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Setting priority conservation management regions to reverse rapid range decline of a key neotropical forest ungulate / Júlia Emi de Faria Oshima, Maria Luisa S.P. Jorge, Thadeu Sobral-Souza, Luca Borger, Alexine Keuroghlian, Carlos A. Peres, Maurício Humberto Vancine, Ben Collen, Milton Cezar Ribeiro

Global Ecology and Conservation, Volume: 31, Start page: e01796

Swansea University Author: Luca Borger

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Abstract

Mammals are important components of biodiversity that have been drastically and rapidly impacted by climate change, habitat loss, and anthropogenic pressure. Understanding key species distribution to optimize conservation targets is both urgent and necessary to reverse the current biodiversity crisi...

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Published in: Global Ecology and Conservation
ISSN: 2351-9894
Published: Elsevier BV 2021
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Herein, we applied habitat suitability models for a key Neotropical forest ungulate, the white-lipped peccary (WLP Tayassu pecari), to investigate the effects of climate and landscape modifications on its distribution, which has been drastically reduced in Brazil. We used 318 primary records of WLP to derive habitat suitability maps across Brazil. Our models included bioclimatic, topographic, landscape, and human influence predictors in two modelling approaches. Models including all categories of predictors obtained the highest predictive ability and showed prevalence of suitable areas in forested regions of the country, covering 49% of the Brazilian territory. Filtering out small forest fragments (&lt;2050 ha) reduced the suitable area by 5%, with a further reduction of 4% that was caused by deforestation until 2020, therefore until 2020, the species has suffered a reduction of ~60% from its historical range in Brazil. 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spelling 2021-10-21T16:47:55.1726046 v2 58056 2021-09-23 Setting priority conservation management regions to reverse rapid range decline of a key neotropical forest ungulate 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2 0000-0001-8763-5997 Luca Borger Luca Borger true false 2021-09-23 SBI Mammals are important components of biodiversity that have been drastically and rapidly impacted by climate change, habitat loss, and anthropogenic pressure. Understanding key species distribution to optimize conservation targets is both urgent and necessary to reverse the current biodiversity crisis. Herein, we applied habitat suitability models for a key Neotropical forest ungulate, the white-lipped peccary (WLP Tayassu pecari), to investigate the effects of climate and landscape modifications on its distribution, which has been drastically reduced in Brazil. We used 318 primary records of WLP to derive habitat suitability maps across Brazil. Our models included bioclimatic, topographic, landscape, and human influence predictors in two modelling approaches. Models including all categories of predictors obtained the highest predictive ability and showed prevalence of suitable areas in forested regions of the country, covering 49% of the Brazilian territory. Filtering out small forest fragments (<2050 ha) reduced the suitable area by 5%, with a further reduction of 4% that was caused by deforestation until 2020, therefore until 2020, the species has suffered a reduction of ~60% from its historical range in Brazil. Of the 40% of the Brazilian territory suitable to WLP, only 12% are protected. In the Atlantic Forest, only half of all protected areas have suitable habitat for WLP and even less in Pantanal (44%), Cerrado (14%) and Caatinga (7%). In a second modelling approach, mapping the areas with suitable climate and those with suitable landscapes separately, allowed us to identify four categories of conservation values, and showed that only 17% of the Brazilian territory has both high landscape and climatic suitability for WLP. Our models can help with complementary conservation management strategies and actions that could be essential in slowing down and possibly reversing current trends of population and geographic range reductions for te species, thereby averting a possible future collapse of forest ecosystem functioning in the Neotropical region. Journal Article Global Ecology and Conservation 31 e01796 Elsevier BV 2351-9894 Tayassu pecari, species distribution model, deforestation, habitat fragmentation, habitat loss, defaunation, protected areas 1 11 2021 2021-11-01 10.1016/j.gecco.2021.e01796 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University This research was funded by Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel (CAPES) agreement with S˜ao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) for grants (2014/23132–2, 2016/09957–4, 2013/50421–2, and 2017/09676–8) and National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPQ grant: 161089/2014–3). 2021-10-21T16:47:55.1726046 2021-09-23T16:07:49.8569977 College of Science Biosciences Júlia Emi de Faria Oshima 1 Maria Luisa S.P. Jorge 2 Thadeu Sobral-Souza 3 Luca Borger 0000-0001-8763-5997 4 Alexine Keuroghlian 5 Carlos A. Peres 6 Maurício Humberto Vancine 7 Ben Collen 8 Milton Cezar Ribeiro 9 58056__21271__1f92e862de08456bb727cd7e26745a14.pdf 58056.pdf 2021-10-21T16:43:44.7057668 Output 7268266 application/pdf Version of Record true © 2021 The Authors. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license true eng https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
title Setting priority conservation management regions to reverse rapid range decline of a key neotropical forest ungulate
spellingShingle Setting priority conservation management regions to reverse rapid range decline of a key neotropical forest ungulate
Luca, Borger
title_short Setting priority conservation management regions to reverse rapid range decline of a key neotropical forest ungulate
title_full Setting priority conservation management regions to reverse rapid range decline of a key neotropical forest ungulate
title_fullStr Setting priority conservation management regions to reverse rapid range decline of a key neotropical forest ungulate
title_full_unstemmed Setting priority conservation management regions to reverse rapid range decline of a key neotropical forest ungulate
title_sort Setting priority conservation management regions to reverse rapid range decline of a key neotropical forest ungulate
author_id_str_mv 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2
author_id_fullname_str_mv 8416d0ffc3cccdad6e6d67a455e7c4a2_***_Luca, Borger
author Luca, Borger
author2 Júlia Emi de Faria Oshima
Maria Luisa S.P. Jorge
Thadeu Sobral-Souza
Luca Borger
Alexine Keuroghlian
Carlos A. Peres
Maurício Humberto Vancine
Ben Collen
Milton Cezar Ribeiro
format Journal article
container_title Global Ecology and Conservation
container_volume 31
container_start_page e01796
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
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doi_str_mv 10.1016/j.gecco.2021.e01796
publisher Elsevier BV
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
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description Mammals are important components of biodiversity that have been drastically and rapidly impacted by climate change, habitat loss, and anthropogenic pressure. Understanding key species distribution to optimize conservation targets is both urgent and necessary to reverse the current biodiversity crisis. Herein, we applied habitat suitability models for a key Neotropical forest ungulate, the white-lipped peccary (WLP Tayassu pecari), to investigate the effects of climate and landscape modifications on its distribution, which has been drastically reduced in Brazil. We used 318 primary records of WLP to derive habitat suitability maps across Brazil. Our models included bioclimatic, topographic, landscape, and human influence predictors in two modelling approaches. Models including all categories of predictors obtained the highest predictive ability and showed prevalence of suitable areas in forested regions of the country, covering 49% of the Brazilian territory. Filtering out small forest fragments (<2050 ha) reduced the suitable area by 5%, with a further reduction of 4% that was caused by deforestation until 2020, therefore until 2020, the species has suffered a reduction of ~60% from its historical range in Brazil. Of the 40% of the Brazilian territory suitable to WLP, only 12% are protected. In the Atlantic Forest, only half of all protected areas have suitable habitat for WLP and even less in Pantanal (44%), Cerrado (14%) and Caatinga (7%). In a second modelling approach, mapping the areas with suitable climate and those with suitable landscapes separately, allowed us to identify four categories of conservation values, and showed that only 17% of the Brazilian territory has both high landscape and climatic suitability for WLP. Our models can help with complementary conservation management strategies and actions that could be essential in slowing down and possibly reversing current trends of population and geographic range reductions for te species, thereby averting a possible future collapse of forest ecosystem functioning in the Neotropical region.
published_date 2021-11-01T04:15:54Z
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