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The Split Personality of Beauveria bassiana: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Fungal Parasitism and Mutualism

Almudena Ortiz-Urquiza Orcid Logo

mSystems, Volume: 6, Issue: 4

Swansea University Author: Almudena Ortiz-Urquiza Orcid Logo

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Abstract

Fungal pathogenicity toward insects has independently evolved several times, resulting in specialist and generalist pathogens, some of whom have maintained aspects of their previous lifestyles. Being able to grow as an endophyte (engaging in a mutualistic interaction with plants) or saprophyte (recy...

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Published in: mSystems
ISSN: 2379-5077
Published: American Society for Microbiology 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58011
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spelling 2021-10-21T12:52:06.0573068 v2 58011 2021-09-22 The Split Personality of Beauveria bassiana: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Fungal Parasitism and Mutualism e7a98d15b13d99afe20be42437e044ec 0000-0002-1748-721X Almudena Ortiz-Urquiza Almudena Ortiz-Urquiza true false 2021-09-22 SBI Fungal pathogenicity toward insects has independently evolved several times, resulting in specialist and generalist pathogens, some of whom have maintained aspects of their previous lifestyles. Being able to grow as an endophyte (engaging in a mutualistic interaction with plants) or saprophyte (recycling nutrients back into the environment), the generalist (broad-host-range) fungus Beauveria bassiana does not need to rely on insect hosts to complete its life cycle. The diverse lifestyles of this fungus, saprophyte, pathogen, and symbiont, provide a unique system, with available genetic tools, to examine host-pathogen interactions, plant-fungus mutualistic relationships, and fungal development. This commentary highlights overlooked pathogenic and mutualistic aspects of B. bassiana that assist this fungus in shifting along the saprobe/parasite/mutualist continuum. Addressing these knowledge gaps and scrutinizing valuable players driving such a spectrum of ecological interactions will enrich our knowledge of fundamental environmental microbiology and help develop new approaches to pest control and sustainable farming. Journal Article mSystems 6 4 American Society for Microbiology 2379-5077 Beauveria bassiana, VOCs, cuticular lipids, endophytic growth, fungal toxins, lipid assimilation, lipid hydrolysis, plant-fungus association, saprobe/parasite/mutualist continuum, targeted gene knockout 24 8 2021 2021-08-24 10.1128/msystems.00766-21 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University 2021-10-21T12:52:06.0573068 2021-09-22T16:08:56.2944527 College of Science Biosciences Almudena Ortiz-Urquiza 0000-0002-1748-721X 1 58011__20968__10af9080938843e2aca34d81a89416be.pdf 58011.pdf 2021-09-22T16:10:44.0741170 Output 805846 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2021 Ortiz-Urquiza. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International license true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title The Split Personality of Beauveria bassiana: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Fungal Parasitism and Mutualism
spellingShingle The Split Personality of Beauveria bassiana: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Fungal Parasitism and Mutualism
Almudena Ortiz-Urquiza
title_short The Split Personality of Beauveria bassiana: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Fungal Parasitism and Mutualism
title_full The Split Personality of Beauveria bassiana: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Fungal Parasitism and Mutualism
title_fullStr The Split Personality of Beauveria bassiana: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Fungal Parasitism and Mutualism
title_full_unstemmed The Split Personality of Beauveria bassiana: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Fungal Parasitism and Mutualism
title_sort The Split Personality of Beauveria bassiana: Understanding the Molecular Basis of Fungal Parasitism and Mutualism
author_id_str_mv e7a98d15b13d99afe20be42437e044ec
author_id_fullname_str_mv e7a98d15b13d99afe20be42437e044ec_***_Almudena Ortiz-Urquiza
author Almudena Ortiz-Urquiza
author2 Almudena Ortiz-Urquiza
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container_title mSystems
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issn 2379-5077
doi_str_mv 10.1128/msystems.00766-21
publisher American Society for Microbiology
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
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description Fungal pathogenicity toward insects has independently evolved several times, resulting in specialist and generalist pathogens, some of whom have maintained aspects of their previous lifestyles. Being able to grow as an endophyte (engaging in a mutualistic interaction with plants) or saprophyte (recycling nutrients back into the environment), the generalist (broad-host-range) fungus Beauveria bassiana does not need to rely on insect hosts to complete its life cycle. The diverse lifestyles of this fungus, saprophyte, pathogen, and symbiont, provide a unique system, with available genetic tools, to examine host-pathogen interactions, plant-fungus mutualistic relationships, and fungal development. This commentary highlights overlooked pathogenic and mutualistic aspects of B. bassiana that assist this fungus in shifting along the saprobe/parasite/mutualist continuum. Addressing these knowledge gaps and scrutinizing valuable players driving such a spectrum of ecological interactions will enrich our knowledge of fundamental environmental microbiology and help develop new approaches to pest control and sustainable farming.
published_date 2021-08-24T04:14:27Z
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