANME Education COLLEGE CODE EDUC Swansea University 2021-09-28T15:37:44.0589099 2021-09-14T08:52:41.2738066 Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences School of Social Sciences - Education and Childhood Studies Helen Lewis 0000-0003-4329-913X 1 Janet Oostendorp Godfrey 0000-0003-2793-8456 2
title Taking the Lead: innovations in classroom practices involving dogs
spellingShingle Taking the Lead: innovations in classroom practices involving dogs
Helen Lewis
Janet Oostendorp Godfrey
title_short Taking the Lead: innovations in classroom practices involving dogs
title_full Taking the Lead: innovations in classroom practices involving dogs
title_fullStr Taking the Lead: innovations in classroom practices involving dogs
title_full_unstemmed Taking the Lead: innovations in classroom practices involving dogs
title_sort Taking the Lead: innovations in classroom practices involving dogs
author_id_str_mv daebf144a10dc3164bff6ec1800d66d3
a1801d53be70867352706513a8b69ca0
author_id_fullname_str_mv daebf144a10dc3164bff6ec1800d66d3_***_Helen Lewis
a1801d53be70867352706513a8b69ca0_***_Janet Oostendorp Godfrey
author Helen Lewis
Janet Oostendorp Godfrey
author2 Helen Lewis
Janet Oostendorp Godfrey
format Conference Paper/Proceeding/Abstract
container_title Society for Companion Animal Studies Annual Conference
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
college_str Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
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hierarchy_top_id facultyofhumanitiesandsocialsciences
hierarchy_top_title Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
hierarchy_parent_id facultyofhumanitiesandsocialsciences
hierarchy_parent_title Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
department_str School of Social Sciences - Education and Childhood Studies{{{_:::_}}}Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences{{{_:::_}}}School of Social Sciences - Education and Childhood Studies
document_store_str 0
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description ContextAnimals are beneficial in improving children’s social, emotional, physical, behavioural and cognitive development (Purewal et al, 2017). Since the outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic, their role supporting wellbeing in educational contexts has increased.RationaleInvolving animals can motivate children to complete tasks across the curriculum facilitating inclusive classroom practice, and as a 'social lubricant' or ‘catalyst’ for conversation (Nebbe, 2003; Wells, 2009). An animal’s presence can generate a sense of relaxation and a caring relationship with an animal can contribute to a sense of wellbeing (Fine, 2000; Lewis and Grigg, 2020). MethodIn 2021, a semi-structured, large-scale online survey of 607 teachers was undertaken, examining classroom practices involving animals in formal and informal learning. Ethical approval came from the university. In this poster we focus on practitioners' own views of the benefits/effectiveness of animals to support vulnerable children during the COVID-19 pandemic. ResultsMost respondents were based in England (66%), Wales (13%) and USA (12%), but we received responses from 23 other countries such as Vietnam, Egypt, Morocco, Hong Kong and Australia. 52% of respondents regularly involve animals in their educational practice, mainly to support wellbeing. Dogs were the most popular animal involved (43% responses). The poster explores: 1.How? Innovative ways that educators found to involve dogs during a lockdown and social distancing, including remote lunches, online clubs and 'crafting with dogs'. 2.Why? Benefits educators felt such involvement brought to their pupils, colleagues, and the animals themselves during uncertain times. 3.What Next? Comparison of and considerations made for the dog’s wellbeing and lessons we can learn for best practices in future involvement of dogs in educational settings.There are limited systematic, international studies which have explored benefits of animal assisted interventions (Hall et al, 2016) especially during a pandemic. This poster contributes knowledge in this area.
published_date 2021-09-19T04:13:56Z
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