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Randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of a targeted cancer awareness intervention for adults living in deprived areas of the UK

Yvonne Moriarty, Mandy Lau, Berni Sewell Orcid Logo, Rob Trubey, Harriet Quinn-Scoggins, Sioned Owen, Louise Padgett, Vasiliki Kolovou, Julie Hepburn, Peter Buckle, Rebecca Playle, Julia Townson, Michael Robling, Stephanie Gilbert, Polyxeni Dimitropoulou, Adrian Edwards, Caroline Mitchell, Maura Matthews, Stephanie Smits, Fiona Wood, Richard D. Neal, Kate Brain, Mari Jones Orcid Logo, Angela Farr Orcid Logo, (ABACus study team)

British Journal of Cancer, Volume: 125, Issue: 8, Pages: 1100 - 1110

Swansea University Authors: Berni Sewell Orcid Logo, Mari Jones Orcid Logo, Angela Farr Orcid Logo

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Abstract

BackgroundCancer outcomes are poor in socioeconomically deprived communities, with low symptom awareness contributing to prolonged help-seeking and advanced disease. Targeted cancer awareness interventions require evaluation.MethodsThis is a randomised controlled trial involving adults aged 40+ year...

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Published in: British Journal of Cancer
ISSN: 0007-0920 1532-1827
Published: Springer Science and Business Media LLC 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa57888
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Abstract: BackgroundCancer outcomes are poor in socioeconomically deprived communities, with low symptom awareness contributing to prolonged help-seeking and advanced disease. Targeted cancer awareness interventions require evaluation.MethodsThis is a randomised controlled trial involving adults aged 40+ years recruited in community and healthcare settings in deprived areas of South Yorkshire and South-East Wales. Intervention: personalised behavioural advice facilitated by a trained lay advisor. Control: usual care. Follow-up at two weeks and six months post-randomisation. Primary outcome: total cancer symptom recognition score two weeks post-randomisation.ResultsTwo hundred and thirty-four participants were randomised. The difference in total symptom recognition at two weeks [adjusted mean difference (AMD) 0.6, 95% CI: −0.03, 1.17, p = 0.06] was not statistically significant. Intervention participants reported increased symptom recognition (AMD 0.8, 95% CI: 0.18, 1.37, p = 0.01) and earlier intended presentation (AMD −2.0, 95% CI: −3.02, −0.91, p < 0.001) at six months. “Lesser known” symptom recognition was higher in the intervention arm (2 weeks AMD 0.5, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.97 and six months AMD 0.7, 95% CI: 0.16, 1.17). Implementation cost per participant was £91.34, with no significant between-group differences in healthcare resource use post-intervention.ConclusionsImproved symptom recognition and earlier anticipated presentation occurred at longer-term follow-up. The ABACus Health Check is a viable low-cost intervention to increase cancer awareness in socioeconomically deprived communities.
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Funders: This work was supported by Yorkshire Cancer Research grant number C402. This research comes under the auspices of the Health and Care Research Wales funded by Primary and Emergency Care Research Centre (PRIME) [517195] and Wales Cancer Research Centre [517190]. The Centre for Trials Research (CTR) is funded through the Welsh Government by Health and Care Research Wales and Cancer Research UK.
Issue: 8
Start Page: 1100
End Page: 1110