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High accuracy tracking reveals how small conservation areas can protect marine megafauna / Graeme C. Hays, Jeanne A. Mortimer, Alex Rattray, Takahiro Shimada, Nicole Esteban

Ecological Applications, Volume: 31, Issue: 7

Swansea University Author: Nicole Esteban

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DOI (Published version): 10.1002/eap.2418

Abstract

Space use estimates can inform conservation management but relaying high accuracy locations is often not straightforward. We used Fastloc-GPS Argos satellite tags with the innovation of additional data relay via a ground station (termed a “Mote”) to record high volumes (typically >20 locations pe...

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Published in: Ecological Applications
ISSN: 1051-0761 1939-5582
Published: Wiley 2021
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URI: https://cronfa.swan.ac.uk/Record/cronfa58161
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spelling 2021-11-30T15:31:33.0205704 v2 58161 2021-09-30 High accuracy tracking reveals how small conservation areas can protect marine megafauna fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319 0000-0003-4693-7221 Nicole Esteban Nicole Esteban true false 2021-09-30 SBI Space use estimates can inform conservation management but relaying high accuracy locations is often not straightforward. We used Fastloc-GPS Argos satellite tags with the innovation of additional data relay via a ground station (termed a “Mote”) to record high volumes (typically >20 locations per individual per day) of high accuracy tracking data. Tags were attached in the Chagos Archipelago (Indian Ocean) in 2018–2019 to 23 immature turtles of two species for which there have been long-standing conservation concerns: 21 hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and two green turtles (Chelonia mydas). Over long tracking durations (mean 227.6 d per individual), most turtles moved very little. For example, 17 of 21 hawksbill turtles remained continuously in the lagoon where they were equipped, with 95% and 50% utilization distributions (UDs) averaging only 1.03 and 0.18 km2, respectively. Many individuals, and both species, could use the same small spaces, i.e., individuals did not maintain unique home ranges. However, three hawksbill turtles travelled hundreds of kilometersfrom the tagging site. Our results show that, for some large marine vertebrates, even small protectedareas of only a few square kilometers can encompass the movements of a large proportion of individuals over long periods. High accuracy tracking may likewise reveal the details of space use for many other animals that move little and/or use important focal areas and where previous low-accuracy tracking techniques have tended to overestimate space use . Journal Article Ecological Applications 31 7 Wiley 1051-0761 1939-5582 animal tracking; Argos; BIOTMPA; conservation planning; sea turtle 8 6 2021 2021-06-08 10.1002/eap.2418 COLLEGE NANME Biosciences COLLEGE CODE SBI Swansea University Not Required Bertarelli Foundation 2021-11-30T15:31:33.0205704 2021-09-30T16:42:58.3528293 College of Science Biosciences Graeme C. Hays 1 Jeanne A. Mortimer 2 Alex Rattray 3 Takahiro Shimada 4 Nicole Esteban 0000-0003-4693-7221 5
title High accuracy tracking reveals how small conservation areas can protect marine megafauna
spellingShingle High accuracy tracking reveals how small conservation areas can protect marine megafauna
Nicole, Esteban
title_short High accuracy tracking reveals how small conservation areas can protect marine megafauna
title_full High accuracy tracking reveals how small conservation areas can protect marine megafauna
title_fullStr High accuracy tracking reveals how small conservation areas can protect marine megafauna
title_full_unstemmed High accuracy tracking reveals how small conservation areas can protect marine megafauna
title_sort High accuracy tracking reveals how small conservation areas can protect marine megafauna
author_id_str_mv fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319
author_id_fullname_str_mv fb2e760b83b4580e7445092982f1f319_***_Nicole, Esteban
author Nicole, Esteban
author2 Graeme C. Hays
Jeanne A. Mortimer
Alex Rattray
Takahiro Shimada
Nicole Esteban
format Journal article
container_title Ecological Applications
container_volume 31
container_issue 7
publishDate 2021
institution Swansea University
issn 1051-0761
1939-5582
doi_str_mv 10.1002/eap.2418
publisher Wiley
college_str College of Science
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hierarchy_top_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_top_title College of Science
hierarchy_parent_id collegeofscience
hierarchy_parent_title College of Science
department_str Biosciences{{{_:::_}}}College of Science{{{_:::_}}}Biosciences
document_store_str 0
active_str 0
description Space use estimates can inform conservation management but relaying high accuracy locations is often not straightforward. We used Fastloc-GPS Argos satellite tags with the innovation of additional data relay via a ground station (termed a “Mote”) to record high volumes (typically >20 locations per individual per day) of high accuracy tracking data. Tags were attached in the Chagos Archipelago (Indian Ocean) in 2018–2019 to 23 immature turtles of two species for which there have been long-standing conservation concerns: 21 hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and two green turtles (Chelonia mydas). Over long tracking durations (mean 227.6 d per individual), most turtles moved very little. For example, 17 of 21 hawksbill turtles remained continuously in the lagoon where they were equipped, with 95% and 50% utilization distributions (UDs) averaging only 1.03 and 0.18 km2, respectively. Many individuals, and both species, could use the same small spaces, i.e., individuals did not maintain unique home ranges. However, three hawksbill turtles travelled hundreds of kilometersfrom the tagging site. Our results show that, for some large marine vertebrates, even small protectedareas of only a few square kilometers can encompass the movements of a large proportion of individuals over long periods. High accuracy tracking may likewise reveal the details of space use for many other animals that move little and/or use important focal areas and where previous low-accuracy tracking techniques have tended to overestimate space use .
published_date 2021-06-08T04:29:01Z
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score 10.852089