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Cancer diagnosis, treatment and care: A qualitative study of the experiences and health service use of Roma, Gypsies and Travellers

Louise Condon, Jolana Curejova, Donna Leeanne Morgan, Deborah Fenlon

European Journal of Cancer Care, Volume: 30, Issue: 5

Swansea University Authors: Louise Condon, Deborah Fenlon

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DOI (Published version): 10.1111/ecc.13439

Abstract

BackgroundEarly diagnosis and treatment are key to reducing deaths from cancer, but people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups are more likely to encounter delays in entering the cancer care system. Roma, Gypsies and Travellers are ethnic minorities who experience extreme health inequalities...

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Published in: European Journal of Cancer Care
ISSN: 0961-5423 1365-2354
Published: Wiley 2021
Online Access: Check full text

URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58150
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Abstract: BackgroundEarly diagnosis and treatment are key to reducing deaths from cancer, but people from Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) groups are more likely to encounter delays in entering the cancer care system. Roma, Gypsies and Travellers are ethnic minorities who experience extreme health inequalities.ObjectiveTo explore the experiences of cancer diagnosis, treatment and care among people who self-identify as Roma or Gypsies and Travellers.MethodsA participatory qualitative approach was taken. Peer researchers conducted semi-structured interviews (n = 37) and one focus group (n = 4) with community members in Wales and England, UK.ResultsCancer fatalism is declining, but Roma, Gypsies and Travellers experience barriers to cancer healthcare at service user, service provider and organisational levels. Communication was problematic for all groups, and Roma participants reported lack of access to interpreters within primary care. Clear communication and trusting relationships with health professionals are highly valued and most frequently found in tertiary care.ConclusionThis study suggests that Roma, Gypsies and Travellers are motivated to access health care for cancer diagnosis and treatment, but barriers experienced in primary care can prevent or delay access to diagnostic and treatment services. Organisational changes, plus increased cultural competence among health professionals, have the potential to reduce inequalities in early detection of cancer.
Keywords: cancer care; cancer diagnosis; cancer treatment; early detection; health services; Roma; Gypsies and Travellers: qualitative
College: College of Human and Health Sciences
Funders: Tenovus Cancer Care iGrant
Issue: 5