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Porous Geometry Guided Micro-mechanical Environment Within Scaffolds for Cell Mechanobiology Study in Bone Tissue Engineering / Feihu Zhao, Yi Xiong, Keita Ito, Bert van Rietbergen, Sandra Hofmann

Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, Volume: 9, Start page: 736489

Swansea University Author: Feihu Zhao

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Abstract

Mechanobiology research is for understanding the role of mechanics in cell physiology and pathology. It will have implications for studying bone physiology and pathology and to guide the strategy for regenerating both the structural and functional features of bone. Mechanobiological studies in vitro...

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Published in: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology
ISSN: 2296-4185
Published: Frontiers Media SA 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58151
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spelling 2021-10-25T16:08:39.9032826 v2 58151 2021-09-29 Porous Geometry Guided Micro-mechanical Environment Within Scaffolds for Cell Mechanobiology Study in Bone Tissue Engineering 1c6e79b6edd08c88a8d17a241cd78630 0000-0003-0515-6808 Feihu Zhao Feihu Zhao true false 2021-09-29 MEDE Mechanobiology research is for understanding the role of mechanics in cell physiology and pathology. It will have implications for studying bone physiology and pathology and to guide the strategy for regenerating both the structural and functional features of bone. Mechanobiological studies in vitro apply a dynamic micro-mechanical environment to cells via bioreactors. Porous scaffolds are commonly used for housing the cells in a three-dimensional (3D) culturing environment. Such scaffolds usually have different pore geometries (e.g. with different pore shapes, pore dimensions and porosities). These pore geometries can affect the internal micro-mechanical environment that the cells experience when loaded in the bioreactor. Therefore, to adjust the applied micro-mechanical environment on cells, researchers can tune either the applied load and/or the design of the scaffold pore geometries. This review will provide information on how the micro-mechanical environment (e.g. fluid-induced wall shear stress and mechanical strain) is affected by various scaffold pore geometries within different bioreactors. It shall allow researchers to estimate/quantify the micro-mechanical environment according to the already known pore geometry information, or to find a suitable pore geometry according to the desirable micro-mechanical environment to be applied. Finally, as future work, artificial intelligent – assisted techniques, which can achieve an automatic design of solid porous scaffold geometry for tuning/optimising the micro-mechanical environment are suggested. Journal Article Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology 9 736489 Frontiers Media SA 2296-4185 Bioengineering and Biotechnology, micro-mechanical environment, mechanical stimulation, scaffold porous geometry, mechanobiology, bone tissue engineering 14 9 2021 2021-09-14 10.3389/fbioe.2021.736489 Mini Review Article COLLEGE NANME Biomedical Engineering COLLEGE CODE MEDE Swansea University EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013); grant agreement number 336043 (project: REMOTE); SCoRE Cymru Award (reference number: SWF19004) 2021-10-25T16:08:39.9032826 2021-09-29T15:44:03.6987640 College of Engineering Engineering Feihu Zhao 0000-0003-0515-6808 1 Yi Xiong 2 Keita Ito 3 Bert van Rietbergen 4 Sandra Hofmann 5 58151__21057__18a34fdad9634c54a9bf4ba3af8b9ce3.pdf fbioe-09-736489.pdf 2021-09-29T15:44:03.6985879 Output 1278500 application/pdf Version of Record true Copyright © 2021 Zhao, Xiong, Ito, van Rietbergen and Hofmann. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. true eng http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
title Porous Geometry Guided Micro-mechanical Environment Within Scaffolds for Cell Mechanobiology Study in Bone Tissue Engineering
spellingShingle Porous Geometry Guided Micro-mechanical Environment Within Scaffolds for Cell Mechanobiology Study in Bone Tissue Engineering
Feihu, Zhao
title_short Porous Geometry Guided Micro-mechanical Environment Within Scaffolds for Cell Mechanobiology Study in Bone Tissue Engineering
title_full Porous Geometry Guided Micro-mechanical Environment Within Scaffolds for Cell Mechanobiology Study in Bone Tissue Engineering
title_fullStr Porous Geometry Guided Micro-mechanical Environment Within Scaffolds for Cell Mechanobiology Study in Bone Tissue Engineering
title_full_unstemmed Porous Geometry Guided Micro-mechanical Environment Within Scaffolds for Cell Mechanobiology Study in Bone Tissue Engineering
title_sort Porous Geometry Guided Micro-mechanical Environment Within Scaffolds for Cell Mechanobiology Study in Bone Tissue Engineering
author_id_str_mv 1c6e79b6edd08c88a8d17a241cd78630
author_id_fullname_str_mv 1c6e79b6edd08c88a8d17a241cd78630_***_Feihu, Zhao
author Feihu, Zhao
author2 Feihu Zhao
Yi Xiong
Keita Ito
Bert van Rietbergen
Sandra Hofmann
format Journal article
container_title Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology
container_volume 9
container_start_page 736489
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
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publisher Frontiers Media SA
college_str College of Engineering
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description Mechanobiology research is for understanding the role of mechanics in cell physiology and pathology. It will have implications for studying bone physiology and pathology and to guide the strategy for regenerating both the structural and functional features of bone. Mechanobiological studies in vitro apply a dynamic micro-mechanical environment to cells via bioreactors. Porous scaffolds are commonly used for housing the cells in a three-dimensional (3D) culturing environment. Such scaffolds usually have different pore geometries (e.g. with different pore shapes, pore dimensions and porosities). These pore geometries can affect the internal micro-mechanical environment that the cells experience when loaded in the bioreactor. Therefore, to adjust the applied micro-mechanical environment on cells, researchers can tune either the applied load and/or the design of the scaffold pore geometries. This review will provide information on how the micro-mechanical environment (e.g. fluid-induced wall shear stress and mechanical strain) is affected by various scaffold pore geometries within different bioreactors. It shall allow researchers to estimate/quantify the micro-mechanical environment according to the already known pore geometry information, or to find a suitable pore geometry according to the desirable micro-mechanical environment to be applied. Finally, as future work, artificial intelligent – assisted techniques, which can achieve an automatic design of solid porous scaffold geometry for tuning/optimising the micro-mechanical environment are suggested.
published_date 2021-09-14T04:14:41Z
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